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Documents filtered by: Author="Dallas, Alexander James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That he has examined the various documents which Mr Tatham has exhibited; and which have been the subject of examination at several antecedent periods, by the Department of War, and by Committees of Congress. That from these documents, it sufficiently appears, that Mr. Tatham has, for many years...
§ Alexander J. Dallas to Sister Marie Olivier. 17 June 1815, War Department. “General Jackson has been so good as to transmit to me a copy of the letter which you addressed to him, relative to the exchange of lands with the Ursuline nuns of New Orleans, as authorised by an act of Congress, passed on the 23 d. of April, 1812. I very much regret that the exchange was not effected in time to...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That the menaces of the Indians throughout the Indian Countries, require immediate attention; and among the means which are proper for restoring harmony, preserving peace, and defeating the arts employed by intrusive traders to generate Indian hostilities, it is recommended that there be immediately...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the united States: That the appropriations for the pay, the Subsistence and the Quarter Masters Department, of the army of the united States for the years 1814 & 1815, are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects; and that it has become necessary for the public Service, that a portion of the monies appropriated...
Mr. Monroe being absent, the President requested me to receive a visit from the chevalier de Onis, in consequence of that gentleman’s letter, expressing a desire to present his credentials, as Minister Plenipotentiary of the King of Spain, and to report the result. The Chevalier called on me about Six o’clock in the evening and observing that Mr. Pleasonton had intimated the President’s...
The acting Secretary of War, has the honor to represent to the President of the united States: That the appropriations for the Salary of the Commissary General, and for the Militia of the united States, for the years 1814 & 1815, are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects, and that it has become necessary for the public Service that a portion of the monies appropriated for other...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That the menaces of the Indians throughout the Indian Country, require immidiate attention; among the means which are proper for restoring harmony, preserving peace, and defeating the arts employed by intrusive traders, to generate Indian hostilities; and with a view, also, of ameliorating the...
Major O’Connor’s curious paper is certainly very ill calculated to promote his views. After way-laying me at my lodgings, at the Treasury &c for a month, he wrote me a letter on Saturday night, which I delivered to Mr. Graham, with a request that it might be sent under a cover to you. On Sunday morning, I told the Major that I had done so; but that I was satisfied you would not take the...
The intelligence from the Indian countries confirms the opinion, which I had formed of the necessity of an explicit understanding with the British Government, on all the questions of trade and intercourse between its subjects, and the Indians within our territory. The excitement is more general, than I can reccollect it to have been, at any former period; and, if London is to be the scene of...
I have the pleasure of acknowledging the reciept of your letter of the 24. inst. I hope you will be able to enjoy the calm of Montpelier until the close of October. It does not appear probable, that the return of our Envoys will render it necessary to change the scene. Their protracted absence, and unconscionable silence, authorise a conjecture, that they have been negotiating with the British...
The business of Fort Washington is a bad one. The inclosed papers will shew, that there is no plan, no responsibility, no honesty. I do not mean to inculpate Major L’Enfant, on the score of honesty; but his strange course of conduct is embarrassing in the extreme, and will render it impossible to give any explanation to Congress. If you approve of my report on the subject, be so good as to...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That having suspended the works at Fort Washington, and directed an Engineer to survey and report their actual condition in conformity with the Presidents instructions, the enclosed report and documents upon the subject, have been recently received. That under the existing circumstances, when the...
I enclose a rough sketch of a letter to Genl Jackson. The nature of the subject, and the character of the man, have made it difficult to address him. After several essays, I have thought it best to take him at his word, that he acted from necessity; and to distinguish the law of necessity from the law of the land. Be so good as to favor me with instructions and amendments. The Neptune arrived...
I can gather no news from the Officers of the Neptune worth communicating. Mr. Crawford has told you all that is important of our own affairs, and of the affairs of Europe when he left it. The newspapers will tell you, as soon as this letter can reach you, of the dreadful battle of the 15, 16, 17. & 18: of June. The carnage must have exceeded anything in the history of battles. The Duke of...
The inclosed paper gives, it is alledged, the sequel of the battle of the 18: of June, between Bonaparte and the Allies. The report, in the extent stated, is doubted here; but I think it probable, that Bonaparte’s repulse will produce something like a test of his popularity at Paris. I have written to Mr. Crawford, but no answer has been recieved. It may be, that he is on his way to visit you....
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to represent to the President of the United States, That he has received from the Mayor of the City of New-York, a letter dated the 3d. instant, to which the answer dated the 7: instant has been given, relative to the American Seamen, who have arrived in Cartels from England, and are exposed to great want, being destitute of pecuniary funds: And that...
I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 10. instant. The silence of the Ministers in London is to me inexplicable. Mr. Gallatin has even ceased to write to his family. Every vessel that arrives, however, confirms the report of a negotiation. The downfall of Bonaparte will again reduce the questions of impressment, of blockade, and of the Colonial trade, to...
The arrival of several Bremen vessels at Baltimore, has put the claim of entry on American duties into action. The letter, which I have received on the subject, and my answer to it, will be transmitted, under cover, from Washington, for your information. The British Government contracted with a Mr Jacobs for Cartels, to bring our seamen from England to the United States. The owners of the...
The arrival of several Bremen vessels at Baltimore, has put the claim of entry on American duties into action. The letter, which I have received on the subject; and my answer to it, will be transmitted, under cover, from Washington, for your information. The British Government contracted with a Mr Jacobs for Cartels, to bring our seamen from England to the United States. The owners of the...
I have received your letter of the 13h. instant, relative to the distressed Seamen in New-York. I had previously put the business upon the footing, which you recommend; and informed the Mayor, that seamen in the public service would find relief from the Naval commander at the New-York station; that seamen belonging to Privateers, or merchant vessels, might easily find employment; but that, in...
The inclosed Register contains the latest news from Europe. The termination of Bonaparte’s political life, is in character with its progress. There are two accounts of Mess. Gallatin and Clay; one sends them to Philadelphia in the Electra; and the other sends them to New-York in the Ship Lorenzo. It is affirmed in a Paris paper, that they sailed in the latter vessel on the 22d. of July. The...
On my arrival at New-York, I was attacked with a fever; and although I saw Mr. Gallatin and Mr. Clay, I was not able to write to you, that they had, at last, reached the United States. I presume, however, that they have written to you themselves; and that by the hands of Mr. Cutts, you have received the Commercial Treaty, with the correspondence relating to it. The Treaty does not contain any...
On my arrival at New-York, I was attacked with a fever; and although I saw Mr. Gallatin and Mr. Clay, I was not able to write to you: that they had, at last, reached the United States. I presume, however, that they have written to you themselves; and that by the hands of Mr. Cutts, you have received the commercial Treaty, with the correspondence relating to it. The Treaty does not contain any...
On my return from New-York, I received your favor of the 2d. instant, and the copy of Mr. Crawford’s letter on the question of brevet rank. I can add nothing, by way of information on public points, to the last communication of the talk of our Commissioners. Mr. Gallatin has, probably, written to you at large, on all that relates to the mission. As to his future pursuits, he has left me...
I have received your favor of the 8: instant. Having heard from Messrs. Gallatin & Clay the contents of the Commercial Treaty, as well as their opinion upon the necessity of a special call of the Senate to ratify it, I was prepared to express to Mr. Rush, in compliance with your request, a decision against the call. Your letter anticipates the principal reasons of the decision. I will only...
The inclosed letters from Mr. Adams shew the impracticability of selling the Stock in Europe, within the limits which were prescribed. It is indispensable, however, to provide for the reimbursement of the heavy advances of Mess: Barings in London, and for the advance of Messr. Willincks in Amsterdam. It is time, also, to make arrangements for paying the dividends on the Louisiana stock in...
Since writing to you yesterday, I have received the inclosed letter from Mr. Baring, which will give you a distinct view of our situation with the Bankers in London. Every Mail brings me additional accounts of the rise in exchange, and, indeed, of the extreme difficulty of procuring good Bills. The importance of reinstating our credit, by payment of the advances, which have been so handsomely...
Since my report was forwarded to you, I have had the pleasure of discharging the temporary loan of 500,000 Dollars, long due to the State Bank at Boston. The reduced amount of the outstanding Treasury Notes, has produced the effect intended. The Notes are rapidly mounting to par; and you will have the pleasure of seeing the public engagements paid in gold & silver, or Bank notes convertible...
At the request of M r Isaac Briggs , I take the liberty of asking you to state your reccollection of the facts represented by that gentleman in the inclosed letter, relative to the subject of his Petition, referred by the Senate to this Department. I have the honor to be, with every Sentiment of respect and attachment, Sir, Y r mo. obed Sev t RC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “The Honble Thomas...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honour to lay before the President of the United States the annual report of David Shriver, Jun. the superintendant of the western road from Cumberland to the river Ohio. The Secretary having respectfully submitted to the President propositions for accelerating the completion of this great national work, deems it proper, upon the present occasion, to add...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the President a revised copy of the circular addressed to the collectors of the customs for carrying the act of Congress and the commercial convention with Great Britain into effect, together with Mr. Monroe’s opinion on the subject. The revisal is made to conform to the suggestions of the President’s note, except in relation to the...
The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom the President of the United States referred the resolution of the 10th of February, 1816, requesting that there might be laid before the House of Representatives "such of the accounts of James Thomas, late a deputy quarter master general of the United States, as relate to the purchases made, or expenses incurred, under any order of General Smyth, in the...
Mr. Dallas respectfully states to the President that Mr. William Gamble has been appointed by the Secretary of War to receive from the British commander a surrender of Fort Michilimackinac, and Mr. Gamble is ready to proceed to the execution of his trust. Mr. Dallas recommends, also, that Mr. Gamble should be appointed collector at Michilimackinac. Mr. Abbot, who was formerly collector, has...
19 March 1816 Mr. Barker seems to think that there is a personal severity shown to him in the treatment of his applications to the treasury. There is no foundation for the opinion. His bills have returned protested for non-payment, and suits are instituted to recover the principal, damages, etc. He offers to pay the principal, interest, and costs if the claim to the damages shall be released....
The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom the President of the United States referred the resolution of the 29th February, 1816, requesting that there be laid before the House of Representatives "a statement of the cases in which he has employed, or caused to be employed, counsel to assist the Attorney General prosecuting causes in the Supreme Court of the United States, stating, as nearly as may...
The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom the President of the United States referred the resolution of the 26th of March, 1816, requesting that information be laid before the Senate "in relation to such proceedings as have been had for completing an accurate chart of the coast within the extent of twenty leagues from any of the shores of the United States, and in relation to such examinations...
The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully submits to the President, the answer which he proposes to give to the Committee of Foreign relations, on the reference of the Petitions respecting the West-India trade, and the Plaister trade. He thinks, that it would be premature to commence a commercial warfare; but, at all events, the facts, respecting the British regulations, are not sufficiently...
As it is not my intention to pass another winter in Washington, I think it a duty to give you an opportunity, to select a successor for the office of Secretary of the Treasury, during the present session of Congress. I will cheerfully remain, however, if you desire it, to put the National Bank into motion; presuming that this object can be effected before the 1st. of October next. Permit me,...
The Cumberland road.progresses than I expected...The report is that Mr. Shriver will be tempted to resign his charge for employment under a Company in Maryland. It will be difficult to supply his place, though his slow march has been censured. Col. Williams estimates his services at too high a price; and there are other reasons for confining his share in the work to a temporary engagement. I...
Your instructions relative to Fort Harrison, and the reservation of the land in its neighborhood, have been carried into effect. I hope now to be able to put the business of the Cumberland road, as well as the business of the Survey of the coasts, into a course of execution, without troubling you again. The consultation on the Resolution of Congress, respecting the currency, will be attended...
The communications from the Departments of State and the Navy, will give you a great deal of interesting intelligence. The Algerine business requires decision; and yet, in the affair of the Brig you have a delicate case to act upon. The Dey has always considered the restitution of the prizes, as a part of the negotiation; and though we considered the promise as merely gratuitous, it was a...
At a meeting at the Department of State, Mr. Monroe brought under consideration the Algerine case, and the case of the Whaling vessels in the Pacific. He will communicate the result in both cases; but I find, upon an explanation, that only one of the Whaling vessels is known to have been seized by the Spaniards, though there are 24 at risque. The dispatch from Mr. Harris is an unpleasant one;...
The inclosed report gives you the result of our consultation on the Resolution of the 29. of April 1816. I entertained a doubt, for a moment, upon the power of the Treasury to make a discrimination in the terms of paying different descriptions of public debt and duties. I am satisfied, however, upon reflection, that the arrangment is indispensable for the accommodation of the country; and as...
Upon reflection, I think it best to proceed with the Circular to the State Banks, and to issue the Notes, for the payment of the Treasury Notes, which are due in New-York. I ought not to anticipate a failure in the revenue, by the delinquency of the merchants; nor can I perceive any power in the Treasury Department to interfere for their relief. The case is not at all, like the case of a...
I send, for your consideration, Govr. Plumer’s recommendation of his Son, to succeed Mr. Gardner, whose resignation of the Loan oOffice in New-Hampshire, was forwarded a few days ago. Mr. Smith, the Marshal of New-York, is dead, and you will, I presume, be harrassed with applications for the Office. I am, Dr. Sir, most respectfully & faithfully, Yr. obed Serv. CSmH .
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the President, a copy of his letter to the Auditor of the Treasury, respecting the settlement of Mr. Hassler’s accounts, which will require the President’s approbation. CSmH .
On the day of my departure from Washington, the Heads of Departments assembled at Mr. Monroe’s office, and considered all the subjects, which you had referred to them. Mr. Monroe will communicate the result to you; together with a statement of the measures suggested, in relation to Mr. Kusloff’s case. There is no business to trouble you with, from the Treasury; and there is neither foreign,...
The Act of the 30. of April 1816 appropriates 250,000 Dollars for Custom-House establishments. It will, probably, be a sum sufficient for the five principal commercial Cities; but I have not received satisfactory information from any Collector, but the Collector of Boston, upon whose report I now transmit to you an official statement, which you will be so good as to return with your directions...
I have received your favor of the 4. instant; and shall alter the Circular on the currency, in the way which you suggest. The receipt of several additional reccommendations for the Loan Office in New-Hampshire, induces me to suspend an application for the Commission in favor of Mr. Plumer, until you have seen the doccuments now sent. I do not anticipate, however, a change in your instructions....
I trouble you with a draft of the agreement with Mr. Hassler relative to the survey of the coast. The work is an important one, and must require both time and money to complete it. I am confident that Mr. Hassler is the only person equal in all respects to the undertaking, within the reach of the government. The circular to the banks is prepared for issuing, and the prospect of an accumulation...