You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Madison Presidency
    • Madison Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Madison Presidency" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 15,180 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
misjudged the interest of our own Country in refusing to sanction a principle that might be productive of more extensive evils than those it was our aim to prevent. Neutral flag. As it is possible that another attempt will be made during the present war to establish the rule that free bottoms make free goods I ought not to omit the communication of the following anecdote. Soon after the...
I have hitherto delayed a settlement of the Accts: of Messrs: Pierce & Hudson, (the Witnesses who attended the Trial of Captn: Whitby) not having obtained the necessary Vouchers by which I might as certain what Sums were paid to them in England by Mr: Munroe. To this Gentleman I some time since addressed a letter upon the subject, and he informs me that what Money the Witnesses required in...
Notes for the clear rents of the Upper & Lower fields of Henderson ’s lands 1807. Nov. 17. possession was delivered by John Henderson . D  1808.9. T. E. Randolph pd rent for the Dower house & lands & the upper field 90   he then gave up the lands & paid for the house & garden 60.  consequently the lands had been rated @ 30.  deduct for the Dower lands 15. a s 15
There are two Sentences in Talleyrand’s Letter of the 28th of August, 1798 which ought not to pass unnoticed, the first “In France it was Supposed that the Government of the United States, wished only the appearances of a Negotiation, whence resulted a certain demand for Pledges of good Faith” The Second is “Can it be believed that a Man who should profess a hatred or Contempt of the French...
John Adams with his Consort and their Family desire prayers that the death of a grandchild may be Sanctified to them. They also request your Prayers for their Children and grand Children, in remote Countries abroad and distant parts at home, that thir Lives and health may be preserved from dangers by Sea and land and in due time returned in Safety to their Country and their Friends. ICN .
You very well know, that the Publication of my Letters in Pamplets and Numbers, was a project of your own, without any previous Knowledge or Consent of mine. You had an undoubted write right to do this or to make any this Use of them or any other you pleased; because I had given them to you and to the World. But in your “Introductory Remarks by the Publishers” to the first number you have...
I know not how to acknowledge the date of your last Letter to me. one thing I know, that it is not so ancient as the date of our Friendship, that commenced with our first knowledge of each other, and has Subsisted undiminished through all the various Scenes through which each of us have passed I may add in a long Life in a checkerd State from the juvenile days of Caliope & diana, to the...
Sleten village— light house Sophienberg—Palace Hveen island— Taurek Landscrona Weh beg —Paper Mills—English landing Scots berg port—Leather—red roof’d houses. Paper Mills— Tarbäck— Hermitage—an old royal summer house MHi : Adams Papers.
Permit me, Madam, to lay before you these few lines put together at your request. You may indeed in some sort be considered as the author of them, for the plan is almost entirely your own and the small merit I have to claim in them is merely that of working on your design. They do not vie with the productions of the immortal masters of the art: you will find however as I trust, that they have...
There are feelings of such a nature, as no language is adequate to express, and it is only such hearts as the President, and yourself possess, that are capable of defining; and fully understanding, the grateful feelings with which mine at this moment swells; vain indeed, would be any attempt, to convey an idea of the gratitude inspired for so essential a benefit, and to that God alone, from...
Yesterday your father received a letter from William. We rejoice to learn that you are well; and I have the pleasure to inform that we are all getting better, and that I intend to dine below to-day. I congratulate you that the embargo is like to be raised. I hope the non-intercourse bill will be lost; and the merchantmen send out frigates to convoy the trade, molest no one, and defend...
96. à James Madison 10 Reçu pour compte de Todd 234.54 MdBS .
13Memorandum Books, 1809 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 2. Printer’s carrier .50. Lemaire’s accts. Dec. 3. to Dec. 31. 08     provns.  servts. ice cont. total   meat buttr. eggs veget.    
Analysis of the Nicotiana latifolia. By M. Vauquelin . translated by D. B. Warden . Though we cannot doubt that the different methods in the preparation of tobacco modify the principles contained in this plant, it is nevertheless certain that the changes which these principles undergo do not entirely destroy their particular properties; for if this were not so, it is evident that we could also...
Analysis of Snuff of the Hôtel Longueville —By Mr Vauquelin . In occupying myself in this research, my object was to know whether the principles discovered in the green Nicotiana also exist in the prepared tobacco; and if not, to find out what kind of change it undergoes. I also hoped to discover the substances employed in the preparation of snuff. 240 grammes of tobacco in powder washed five...
Memoranda for the President Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the...
Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the officer commanding at...
I know no other Apology for the Liberty I have taken than that of Dire Necessity and As I know you to be a man of few words I will proceed briefly to state my case to you I have been engaged all this Winter in writing a political pamphlet entitled Thoughts, on the Administration, of our late President, Thomas Jefferson. (Which I hope will meet with due encouragement from all true Republicans)...
Memoranda for the President. Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Gen l Dearborn to Col o Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. these orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the...
Thomas Jefferson Esq r To Jo s Dougherty D r D –cts To 40 30 bushels oats a 40 cts per bushel 12 –00 To a stable broom
I have yours of Feb. 20 and 23. The inclosed five sheets are the rough draught, which I have requested and you have promised to return. I shall burn it because I have made another Copy more correct in which I have left out the Name and much of the trumpery. In strictness, we have nothing to do with the question whether impressments of seamen are legal or illegal in England. Whatever Iniquity...
If I could dream as much Wit as you, I think I should wish to go to Sleep for the rest of my Life, retaining however one of Swifts Flappers to awake me once in 24 hours to dinner, for you know without a dinner one can neither dream nor Sleep. Your Dreams descend from Jove, according to Homer. Though I enjoy your Sleeping Wit and acknowledge your unequalled Ingenuity in your dreams, I cannot...
Your letter of the 21st arrived from Quincy this Morning and I can only assure you in answer that your Mother is much better and that Charles is very well. you may therefore spare yourself any farther anxiety and hope to meet us soon in perfect health I merely write a few lines to satisfy your doubts concerning them and to express my regret at your cause not having come on when you expected...
It is with extreme Satisfaction that I do my self the honour to address you as President of these United States; to see Merit, Virtue & Benevolence thus rewarded, my gratefull heart cannot help to rejoice at; your indulgence & friendly Offices have saved me from ruin & my Duty & Inclination prompts me to pray to God Almighty that your health be adequate to the arduous task Providence has...
Mr Troups complts to Mr Madison—incloses a paper to which the names of several respectable gentlemen are subscribed—Mr T feels himself obliged to state to Mr M that he has taken this liberty with Dr Kirkpatrick without his knowledge & without the knowledge of any other with one exception than those whose signatures appear on it. Our friend Doctor Kirkpatrick retires from Congress under...
Unwilling to depart from examples, of the most revered authority, I avail myself of the occasion now presented, to express the profound impression made on me, by the call of my Country to the station, to the duties of which I am about to pledge myself, by the most solemn of sanctions. So distinguished a mark of confidence, proceeding from the deliberate and tranquil suffrage of a free and...
4 March 1809, New Boston, New Hampshire. Has invented a system of medicine that will cure soldiers and sailors “of all camp sicknesses” and seeks a government subsidy to manufacture and bottle his medicines. “I hope if I have done no other good by writing this letter it will be pleasing to your phylanthropick mind to be informed of the thriving of us[e]ful arts in our land so as to prevent the...
4 March 1809, Newark. Congratulates JM on becoming president and anticipates “the same moderate, prudent, & pacific course” as that pursued by Jefferson. Expresses regret that the times are “fraught with great peril” brought on by “the folly and arrogance of one belligerent, & the commercial cupidity of the other.” If the choice comes to “honorable war or tame submission, we hesitate not, to...
4 March 1809. With Dr. John Thomas presiding and Cornelius Comegys serving as secretary the citizens offer JM congratulations upon his taking “the presidential chair” and hail the continuance of republicanism as it was practiced under President Jefferson. “Although a wise and just policy has thus preserved us from the political vortex of Europe,” the war now waging there constitutes a threat...
Document not found. 4 March 1809, Lancaster, Kentucky. Acknowledged in JM to the chairman of the meeting, 29 Apr. 1809 . A set of resolutions lauding JM on his inauguration and expressing a willingness to support the administration against foes at home and abroad.