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M rs Leigh , who is I believe known to you, sent me some Time ago two Copies of her Book upon Government, with a Request that I would tender them to you on her Behalf as a Mark of her Respect.—I promised that I would do so; but missed the opportunity on which I had calculated.—At Length however I fulfil my promise and send the Books. I have not the Honour to know M rs Leigh personally.—She...
It was only a few Days ago that I had the Honour to receive your letter of the 5 th of August last by M r M c Rae .—I need not say that I shall be happy to shew that Gentleman every attention, and to do him every Service in my Power.— I cannot express to you how sensibly I feel the Kindness of the last paragraph of your Letter.—If any thing could have given give new Strength to the...
I had the Honour to receive a few weeks ago, the very acceptable Present of your Book on Livingston’s Claim, which I have read in part with great Attention, & intend to finish in a Day or two.—It has a Bearing upon a Cause in which I am concerned as Counsel in Maryland , and affords me Lights which certainly I had not before. As far as I have gone I find the Statements clear, and the Reasoning...
Judge Storey has touched, in the enclosed Letter to me, upon a Subject which I have myself often thought of—and which may soon become of primary Importance. I have not Time at this Moment to say any thing upon it, and I am sure that I could suggest nothing which has not already occurred to you; but I suppose it to be proper to submit the Judge’s Letter to your Perusal. I have the Honour to be,...
I am not able to tell you how much pleasure I have received from the kind Letter which you did me the Honor to send to me by Mr Forrest. When I have said that I consider it as a full Pledge of the Continuance of your good opinion & Regard, I have said every thing. My professional prospects here are as flattering as I could have hoped or desired; and they assure me that, if I am spared for a...
I have had the Honour to receive your kind Letter of the 21st. of April; and now send the last Edition of War in Disguise as you request. As we are turning our Attention to Wool, I have added a Tract lately published here on the Merino & Anglo-Merino Sheep, which may be of use. I trust that we shall continue to cultivate such Manufactures as suit our Circumstances. Cottons now, and Woollens...
I regret sincerely that my professional Engagements here are so pressing and importunate as to put out of my power to be where my Duty to you requires. I am sure, however, that you will make Allowances for me—especially when you are aware that I am not unmindful, though absent from the Seat of Government, of what I owe to the Strength and prosperity of your administration. The particular...
I thought it possible that the Hornet would touch at Cowes—although I gave no order to that Effect. But I did not expect that Mr. Spence wd. come up to Town, or that the Brig wd. be detained a Moment. My Despatches were sent to Mr Auldjo —to be delivered with the least possible Delay to Mr Spence on Board in Case Circumstances should render it proper for the Brig to call. Mr Spence, however,...
I beg your permission to mention to you that Mr. William Kilty calculates upon losing his office of Chancellor of Maryland, on account of federal ascendancy in that State, and that I have reason to believe he would be much gratified by having an opportunity of accepting the Station of Comptroller, which is said to be vacant. I believe Mr. Kilty is well known to you—and consequently that it is...
As Mr. Erving leaves Town early in the Morning and it is now past Midnight I have scarcely Time to do more than acknowledge the Receipt of your kind Letter by Dr Logan. In a few Days I will trouble you with a Letter of some Length. The newspapers will apprize you of the Violence & Injustice of France towards the U. S. I hope it will be found possible (at least until England does us Justice) to...
Letter not found. 27 June 1812, Baltimore. Offered for sale in Swann Auction Galleries Catalogue No. 469 (9 May 1957), item 301, which notes that the letter reads in part: “I have read great part of Mr. Jefferson’s Book on Livingston’s claim, and find it, as I had expected, a luminous & masterly production.”
I have only this Moment seen your obliging Invitation to Dinner for Monday last. It was left in the office of the Clerk of the Supreme Court and was delivered to me upon my coming into Court today. I gave a Sketch of the Clauses, which I undertook to draw, to the Chairman of the Committee of foreign Relations of the Senate, yesterday. The principal Clause will I suppose be offered as an...
I do not perceive that the General Government could well interfere upon the subject of the Letter, which you did me the Honour to enclose to me even if it were desirable that it should; but I am quite sure that it will be wholly unnecessary. There is no Disposition to Riot here except with a mere Handful of low people, who can and will be restrained by the Authority of the Majistracy of the...
I return you my sincere Thanks for your friendly Letter of the 23d. of May. Nothing could have been more acceptable than the Approbation which you are so good as to express of my Note to Ld. Wellesley on Jackson’s Affair. I wish I had been more successful in my Endeavours to obtain an unexceptionable Answer to it. You need not be told that the actual Reply was, in its plan & Terms, wide of the...
As I know you take an Interest in the Views & opinions of our Friends in England I take the Liberty to enclose a short Letter just received from Alexander Baring. There is not much in it—but it may be worth reading. I hope to be in Washington on Sunday next. With true Attachment I have the Honour to be—Dear Sir, respectfully your faithful & Ob Servant RC ( DLC ). Enclosure not found.
I beg Leave to say that I wrote on the 24h. Instant a Letter to you, explanatory of my Motives for a Request, contained in my Letter of the same Date, that I may be permitted to return to America. I mention this because, by an opportunity which now offers I send a Duplicate of my Letter to Mr. Smith, and have not Time to make a Duplicate of my Letter to you. I trust, however, that the original...
I have had the Honour to receive your Letter of the 17h. of March, and thank you sincerely for your kind Wishes. Permit me to offer you my cordial Congratulations upon the Manner in which you have been called to the Presidency. Such a Majority at such a Time is most honourable to our Country and to you. My Trust is that with the progress of your administration your Friends will grow in...
Will you permit me to make known to you a young Gentleman (Mr. Robert Walsh Junr. of Baltimore) for whom I have a particular Regard and whose extraordinary Merit will I am sure recommend him to your Notice & Esteem? I can truly say of him that he has the best Heart in the World—that he possesses a superiour Mind cultivated with Care, and informed by the most extensive Knowledge, and enriched...
The Case of Livingston ag’ Dorgenoy (formerly Marshall of the Territory of orleans) now depending before the Supreme Court of the U.S. involves some Questions of Importance to the Government—and I presume that it will be proper that I should argue them. The Case has been opened on the part of Livingston and the further Argument has been postponed to afford Time to Counsel to look fully into...
The proclamation of the 2d. of November is doing good here, and may perhaps bring this Ministry to Reason. I enclose Cobbets last Number, which touches upon our Relations with this Country, & Bell’s weekly Messenger of yesterday, which treats of the same Subject. My Letter to Ld. W. of the 10th. Instant wd. have gone into it more fully (though I was straightened for Time) but that I was afraid...
I had intended to write you a very tedious Letter; but I have no longer Time to do so—as it is now near 2. OClock in the Morning and Lieut. Elliott leaves Town at 10. A.M. My official Letter of the 21t. Inst. will apprize you of the Course finally taken by this Government in Consequence of Mr. Jackson’s Affair. I do not presume to anticipate your Judgment upon it. It certainly is not what I...
30 June 1812, Baltimore. Wishes to mention his “young Friend, John Hare Powell, who, now that War has been declared, is extremely anxious to obtain a Commission in the Army.” RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). 3 pp. Docketed by JM. Powell was appointed inspector general of the U.S. Army on 26 Dec. 1814 ( Heitman, Historical Register Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register and...
Your Letter of the 23d. of October reached me on the 25h. of last Month. That of the 23d. of April was sent to me by Mr. Lee as soon as he arrived in England; and was answered on the 19h. of August. I see with great pleasure the Ground taken by the Secy. of State in his Correspondence with Mr. Jackson, connected with the probability that our people are recovering from recent Delusion, and will...
I have received from Mr. Brougham, with whose high Character you are acquainted, the enclosed Letters for you and for myself. Mr Bentham sent me a parcel, which I will deliver in a few Days. Business requires my absence at Baltimore for a short Time—and as the Court is about to a[d]journ I intend to leave Washington Tomorrow. During my Absence I shall hold myself in Readiness to attend to any...
§ From William Pinkney and Others. 10 April 1815, Baltimore. “We beg leave to offer you our sincere Congratulations upon the Conclusion of an honorable Peace between the United States and Great Britain; and at the same time to express our unfeigned admiration of the enlightened Wisdom and patriotic Firmness by which your Conduct has been distinguished, during the extraordinary trials to which...
I had the Honour to receive, late last night , the Letter which you were so good as to write to me on the 12th., and at the same Time my Commission as Atty. General of the U. S. I shall not delay a moment in repairing to Washington after a few importunate Engagements here have been satisfied; and I hope to set out in a few Days. Permit me to thank you again for the great Kindness and Delicacy...
It has been mentioned to me as possible that the Gentleman who now holds the office of Marshall for the District of Columbia will on account of the State of his Health resign it, and that my Friend Mr. Tench Ringgold would in that Event wish to fill it. If this should be so I beg your Permission to second Mr. Ringgold’s wishes by an earnest reccommendation of him. He has indeed the honor of...
I send by this opportunity a Letter to the Secretary of State, entreating your permission to return to America. I have not thought it necessary to mention in that Letter my Motives for this apparently abrupt Request; but you will I am sure be at no Loss to conjecture them. I ask your Leave at this Time to close my Mission here because I find it impossible to remain. I took the Liberty to...
A Bill appears to have been introduced into the House of Representatives, the object of which is to make it the Duty of the Attorney General to be permanently at Washington. I find no fault with this Bill; but, as I am quite sure that my professional pursuits in Baltimore and Annapolis will render it impossible for me to comply with it, I beg Leave to tender to you the Resignation of my...
From the enclosed Extract from the “American” it would seem that our Consul at Lisbon has retired from his Station; and it is possible that he may not wish to return to it. If that should be so, will you permit me to mention my eldest Son (William) for your Consideration as his Successor in Case one shd. be appointed. He can have the best Recommendation from Merchants and others of all...