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I have received with much pleasure your kind letter of the 28th of October. My Son has often mentioned to me the Friendship between you and him, as one that he most highly valued: and he has remembered you with affection in his letters from the banks of New Foundland the 16th of August. I hope with you that his friendship will not terminate but with Life. I know of no more direct and certain...
In my last letter I mentioned the following MEMORIAL To their High Mightinesses, the States General of the United Provinces of the Low Countries. High and Mighty Lords , The subscriber has the honour, to propose to your High Mightinesses, that the United States of America, in Congress assembled, have lately thought fit to send him a Commission (with full powers and instructions) to confer with...
Your letter of the 2 n d is, like all your other letters, a cordial to me. I seem to be conversing with one of the ultimi Americanorum. Your sentiments and mine upon public faith and public credit are perfectly consonant and concordant. As long as old Tenor or new Tenor Land Bank Bills, Continental currency, or Bank Bills of any kind, are made the medium of trade and standard of value, there...
I have received your favour of Oct. 28.—I am very unexpectedly involved in Occupations and Correspondences very dispropotioned to the feeble Forces remaining to a Man of Seventy Four, and which make it impossible for me to reply to the various important subjects of your Letter. There is one however that my Feelings will not allow me to pass by. It is no fault to “Covet honor” any more than it...
I am not under less obligations to you for your Letter of the first of this month, for having neglected So long to acknowledge the Receipt of it. I Shall certainly communicate your Letters to the Historical Society or to the Agricultural Society. Indeed I think they deserve to be recorded by both. At the most proper Time for grafting in the Spring I should be very much obliged to you for a few...
I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
AMSTERDAM, May 8, 1781—wrote to Dr. Franklin: “I have the honor of your letter of the 29th of April, and according to your desire have inclosed a list of the bills accepted with the times of their becoming due; and shall draw for the money to discharge them, only as they become payable and through the house of Fizax & Grand. I sincerely congratulate you upon the noble aid obtained from the...
AMSTERDAM, May 23, 1781—wrote to Dr. Franklin: I have the honor of your letter of the 19th, with its enclosures and thank your excellency, for the pains you have taken to communicate the news from America: which can scarcely be called bad, though Gen. Green lost the field. I had before received and published in the Amsterdam Gazette, the same accounts.—The gazetteers are so earnest after...
I return you the inclosed Letter, according to your desire.—No Eye but mine has seen it: and no Copy of it, or any Part of it has been taken. I See So many difficulties and objections in the Way, that I despair of Success and therefore think it would be imprudent to commit myself. What ever my Son Said to you, he said it by guess.—He knows nothing of my Plan.—You need be under no concern.—If I...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...
AMSTERDAM, May 27, 1781—wrote to Congress: “In the assembly of the States General, the following report has lately been made: Messrs. De Linden, De Hemmen, and other deputies of their High Mightinesses, for maritime affairs, have in consequence of the commissional resolution of the twenty seventh of last month, examined a letter of the directors named in commission by the respective chambers,...
I must, though much against my Inclination agree in your opinion expressed in your kind Letter of the 27th. of Nov. “that it will be a long time before, the Evil of a Paper Medium will be corrected.” your Reasons for this opinion, and your Judgment of the ill Effects of this Swindling System are infallible— The Article “Foreign Relations” in the Patriot was not from me. Nothing from me has...
I have received your kind Letter of 28. of November and another Some time ago that I have not answered. I rejoice with you in all your Prosperity, particularly in the happy Marriage of your Son; and sympathize in all your Sorrows, more especially in the Misfortune of your son Friend Vreede, whom I remember well. Happy are you in your various Learning and the Enjoyment of your Books. I can read...
I have recd your favour of Nov. 20th and regret very much that your Employments would not allow you to Spend a Night with Us. I did not before know but you was one of those respectable People who do not read the Patriot. I must be cautious of Affectation: and not go out of my Way to introduce Things. When I come to mention the sailing of the South Carolina, I Shall mention Some of the...
AMSTERDAM, June 5, 1781, wrote to congress. “The deputies of Middleburg in the assembly of the states of the province of Zealand, on the 14th of May, consented to the petition, for granting larger bounties to those who shall engage in the service of the republic by sea. This advice has been given in this manner. The gentlemen, the deputies of Middleburg, have said, that they were authorized by...
I thank you for the pleasing account of your Family in your favour of the 5th. As I take a lively interest in their Prosperity and Felicity, your relation of it gave me great Pleasure. We have Letters from our Colony navigating the Baltic, dated at Christiansand. They had been so far as prosperous, healthy and happy as such Traveller’s could expect to be. Pope said of my Friend General...
There are two Sentences in Talleyrand’s Letter of the 28th of August, 1798 which ought not to pass unnoticed, the first “In France it was Supposed that the Government of the United States, wished only the appearances of a Negotiation, whence resulted a certain demand for Pledges of good Faith” The Second is “Can it be believed that a Man who should profess a hatred or Contempt of the French...
John Adams with his Consort and their Family desire prayers that the death of a grandchild may be Sanctified to them. They also request your Prayers for their Children and grand Children, in remote Countries abroad and distant parts at home, that thir Lives and health may be preserved from dangers by Sea and land and in due time returned in Safety to their Country and their Friends. ICN .
You very well know, that the Publication of my Letters in Pamplets and Numbers, was a project of your own, without any previous Knowledge or Consent of mine. You had an undoubted write right to do this or to make any this Use of them or any other you pleased; because I had given them to you and to the World. But in your “Introductory Remarks by the Publishers” to the first number you have...
AMSTERDAM, June 12, 1781, wrote to Congress: “The States of Holland and Westfriesland are adjourned to the 27th. In their last session they consented to the augmentation of 17686 land forces, according to the plan which the council of state, in concert with the statholder, had formed on the 18th of April, and which had been carried on the 19th of the same month to the assembly of the states of...
AMSTERDAM, June 15, 1781—wrote to Congress: “The long expected courier has at last arrived at the Hague from Petersburg. The Contents of his dispatches are not public, but all hopes of immediate assistance from the armed neutrality seem to be dissipated. The question now is what is to be done next? Some are for alliances with the House of Bourbon and America; but a thousand fears arise....
I agree with you in your favor of the 1st. that our National concerns are extreamly perplexed. That the National Pride of Britain may feel itself hurt: that it is possible the Ministry may proceed to War with Us for the Sake of Plunder: that the American Commerce would be a Feast for their Naval Friends: that our national Situation appears very unpromising and unpleasant: that I can See no...
The fugitive Trifles I have written in the Course of Fifty or Sixty Years are of little Consequence in point of intrinsic Merit. If they are of any Value and any of them deserve to be preserved, it is on Account of the Dates and Circumstances of the Times in which they were written and if I give you a List of them, it will be more for the sake of disavowing all other Writings than for the any...
I thank you for your favour of Decr 25 And the Extracts inclosed. I regret the loss of your Visit and wish for that to come. The sooner the better. your entertaining account of the Solemnities of the day at Plymouth interested me very much. Every Thing was in the Spirit of the Times. Beaumarchais in his Figarro Says Tout finit d’un Chanson. your Dialogue with a Lady was remarkable. I Should...
AMSTERDAM, June 26, 1781—wrote to congress: “The Rubicon is passed! A step has been at last taken by the regency of Amsterdam, which must decide the fate of the Republic. The city of Amsterdam finding that their proposition of the 18th of last month was not sufficient to change the conduct of Administration, have ventured on another manœuvre. On the 8th of this month, as soon as the states of...
AMSTERDAM, June 29, 1781—wrote to Congress: “On the 21st of this month, the field marshal, the duke Louis of Brunswick, presented to the States General, the following paper High and Mighty Lords, It is not without the greatest reluctance, that I see myself forced to interrupt the important deliberations of your High Mightinesses, and to have recourse to you, in an affair which indeed regards...
I have received your three last Letters. The Correspondence and Conversations which have passed between Us have been under the confidential Seal of Secrecy and Friendship. Any Violation of it will be a breach of Honor and plighted Faith. I Shall never release you from it; if it were in my Power: but it is not. After all the Permission that I could give, your Conscience ought to restrain you. I...
Thanks for “the light and Truth” as I used to call the Aurora, which you sent me. You may descend in a Calm, but I have lived fifty years in a storm, and shall certainly die in one. I never asked my son any questions about the Motives, Designs or Objects of his Mission to Petersbourg. If I had been weak enough to ask, He would have been wise enough to be silent; for although a more dutiful or...
During my absence, which was nearly through the whole month of July, the following state papers were translated by the gentlemen of my family, whom I left in Holland, and transmitted to Congress, or to be kept for me to sign, according to my directions after my return. Amsterdam, 5th July, 1781—“The following is an extract from the registry of the Resolutions of their high Mightinesses the...
Amsterdam, July 13, 1781—transmitted to congress; “The following is an extract from the registry of the resolutions of their high mightinesses the states general of the United Provinces: Thursday, June 28, 1781. Heard the report of Messrs. de Linden, de Hemmen and other deputies of their high mightinesses for maritime affairs, having in consequence, and to obey their commissorial resolution of...
This people must have their own way: They proceed like no other; there cannot be a more striking example of this, than the instructions given to privateers and letters of marque. The commander is ordered to bring his prizes into some port of the united provinces, or into the ports or roads of the allies and friends of this republic, especially France, Sweden, North America or Spain. And the...
Thanks for yours of the first and the two Packetts. Who are they who furnish the Aurora with Such an infinite quantity and Variety of Compositions? There must be many hands, of no small Capacity or Information. In one you Sent me before, there was an Anecdote of a Plan of Washington to attack Philadelphia which was communicated to General How by a Person in his Confidence. The Narrator affirms...
Amsterdam, August 16, 1781, wrote to congress—“Mr. Temple has held offices of such importance, and a bank so considerable in America before the revolution, that his return to his native country at this time cannot fail to cause much speculation, and it is to be feared, some diversity of sentiments concerning him. As he came from London to Amsterdam, and did me the honor of a visit, in which he...
AMSTERDAM, August 25, 1781—wrote to Dr. Franklin: “Last evening I received your excellency’s letter of the 16th of this month, accompanied with a letter from the president of congress containing the commission you mention. (That is, the commission of the 15th of June, printed in my last letter.) You desire to know what steps have already been taken in this business. There has been no step...
I am very much obliged to you for your kind Letter of the tenth of this Month and the very curious Intelligence in it. The Powers of Chicanery that are evoked to drown it, prove that it is thought important. Perhaps it may be, but I have not a Sight Clear enough to perceive it. Where would be the Difference between Mr Jackson and his Successor, if both should be useless. There may be some: if...
Amsterdam, October 17, 1781—wrote to congress: “There is at present a fermentation in this nation which may arise to violent extremities. Hundreds of pamphlets have appeared, some against the Court, some against the city and sovereign magistrates of Amsterdam, all of which must be adjudged to be seditious libels. At length a large pamphlet has appeared in Dutch; and having been distributed...
AMSTERDAM, October 25, 1781—wrote to congress—“I see in the London Courant which arrived to day, an advertisement of a translation into English, of the address to the people of the Netherlands: so that this work is likely to be translated into all languages and read by all the world; notwithstanding the placards against it. I have before sent that of Utrecht: that of Holland is as follows. The...
Amsterdam, December 1, 1781—wrote to Major Jackson: “Last night I received your letter of the 12th of November, and am very sorry to find that you were not likely to sail as you expected. My dear Mrs. Adams, who has heard that Charles is coming home in Gillon, has a thousand anxieties about him, which will increase every moment until his arrival. But when we trust ourselves to wind and waves...
Mr. Bristed, in his Hints, p. 389 to 413, has published some account of an affair which he says John Adams quashed. Whether this is a reproach or an honor, the public will judge from the Documents. On the 25th of August, 1798, I received at Quincy, the following Letter from the Secretary of State. (No. I.) Trenton, August 21, 1798. Sir—I enclose a letter which I received last evening, under...
(No VII.) Mr. President—Permit me to address to you, partriplicata, a copy of my despatch of the 24th of March 1798, which Mr. Caro, my compatriot, has had the honor of transmitting to your excellency from Falmouth, the 10th of May following. The object being of the highest importance, and the accidents of war having possibly prevented the arrival of the two former, it has appeared to me...
What can I say to my Friend in return for his Letter of 26th of April? My Grief for the Melancholy Fate of my Friend John is only equalled by My Sympathy with his amiable Family. In the midst of Grief remember Mercy. Richard remains to you as well as another Son, and several Daughters who do honor to their Parents and their Country. Oh that John had imitated the Example of his Father, and...
I received from our Quincy Stage under the direction of Mr Thayer a Box of Scions from The Endicott Pear Tree, carefully preserved and in admirable order for which I pray you accept my best Thanks. I have engrafted a number of Stocks which have taken very well according to their present appearance, and have distributed others to several Gentlemen in this and the Neighbouring, Towns. Mr Norton...
I acknowledge my fault in neglecting to answer two or three of your last favours. I now thank you for the Letters and the “Light and Truth” as I ought used to call the Aurora. What are We to think of all these Adventurers? Tom Paine, Cobbet Duane Carpenter, Walsh, Bristed? with twenty &cas. Are they all Sent out here, by Administration or opposition, French or English, Scotch or Irish? Our...
Amsterdam, December 14, 1781—wrote to congress: “The first public body, which has proposed a connection with the United States of America, is the quarter of Oostergo, in the province of Friesland. The proposition is in these words. Every impartial patriot has a long time perceived, that in the direction of affairs, relative to this war with England, there has been manifested, an inconceivable...
Amsterdam, December 25, 1781—wrote to congress: “There has appeared an ulterior declaration, in addition to the ordinances of the thirtieth of April and the third of November concerning the navigation and the maritime commerce of the subjects of Prussia, during the present war. The ordinances, which the king has caused to be published of the 30th of April and third of November of this year,...
In the latter end of December, 1781, I concluded to present myself a second time to the President of their high mightinesses, for an answer to my former memorial, and drew up a memorial in English and French; but as I had reason to believe the Duke De La Vauguion and the Comte De Vergennes would not now oppose me, but on the contrary would be pleased by being consulted, I communicated my...
This letter will be presented to you by The Reverend Thaddeus Mason Harris Minister of Dorchester the next Town to this my very good Neighbor and worthy Friend, and what is of much more importance a Gentleman of Ingenuity and Learning, and what is of more consequence yet, of Spotless Morals and exemplary Piety. He has business of an interesting Nature in England, and has occasion for a Voyage...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance The Reverend Thaddeus Mason Harris, the amiable Clergyman of the town of Dorchester, in my neighborhood, who is bound to Europe upon necessary business I know not whether I am not committing an Indiscretion, in presuming upon the small acquaintance with which you honored me in London, to take this Liberty: but I could not resist the Temptation, to...
Mr Sturgis lately presented me with a Speech in Parliament on the Expedition to Copenhagen not more distinguished by its Eloquence, than by its magnanimous assertion of the Obligations of the Laws of Nations; of Equity and Humanity in short of the General rights of Mankind. I was not surprised when I found it was by my Friend Mr Sharp, whose acquaintance and Conversation I recollect with...
My Friend Mr Thaddeus Mason Harris who has for many years been Ordained Minister of Dorchester the next Town to me, and is every Way worthy of the Friendship of all Men of Letters and of Virtue, is bound to England upon interisting Business And as I wish him to be known I have taken the Liberty to give him this line of Introduction to you recollecting as I do with Pleasure many agreeable hours...