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Documents filtered by: Author="Dallas, Alexander James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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I have just time to inclose the final report of the Board of Officers. There is no additional intelligence from Europe. There is nothing new here. Many of the Officers have left Washington; and, upon the whole, I think that our Military arrangements will produce less discontent and clamour, than was anticipated. I am, Dr Sir, most respectfully & faithfully Yrs. RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM . For...
The Board of General Officers expressed a wish to be discharged; and I thought some advantage would be derived from their separation, while you were deliberating on their reports. I have, therefore, written to them a letter of thanks, in your name, and they will, probably, leave Washington tomorrow. With the materials, which they have furnished, and your instructions, I have no doubt that we...
Your letter to Mr. Monroe has been the subject of several conversations; and we have agreed, 1°. That the Army should be discharged, for the reasons which you state, and the reasons suggested in my last letter to you. 2d. That the Squadron should sail, under private and confidential instructions to watch every appearance of danger in Europe, and to avoid surprize by any hostile force. The...
The Acting Secretary of War has the honor to submit to the President of the United States, the following report: That the Act of Congress entitled “An Act fixing the military peace establishment of the United States,” passed on the 3d. of March 1815, provided that after the Corps constituting the peace establishment was formed and completed, the Supernumerary officers noncommissioned officers,...
I send a report on the organization of the peace establishment for your consideration. The first General Order proposed, is, also, sent; the second General Order will conform, with some slight exceptions to the Report of the Board; and the remaining two General orders will be in substance what the report states. I will forward them to you, as fast as I can put them into form; but if you...
On reflection, I have thought it right to recommend some additions and alterations in the plan submitted to you for organizing the army. 1. To transport the troops from place to place before they are formed into brigades will require more assistance in the quartermaster’s department. I propose, therefore, retaining provisionally, Samuel Brown (the general’s brother), deputy...
I am anxious to make our Army arrangement satisfactory, without taking too great a latitude in the discretion left to the Executive. I am afraid Genl. Jackson will be mortified, if Major Butler and Major Hayne are not noticed in some part of our arrangement; and I think we can manage the matter safely, by allowing an Adjutant General (Major Butler) to be provisionally retained for the Division...
I have written to you already by this day’s mail; but one more alteration in the Army list is desireable. Major Cutler is an excellent Officer, a modest man, and much esteemed. He has been in service 8 years; but has not enjoyed an opportunity of becoming conspicuous in the field. He will be content with a Company, and the brevet. I must add, that he is very poor. If you approve of it, I can...
I am waiting for your return of the Army report, in order to take definitive measures for the disbandment. I am in hopes, that the Officers will be less disatisfied, than was anticipated; and that the arrangement will not be objected to, by any disinterested man. It would be impossible to complete the payment and discharge by the 1°. of June, and I propose giving a latitude, with reference to...
The organization of the Army is now completed, and it will be published in the National Intelligencer of Monday. Perhaps, I shall be able to send you a copy of it tomorrow, or the next day. It will be some satisfaction to you to hear, that on reading to Col. Aspinwall and Col. Jessup, in confidence, the Army Register, that I might ⟨enbibe⟩ some idea of the probable effect of the selection,...
The inclosed letter from General Jackson shows that Fort Bowyer has been restored, without difficulty; but that the negroes taken near New Orleans are retained. There are no accounts from Niagara. I have sent by this mail the new Army Register, the general orders for effecting the organization of the peace establishment, and copies of my letters to Generals Jackson and Brown. These, together...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the consideration of the President of the United States, the petition of B. & J. Bohlen, praying a pardon for the offence of importing, unlawfully, a quantity of coffee, which was afterwards purchased by the petitioners in Baltimore, without any participation or notice of the illicit transaction. The letter of the late Attorney General,...
I have just received your letter, expressing a wish that Colonel Croghan’s resignation should be accepted; but the Army Register has been actually printed, including his name, for the reason which I assigned in my last letter. I think, however, you will not regret the occurrence when you observe that Major Taylor must have been promoted to a higher rank in order to take Colonel Croghan’s...
I have received the inclosed letters from Genl. Jackson and General Gaines. The former does not appear to have received any of our letters; and the latter has only received the letter, inviting him to Washington, or his answers have miscarried. There is a remarkable coincidence between Genl. Gaine’s, reccommendatory list, and the selections made here; and Lieut. Spotts, who is strongly...
In marshalling the appropriations, with a view to provide for subsistence and pay, during the current year, as well as to diminish the amount of debt, I think I can advantageously borrow into wag[e]s from the Ordonance Department: 1. By taking from the unexpended appropriation about the sum of   Dollars; and 2d. by selling a quantity of Gun-powder, for which we have no use, actual, or...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That the appropriations for the subsistence, for the Quarter Masters Department, for Arsenals, Magazines &c, Maps and plans, forage of Rangers, and Camp Equippage of the Army of the united States for the years 1814 & 1815; are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects; and that it has become...
I had prepared a letter to Genl. Brown, respecting the surrender of the Fort at Michillimackinac, before I received your favor of the 24. instant. Every consideration presses that object upon our attention; and an early possession must be insisted on, by all means, except force. If the delay continues until Mr. Monroe’s return, you will, perhaps, think it right to address Mr. Baker on the...
I inclose a report upon the expediency of selling a part of the Gunpowder, to which you will be so good as to subjoin your approbation. My friend Col. Johnstone spares no one, on the subject of Ward and Taylors contract. The truth is that by his assiduity, during the session of Congress, they fared much better than any other Contractors. They have actually received near 500,000 Dollars on...
A general question occurs: what is the effect of the Act of the 7. of February 1815 upon the powers and duties of the Secretary of the Navy? 1. The Act, by its own declaration, must not be construed to take from the Secretary of the Navy his controul and direction of the Naval forces of the United States, as previously possessed by law. Some powers of controul and direction were meant to be...
The acting secretary of war has the honor to represent to the President of the United States, That the Board of General officers recommended that the whole of the Garrison surgeons and surgeon’s mates should be retained in service, understanding them not to exceed two surgeons, and twenty surgeon’s mates; but in the execution of the Act fixing the military peace establishment, it was thought...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That he has examined the various documents which Mr Tatham has exhibited; and which have been the subject of examination at several antecedent periods, by the Department of War, and by Committees of Congress. That from these documents, it sufficiently appears, that Mr. Tatham has, for many years...
§ Alexander J. Dallas to Sister Marie Olivier. 17 June 1815, War Department. “General Jackson has been so good as to transmit to me a copy of the letter which you addressed to him, relative to the exchange of lands with the Ursuline nuns of New Orleans, as authorised by an act of Congress, passed on the 23 d. of April, 1812. I very much regret that the exchange was not effected in time to...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That the menaces of the Indians throughout the Indian Countries, require immediate attention; and among the means which are proper for restoring harmony, preserving peace, and defeating the arts employed by intrusive traders to generate Indian hostilities, it is recommended that there be immediately...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the united States: That the appropriations for the pay, the Subsistence and the Quarter Masters Department, of the army of the united States for the years 1814 & 1815, are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects; and that it has become necessary for the public Service, that a portion of the monies appropriated...
Mr. Monroe being absent, the President requested me to receive a visit from the chevalier de Onis, in consequence of that gentleman’s letter, expressing a desire to present his credentials, as Minister Plenipotentiary of the King of Spain, and to report the result. The Chevalier called on me about Six o’clock in the evening and observing that Mr. Pleasonton had intimated the President’s...
The acting Secretary of War, has the honor to represent to the President of the united States: That the appropriations for the Salary of the Commissary General, and for the Militia of the united States, for the years 1814 & 1815, are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects, and that it has become necessary for the public Service that a portion of the monies appropriated for other...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That the menaces of the Indians throughout the Indian Country, require immidiate attention; among the means which are proper for restoring harmony, preserving peace, and defeating the arts employed by intrusive traders, to generate Indian hostilities; and with a view, also, of ameliorating the...
Major O’Connor’s curious paper is certainly very ill calculated to promote his views. After way-laying me at my lodgings, at the Treasury &c for a month, he wrote me a letter on Saturday night, which I delivered to Mr. Graham, with a request that it might be sent under a cover to you. On Sunday morning, I told the Major that I had done so; but that I was satisfied you would not take the...
The intelligence from the Indian countries confirms the opinion, which I had formed of the necessity of an explicit understanding with the British Government, on all the questions of trade and intercourse between its subjects, and the Indians within our territory. The excitement is more general, than I can reccollect it to have been, at any former period; and, if London is to be the scene of...
I have the pleasure of acknowledging the reciept of your letter of the 24. inst. I hope you will be able to enjoy the calm of Montpelier until the close of October. It does not appear probable, that the return of our Envoys will render it necessary to change the scene. Their protracted absence, and unconscionable silence, authorise a conjecture, that they have been negotiating with the British...