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    • Gerry, Elbridge
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    • Madison, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Gerry, Elbridge" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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I am honored, dear Sir, by your letter of the 14th. instant in answer to mine of the 20th of february, stating, that “tho you do not enter into the aptitude of all my observations, you perceive in them a very interesting veiw of our public affairs.” Since the adoption of those measures, the relaxation of Government, in regard to the embargo, has happily changed the phrenzy, excited by the last...
I have heard, Dear Sir, with no small surprize, that charges have been preferred against Doctor Waterhouse, for misconduct as physician of the U. S. marine hospital at Charleston. I have been intimately acquainted with the Doctor for thirty years, so far at least as to have been able to form for myself, a correct opinion, which has ever been a respectful one, of his moral, political, &...
From some circumstances which have come to my knowledge, I am induced to think, that measures are adopted to shake the confidence of Government, in their district attorney, George Blake Esqr. If so, the grounds are said to be, his having had in his office, a brother, & his having associated with native & foreign gentlemen, of different politicks . I regret exceedingly, that reports of this...
The death of Judge Cushing, having produced a vacancy which must soon be filled, the general expectation in this quarter, I find is, that George Blake Esqr will be his successor. It is grounded, On the professional character of that Gentleman, which is supposed to be paramount to that of any person in this State, who can be a candidate for that office; On ten years practice in the federal...
On the 22d of Sepr last, I had the honor of addressing you a letter, on the subject of a candidate to supply the vacancy, caused by the death of Judge Cushing; & also of one for the office of district attorney, if that should be vacant by the promotion of the present incumbent. Being then in haste, I had omitted to mention, that my Son in law, by the appointment of Governor Sullivan, had...
I have read your message, with great attention & pleasure. It is clear, candid, firm & dignified, & cannot fail of convincing G Britain, that your object is just, your demands are reasonable, & that you will support them at all events. In this resolution, you will unite the eastern part of the nation; except british subjects, traders & partizans, who in case of a conflict, would soon...
The late President Adams communicated to me yesterday, in a friendly interveiw at my house, the enclosed extract of a letter; & expressed great apprehension, that if all the propositions, for enforcing the non intercourse act, should be adopted, they will overthrow the republican governments of the New England States & make them compleatly federal. The searching houses, as proposed before the...
I addressed a line to you yesterday on a minor subject; at this time, my mind is intent on a very important point. It has been confidentially communicated to me, that there are two revolutionary officers on the list of candidates for the office of Commander in chief of the national Army; Governor Hull & General Brooks. Governor Hull & General Dearbo[r]n were in my mind the most prominent...
31 December 1811, Boston Council Chamber. Introduces Richard Devens Harris—“a young Gentleman of this place & of one of the most respectable families in it, of a liberal education, & of correct morals & politicks”—who wishes to pay his respects. “Mr Harris having spent two or three years at London, Paris &c has obtained much useful information; which qualifies him to serve his Country in many...
The Count de Crillon, son of the celebrated Duke, who beseiged Gibralter, & was famous as a great mi[li]tary character, arrived here a day or two past, & proposes to go on to Washington. He came from England in company with Captain Henry, formerly of our army; whom you probably know, is also a great military character, & in every point, truly respectable. He wishes to pay his personal respects...
I addressed, at the request of some Gentlemen, a line to you yesterday, introducing the Count de Crillon to your Excellency; and think it expedient to inform you, that I am in every respect uninformed in regard to the politicks of that nobleman, he being to me an entire stranger. Respectfully your Excellency’s unfeigned Friend RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Later docketed by JM,...
J. A. Henry Esq, who formerly commanded a company of Artillery of the U States, wishing to pay his respects to your Excellency, I take the liberty to introduce him to your acquaintance; as a Gentleman who has resided heretofore in this State & who for his professional, literary, & polite accomplishments, has been much respected by all his acquaintance. Accept, I pray you, dear Sir, assurances,...
I have heard with concern that the Yazoo Company in this State have agreed to divide their lands into small parcells, to locate & to dispose of them, under the title confirmed by the Judiciary of the UStates. His Excellency Governor Hull being fortunately here on a visit, & informed of this proceeding, has endeavoured to stop it; from a conviction of unpleasant consequences; & has also...
I have the honor to enclose a Resolve of the Legislature of this Commonwealth, respecting a supply of blankets & cloathing, for the information of your Excellency, &, if you think proper, of Congress; & to assure you, that with the highest esteem & respect I remain your Excellency’s obedt Sert RC and enclosure ( DLC ). RC docketed by JM. For enclosure (2 pp.), see n. 1. Gerry enclosed a report...
The injuries which have resulted to me, by filling the office of Chief Magistrate of this Commonwealth; in consequence of the great expence thereof, of the smallness of the salary, & of the neglect of my private concerns—The state of the banks, in which is locked up, a great part of the circulating medium of the country—And other concurrent, unfortunate public & private events, have rendered...
On the 21st instant, I received a letter from the Secretary of War of the 15th, for detaching, pursuant to your directions, ten thousand of the militia of this Commonwealth; & immediately gave orders to the Adjutant General to make the arrangement, & to the Secretary to convene the Council, lest their aid may have been wanted. This day I have issued General Orders for compleating this...
I have been honored by your letter of the 9th, & having heard of two instances only, in which is manifested a disposition to embarrass the detachments, I flatter myself they will be generally successful. When I came into office there were seven federal of eleven Major Generals, & now there are but six of seventeen; being the number of existing militia divisions. The increase I effected as an...
In a letter which I addressed to You yesterday, I omitted to mention, that you have the entire confidence of the republicans in this quarter. They veiw with deep regret, every attempt of a few of the republican party to supplant you; with indignation, the proffered support of the federalists to your competitor; & with grief, the division, small as it is, which has been the result: but you may...
22 May 1812, Cambridge. “The letter enclose[d], I recd, from Colo Sherburne of Newport, an old revolutionary Officer. He has been always respected as a Soldier, a Gentleman & man of honor. I am not informed of his politicks, but if the office he applies for in the war department should be conferred on him, he would undoubtedly discharge it With fidelity.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 94,...
I am this day favoured by your highly esteemed letter of the 3d. We are informed that the House have passed the Rubicon; God grant to the Senate the same Wisdom & fortitude. Our anxiety is great, in a State of such awful Suspense; but we have great confidence in a majority of its members. On the 1st of May last I addressed a letter to our mutually revered Friend Mr Jefferson; & not having...
War is declared, God be praised, Our Country is safe. But great care & caution, at this Time is necessary. The Castle, I understand, is under a Captain’s command, & he a Federalist; with a single company of Artillerists; & may be carried by a coup de main. This Prospect is the tory plan, as the best stratagem to change the Government. The Governor, I am informed, obstinately refuses the...
I addressed a line to you on the 5th, & am happy to learn that Colo Porter has the command of Fort Independence; that he has upwards of three hundred men; & that he is daily receiving reinforcements. Sure I am, that nothing will be wanting on the part of the Republicans in this State, to aid General Dearborn, & to promote the veiws & orders of the national Government. It is impossible to say,...
Since my recovery from indisposition, I have had an interview with General Dearborn, who informed me that he was soon to depart from Boston; & being informed by him of the state of our Castle, I enquired what was to prevent the Enemy, if apprized of our defenceless situation, from embarking all its regular troops at Nova Scotia, in transports trusting its defence for a short period to their...
If there is any medical, or other office, which is or may soon be vacant, in or near Boston, it cannot as I conceive be so well applied, as by giving it to Doctor Waterhouse. His history is singular. He has been a Professor thirty years, in our University, & this has long been in the hands of high federalists; such as Ch. Jus. Parsons, the “Boston Rebel,” & similar men. The Doctor was in the...
Our late Secretary, Benjamin Homans Esqr will have the honor of paying his respects, & presenting this to you. His object is to obtain some place, in which he may be employed for the mutual benefit of himself & the Publick. The Consulate to which he was lately appointed would not have enabled him to subsist himself, & his Family. His success in the present pursuit, would afford great pleasure...
I have read, my dear Sir, with inexpressible pleasure, your message to Congress; embracing, in my veiw of it, every important point, & every requisite observation thereon, compatible with elegant precision. Had Congress adjourned to an earlier period, this important document would have probably had a salutary influence on the elections. I observe with pleasure, that there is soon, to be a...
I am happy, extremely so, in the prospect of your re-election; for the reverse of this would, in my mind, have given to G Britain, a complete triumph over our most meritorious administration, & Legislature, & Would have been considered by her, & probably by all Europe, as a sure pledge of the Revocation of our Independence. If the issue of the Election should be such, as is here anticipated by...
I had the honor on the 12th, to address a line to you, requesting information whether there probably will be a Session of Congress or of the Senate on the 4th of march next, & if so, of what duration? The principal object of this enquiry was to ascertain, in case of the success of the republican ticket for President & Vice President, & of no Session of Congress, or of the Senate on the day...
Accept my sincere thanks for your friendly favor, without date; & for the cheerful manner of your meeting my request. At the time prescribed, & before the District Judge & a circle of my friends, I propose to take the oath, agreably to your information; unless it should be requisite, for public purposes, to be then at Washington, in which event I shall claim no indulgence. Nothing delights me...
9 February 1813, Cambridge. “The bearer John Appleton Esqr, one of the Consuls of the U.States, is a neighbour of mine, & proposes to pay his respects to you at Washington. His object, as he informs me, is to express his readiness, as he has much leisure time, to occupy it in any public employment which may be for the mutual benefit of the Publick & himself, in this quarter. Mr Appleton is a...