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The Constitution is at length arrived, and Mr: Russell informs me that she is to return to France before she will proceed to America; which will not probably be till some time in the Month of Janry. My Plan of embarking in her is by this means disconcerted; and the detail of Communication, that I was desirous of making personally, delayed. I am now strongly persuaded to defer my departure till...
It is long since I had the honor of addressing you; much longer since I had that of receiving a Line from you; the last being of the date of Janry 1811. I have very sudden notice of Mr: Carroll’s arrival and Departure; and write this in the Coffee House with him, without any opportunity of referring to or enclosing any papers save the printed section of the Pamphleteer No 8. which, if the...
I attended yesterday at the Court of Admiralty rather to hear what could be said than from any doubt of the result of the trial of the Somerset, captured during the war, and recaptured after the period assigned for exemption by the treaty. The Proctor for the Captor, whom I happened to know, assured me that he had not been able to find a case in point; which I did not think it difficult to...
I wrote you in great haste by Mr: Carroll, and cannot boast of much leisure on the present occasion, which was offered to me late last evening by a Gentleman intending to leave town tomorrow. I doubt if I shall be able to send you the Sequel of my Essays under the Signature of Conciliator having no Copy of the M.S. at hand; and the Editor of the Pamphleteer, who has lately been appointed to a...
27 June 1809, London. Appointed the American consul in Rotterdam, Joy has not taken his post. He has heard of the difficulties now thrown in the way of travelers trying to reach Holland. Encloses a letter telling of the uncertain status of neutral vessels, including American ships now in the Amsterdam port. Joy has applied for a passport through “the Court of Holland” instead of through Paris,...
I have just parted with Lord Sidmouth who after the recognition of a meeting some years ago, and the repetition of the same friendly disposition to the United States and reference to the same constitutional analogies, customs &c which I remember to have communicated to you at the time or since, proceeded to assert his right to be considered a friend of the United States, by adding that he had...
The Constitution is now daily expected at Cowes; and by her I hope to embark for the U.S. I am just now advised of a Bag at the N. York Coffee House for Letters to be sent by a fast sailing ship from Liverpool, and send this in the presumption that it may arrive before the Constitution. I am advised of the Condemnation of the Julian, Hercules, Catharine & Atlantic, (carried into Dantzic in May...
I have just parted from Mr Adams with whom I have had a tête à tête of five hours; and as he tells me the Neptune does not sail to morrow as reported, but on the contrary she will remain ’till the following Sunday, I shall send this by her to announce that the project, mentioned in my letter of the 12th of May, is at an end. Mr A. does not encourage it, thinks it would answer no valuable...
14 September 1810, Gothenburg. Has sent “copious Communications” to JM and to the secretary of state but vessels carrying them have been delayed by adverse winds. Requests JM to wait for the receipt of his letters before taking any measures or making any appointments relative to this region. RC ( DLC ). 1 p.
As I am prevented proceeding to Liverpool to embark in this ship only by a doubt lately suggested by Mr: Maury whether she will proceed or not; (tho’ I think, (and so does Mr: Russell,) that no conciliatory measures on the part of this Government, are likely to detain her for a freight;) I am not prepared with such Duplicates, and other Communications, as I should otherwise have sent in her....
Ca. 20 October 1810, Copenhagen. Reports that he arrived in Copenhagen on 11 Oct. and that he has had discussions and correspondence with the French minister and Danish cabinet officials on the subjects already mentioned in his letters of 7 Oct. and 8 Sept. The French minister asked him what he thought of the extension of the Continental System. Privately the minister admitted the absurdity of...
I have yet received no appointment from Lord Sidmouth since I wrote you on the 20th. Instant. I may have been mistaking in his saying he would write me on Sunday but I am sure he said the appointment would not pass this day and it is now ½ past 3 O’Clock. I have sent him the letter of yesterday of which I enclose copy & which I presume reached his hands within the last hour. Having a letter...
16 September 1810, Gothenburg. Has not yet had an answer from Saabye to the enclosure. Reports that he has been mortified by rumors “that Mr. Joy had no authority and could therefore be of no use” in protecting American ships in the Baltic. Discusses the methods of determining commissions paid by mercantile houses and the reasons for his preference of another Copenhagen firm over Saabye’s....
Contrary to the information of Mr Adams, the Neptune sailed on the 18th. Ult; and I shall send my letter of the 17th with this to the Isle of Wight; where I have some friends embarking for Boston. As things have turned out I could not but regret in a late conversation with Mr A. that the chance of such an effort had not been tried; and I ought perhaps to say that without giving any...
24 May 1809, London. Reports varied reactions from members of the American community in London to news of the Erskine agreement. In a postscript he adds: “the Committee of American Merchants have been apprised that Mr: Erskine had exceeded his instructions & the Govt: will not ratify his Agreemt:—since confirmed by two of the Committee whom I have seen.” RC , two copies ( DLC ). 4 pp. One copy...
If this should overtake, at Liverpool, my letter of yesterday, it will serve to correct an Error, which, as I did not read after writing it, escaped my notice. It passed unobserved also by the Copyist, who took it down as I wrote it, whom I asked, in my haste, if he had perceived any Mistake, and who assured me there was none. Instead of “ it would be repugnant,” I should have said “ my...
Of all the Events of this eventful period in which our lot is cast, that which has recently taken place is surely the most astonishing. To pretend not to be astounded at it would be an affectation of Stoicism beyond the Stupor of an American Indian. The Question of the Peace of Europe is as much afloat as ever; and how to speculate upon it, is really beyond all depth. The french military is...
7 October 1810, Gothenburg. Reports that his letter of 16 Sept. to JM had not left the port when he received the enclosed letter from Saabye. Finds Saabye’s reply personally satisfactory and is convinced that Saabye is a man of integrity; but is still at a loss how to proceed. Suspects that there is an effort to “conceal from our Countrymen the Object of my residence in these cold Regions.”...
I have just crossed the Sound in much better Health than when I left this place. You will perceive, in the concluding Paragraph of my letter to my Brother of the 21st. ultimo, that it was not my intention to cross the Atlantic very soon. Some Murmurs that have reached me have induced serious thoughts however of making the Voyage from this place; and further consideration, to take England in my...
5 October 1809, Gothenburg, Sweden. Transmits copy of his letter to JM of 9 Sept. Awaits in Gothenburg the arrival of “the Documents necessary to support my Pretensions,” which have been delayed by irregular mail and wartime interruptions. If he does not receive papers within forty-eight hours, proposes proceeding to Copenhagen without them. The wind and weather make it possible that the...
3 August 1809, London. Encloses draft of a memorial to the king of Denmark and Norway protesting Danish depredations on U.S. shipping. These attacks on “no less than fifty four ships” are the latest object of Joy’s attention and diverted him from taking up his post as American consul in Holland. The American minister in London has advised him “to deviate from his intended Voyage [to Holland]...
31 May 1809, London. Has read the parliamentary debates on the Erskine agreement, which “are best reported in the Chronicle.” No doubt JM is better informed “than we can be here.” Encloses a copy of the instructions accompanying the 26 Apr. revision of the orders in council, as well as his letter to Canning in which Joy expresses his disappointment at the foreign secretary’s adamant stand...
I have sometimes been induced, after writing, to pass a Letter under your Eye. The enclosed however, tho’ containing some expressions that would not have been used in a direct Correspondence, has been written in that intention. It is perhaps all that I shall have time to say on the subject of which it treats; and as it’s duplicate, barring accidents, will reach America about the same time;...
The delay of Mr: Welles by contrary winds enables me to add to my Letter of the 19th four other numbers of my Conciliator Vizt: Ns 5, 6, 7 and 9. If farther delay should occur I shall forward the remainder which are copying for that purpose. Always very respectfully Dr sir Your most obedt servt: RC and enclosures ( DLC ). RC docketed by JM . Joy enclosed manuscript copies of his “Conciliator”...
9 June 1811, Copenhagen. Reports arrival on 30 May of Erving who gave him JM’s letter of 28 Jan. The documents he sent to JM and the secretary of state will show how he protracted the most important cases until Erving’s arrival, and he has no doubt decisions can be delayed “till Mr: Erving has had sufficient opportunity to confer with Count Rozenkrantz.” His own conversation with the latter...
8 March 1809, London. He has written Lord Grenville regarding inconsistencies in the parliamentary debates over the naval blockade, the enforcement of which has exceeded “the rule of the War of 1756.” He attended the debates where Rose and Canning spoke, the latter saying with “the most consummate Impudence” that he would not discuss the state of American negotiations. Joy took “copious Notes”...
Leaving Town for a few days I sent to Lord Sidmouth the letter of which I take the liberty to enclose copy herein. I returned on the 11th. Instant & found a card of Mr Russell subjoining a request in pencil that I would call on him on my return. My letters have been regularly sent me; but of this card I knew nothing though it had lain a week at my lodgings and on calling I found he had left...
The inclosed will shew you the cause and the sole cause, of my continuing ’till this time in England. The magnitude of the object and the encouragement of some friends have induced this attempt, against my own opinion of any advantage being derived from it. And to the general discouragement, arising from the prejudices complained of therein, I have an addition in a note this moment received...
I have just heard of an opportunity of sending the enclosed Duplicates, by a fast sailing Vessel from Dover. Should both Copies arrive, one will be sufficient to transmit to Mr. Benjn. Joy. Always very respectfully, Dr. sir, Your friend & Servt. The 1sts. are in the Nabby: Care of Mr. Gelston. DLC : Papers of James Madison, Rives Collection.
Though the debates of last evening exhibiting the pitiful and undignified manner in which Ministers are retreating from the Orders in Council, after the sordid principles upon which they have endeavoured to sustain them, give little encouragement to the hope of any beneficial consequences; I think it right to inform you that I have an appointment with Lord Sid-mouth at one O’Clock to morrow...