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I have received your letter of the 31st of August by Captain Brownson. I saw in an American Paper that Grandpapa has been on board the Seventy four which is in the command of Commadore Bainbrige and thought it a very fine Ship and and am in hopes of having a great many more by my return. I do not like England near so well as America nor do I think I should like any country so well as my native...
Your pretty little letter of October 3rd., mongrel as it is, part English, part French, has diverted me much. I have ran about here, & there, and every where, with delight especially to Auteuil. But my good boy you have many voyages & Journeys to perform, before you can trace all the residences of your vagrant Grand Father. You must go to the Rue de Richlieu to Passy, & to the place de...
I see little in this Play but the Manners of the Atheanians and The Naivete et Nettite du Style. The Miseries of Domestick Life; when all Confidence is wanting: between Parents and Children Masters and Servants, Friends and Neighbours, Husbands and Wives, Lovers and Mistresses; are held Up to View in a Mirror. Such Morals are surely no better than those of London or Boston, Paris or New York....
you are a frolicksome little fellow; and I delight in your Fun with your School mates as heartily as you do, because it proves that you are all good natured and good humoured and live together in harmony. When I lived in Holland, the Dablers in English laughed a little, sub rosâ at a question put by William the fifth Prince of Orange to a Stranger who Spoke the Language “What for a Countryman...
Do you See, in these Plays of Terence, which are the Translations from Menander, the Character of the Athenians? Are not the Slaves Superior Beings to the Citizens? Every Smart Expression; every brilliant Image, every Moral Sentiment is in the Mouth of a Slave. To be Sure, however, Masters and Slaves are nearly on a Level, in Principles of Conduct. MHi : Adams Papers. {{Included with...
I thank you for your kind Letter of July 26. Your Visit to Mr Clarksons must have been very pleasant. Such a number of young Ladies who all spoke in your mother tongue must have had to you, all the charms of Novelty as well as beauty. I have never read Mr Clarkson’s History of Quakers Anabaptists or Methodists You are too young to form a permanent Judgment whether you like London, Petersburg...
This is Commencement Day, at Harvard Colledge or in more magnificent Language at The University at Cambridge . But whether you call it Colledge or University, I hope you will one day Study there and take your Degrees there. I have recd your Letter of June 23d. Charles! have you left your Genius frozen in Russia? You was celebrated in Petersburg, and from thence in America, as a Smart Boy. This...
Mr John C Gray is to take this letter, & with it my fervent wishes for your happiness, & for that and the success of your education. We are anxious to know whether your parents have placed you in any public or private school, who are your instructors who your fellow Students, and what branches of Literature & Science you are taught. You have had great opportunities to see the masterpeices of...
I have received Letters from you all, and you know not how gratifying they have been to my heart. With pleasure I See the great Advantage you have already derived from the Advice of your Father. I have recd. four Letters from George N. 1. 2. 4 and 5. Number Three only is missing. George writes like the elder Brother he is. John writes with that Vivacity and Spirit which always delighted Us;...
I give you credit for finding time to write me in London where there are So many Objects to engage your Attention So! you have Seen, the Lion in the Tower! And how many more, of your and my Fellow Creatures? Pray did you See, as I did, the Phyal of holy Oil, with which Kings are anointed? That little bottle and its Contents were to me the most curious Objects that I saw upon Tour Hill; made...
I have heard much of your progress in French German & Russian but little of your Proficiency in Greek and Latin. I have no great partiality for the pursuit of a great Variety of Languages. I never knew or read of a Man celebrated for reading, writing and speaking Eleven Languages who was good for any thing else. Greek and latin are indispensible for a Scholar; and with these he may easily...
I have now gone through Terence, and noted a few Lines for you to consider. Many perhaps have escaped my Notice that deserved it MHi : Adams Papers.
Your beautiful letter of Sept 11th has given me great pleasure. You are at a very respectable Academy, and have all the means, & advantages for instruction that I could wish for you. You must have made a rapid progress, in your Nomenclature, if in so short a time, you can distinguish the faces, and call the names of 140 out of 275 of your fellow Students I wish I could have the benefit and...
Hence forward I Shall adress you all three at once. Yesterday was one of the happiest days of my Life. It brought me News of your Father and Mother at Paris and your Uncle Aunt and Cousin at New York all in good health. My Boys! I want to Say Something to you on the Subject of Languages. I have no great Opinion of those who boast of possessing a great number of them. If you know Greek and...
The Accounts I receive of your Indisposition, excite much Grief. Your Father by Precept and Example will recommend Exercise, and he will be right: but ask him, if he has not been Sometimes intemperate, even in the Use of this Salutary Remedy. Moderation in all Things is indispensable. Riding is excellent; Walking more so; a Mixture of both is better than either. Renouce your Flute. If you must...
Mr John Chipman Gray, who is to be the Bearer of this Letter is about to make the Tour of Europe, begining with England. If you and your Brothers Should See him I hope you will Shew him not only all the respect that is due from you to all your Countrymen, but the particular Civility which he merits as the Son of your Fathers and Grandfathers Friend. My Solicitude, for you all, has increased...
I am afraid you will be offended at my freedom; but you are, in your hand writing, at Such an immense distance behind your two Brothers that I cannot abstain from urging you to force your Attention to that elegant usefull and indispensible Accomplishment. In order to diminish that ardor and abate that hurry which will inevitably force you into a Slovenly habit; accustom yourself to a critical...
I recd, last night your pleasing Letter of the 9th of Aug. which is the latest date We have had from your Family. I have read Goldsmith too, this fall, and agree with you that his style is good but he was too intimate with Johnson to be impartial. Read Human and Smollet and all such Compends as you read Epick Poems and Romances. But you must consult original Writers to find the Truth. Smith...
I have recd. your Number 2. June 30th. Number 3 and your June 8th. without number. I am Sorry you did not number this. See with what punctuality your Father numbers all his Letters, and consider the great Advantage of this practice, both to yourself and your Correspondent. Your June 8th is the production of an attentive mind, awake to the novel Sceens and great Objects around you. The Monument...
I sent you by Mr Colman a few latin lines, with a bald translation. Cannot you render that translation into French? Try. I send you now a few sentences on the same subject of Caloric by which you may judge how far the Ancients were behind the Moderns, in this point of natural Knowledge. Cicero, in his Essay De Natura Deorum; an admirable Work for its Age, which I hope you will, one day Study...
Every one of your letters has given me great pleasure, and none more than No. 6. Aug. 15 just received. I am much pleased with the progress of your studies especially in the language of the Muses. When you are Master of the Greek all other Tongues Arts and Sciences you may want, will be easily in your power. You ought also to bestow Some of your attention upon Numbers and Figures as well as...
Had I been told, my dear George, on the 28th. of December, that I Should take no notice of your letter for eleven or twelve days, I Should have been affronted. But so it is. The plain proof you have given me, of your improvement in Writing, Since you have been in Hingham is a great pleasure. I am a little out of humour with your Brother, because, tho’ I See by his Letter to his Grandmother...
I have received your pleasing letter of Sept. 12. Your Situation is indeed delightful: But I hope you think more of the Musick of the Swan of Thames, than of the house of Dr Todd or the Miss Porters. Twickenham and Chiswick deserve your respect. Richmond Hill is familiar to me. There I visited Governor Pounall and Mr Richard Penn. M.P. I rambled about the place and Saw its beauties. But I...
I received yr last, with great pleasure and with Still more your Sensible Letter of the 17th of July, No. 4. I had before received No. 1. and No. 5.—Numbers 2. and three are behind Still lingering on their passage I congratulate you on the fresh Lawrells acquired by our Naval Heroes in the Mediterranean. They have now carried the Arms of their Country in tryumph beyond the Pillars of Hercules....
I adress myself to both of you as equally dear to me and because the difficulty with which I write, will not allow me to write seperately to each. Our anxiety for you and for your Father Mother, Brother, Uncle Aunt and little first and Second Cousin: have been greater than you can conceive. Some relief however We have received from Vessels you met at Sea, one of which brought a Letter from Mr...
I Send you, a few Lines from the Old Astronomical and Astrological Poet, Manilius, whom you may Some time or other, think it worth your while to read, from curiosity at least. Sunt autem cunctis permixti partibus ignes; Qui gravidas habitant fabricantes fulmina nubes; Et penetrant torras, Ætnamque minantur Olympo; Et callidas reddunt ipsis in fontibus undas; Ac Silice in dura, viridique in...
You cannot easily imagine, how much Grief, the news of your Indisposition has given Us. our most chearing hopes are built upon your Foundation. Give your closest Attention to your health, for on that every Thing depends. You must Study Physick; not to practice but to be your own Physician. Pray your Father to buy Dr Cheynes Works, on my Account. Neglected, despised and forgotten as he is, I...
I desire to know, which of the Characters in the Andrian you was appointed to represent at the Exhibition: and whether your performance was to your own Satisfaction of that of any body else? The Six Plays of Terrence are Valuable 1. For the Purity Simplicity, Perspicuity, Precision and Concision of the Style, that is the Latinity. 2. For the Information they contain, of the Laws, Customs and...
I know not where your Father is, or I should write directly to him. As Soon as you See him, pray to procure for himself and for you “Il Consulato del Mare” with all the Tanslations of it, into Dutch, German, Italian, French, English Spanish, and as many as there be. I have it only with a translation into Low Dutch. About 8 or 9 hundred Years ago, (I have neither time nor patience to look up...
I know not where your Father is, or I Should write directly to him. As Soon as you See him, pray him to procure for himself and for you “Il Consulato del Mare” with all the Tanslations of it, into Dutch, German, Italien, French, English Spanish, and as many as there be. I have it only with a translation into Low Dutch. About 8 or 9 hundred Years ago, (I have neither time nor patience to look...
I received your Letter of May 29th. Some days past; and yesterday Mr and Mrs. Tarbell called upon Us to our great Surprise, We never having had the least intimation or Suspicion of their Arrival. Their Account of our Three Boys is the most particular and the most pleasing We have ever heard. They are really delighted with the behaviour of you all. And I am not less gratified with your Letter....
I find upon my table this morning your favour of the 7. March; and I know not whether I have ever answered it. I approve of your “eating and Sleeping and living together; of your playing Football, Crickett; running, climbinge, leaping Swimming, Skateing; and have no great Objection to your play at Marbles. These are good for your Health: but what do you do for your Mind? The Mind is of more...
I am much pleased with your Translation. The Character of Anacreon is one of the many Mysteries of Antiquity which the Researches of your whole Life will not be able to unridle. He did well to renounce the Heroes, for he either know nothing of the Sons of Atreus, of Cadmus the Theban King, or of Hercules and his twelve Labours; or if he knew any Thing, he dared not till what he know. It is...
I have received two pretty Letters from you, and know not how to account for my own delay in answering either of them till this Time. That of the 21st of January is now before me, and is dated. Give my Love to your Brother, and tell him, he forgot to give any date to his. For your Comfort and Georges too, I can tell you, that you write as well as your Father did at your Age. But what a Writer...
“Learn Patience of a Friend”! You think you must go to sea. Well, I have no great Objection; provided you can command yourself; and your Constitution is Strong enough to support itself in all Climates, and through all Risques But let me tell you, that to qualify yourself to be a Seaman such as Halley Rawley, Cook, Columbus &c. you must go through a course of Patient Study. You must make...
It gives me much pleasure, to hear that you have a Taste for Numbers, because this quality or faculty, call it which you will, is commonly connected with a curiosity for Quantities, and leads to Algebraical and geometrical Studies You think you have and an Inclination for the Sea: but, my dear Child, you know not, as yet, your own Propensities. You must learn to think before you decide; to...
Ego recepi tua epistolam a te scriptam Vigesimo tribus mensis Julii. ubi nuntius te a bombardâ matutinâ expavi actum fuisse dicis quoque tibi propinationês plamusque nullo modo placeve et frateribus mihi qua valda placent. Discipulus sum in Schola Doctoris Nicholas, ad Ealing, ubi docenti Septuaginta quisque condiscipulos habeo—Magister noster Universitatis Oxonii alumnus est, et mihi maxima...
I know not whether you have read Tristram Shandy, or The Sentimental Journey or the Sermons or Epistles of Stearne. I was never an enthusiastic Admirer of him, though he was amusing enough Sometimes; moral now and then; pathetic once in a while but tedious often and always Odd. I See announced, a Publication of Dr John Ferriar, of Manchester under the Title of “Illustrations of Sterne, with...
I culled a Few Flowers for George from The Andrian. I have done the Same for you here from the Step Mother, and will do the Like Soon for Charles. I Sent Georges by Mr Thatcher. A. John! Your Father and your Grandfather can attest upon Oath to a Similar Voyage in 1778. John! The Case of the Step Mother here is the Case of your Grandfather! Meditate a little upon it. MHi : Adams Papers.
Your capacity is as Smart and quick and ready, and retentive as any bodies. I Should not therefore be Surprised if you Should soon take a turn in your thoughts and pursuits, and outstrip both your Brothers, George and Charles in Latin and Greek, as well as in Arithmetick and Geometry. But I want to know what School You attend; where you board; who are the Masters, Proceptors Ushers Schollars;...
I know not whether I can ever consent to your being a Sailor Boy. I have already prescribed to you Geometry, Astronomy Algebra Geography &c as one would think enough to discourage but I have still more to Suggest to you. Are you willing to go to calledge take a Degree and After that be admitted to the respectable Rank of a Midshipman? As the Czar Peter did. Are you willing to Study Homer and...
You cannot imagine, how much pleasure, your Letter of July 24th gave me. Your Father and Mother have improved Your hand in a few days, more than We were able to do, in as many Months. I enter So feelingly into the Spirit of your Amusements that I wish you had mentioned the names of the principal Dancers male and female at the Opera. I have been present at all those Scenes of life that you...
Your classical letter of the 4th. of Octr, does you honour, upon every Supposition that I can make. If you have composed it yourself, it is highly honourable to the Skill and care of your Preceptors and to your own Application to your Studies; All of which must have concurred in producing Such a proficiency in so Short a time. If, by your dutiful and submissive behaviour to your Masters you...
I am charmed with the Chirography of your Letter of the Eleventh of September to your Grandmother. If your proficiency in your other Studies is in proportion to your improvement in your hand writing you will soon be a first rate Scholar. Your Account of the Accademy at Ealing is quite Satisfactory. If under Such Masters pursuing Such Studies and Exercises, with Such Companions, you do not lay...
I have a rich Budget to send you by the next Ship. I have no time to prepare it by the Milo. I would send you some Newspapers but am told a Collection for the Months past is prepared for you Mr E. Copland Junr will present this. He is first Clerk to Degrand. You have all the Treaties and Projects of Treaties I presume but Britain and U. S. I presume from 1782 to 1815 Jays, Monroes Erskines and...
This Letter is devoted to one Subject. Since the Death of Judge Cushing there has been frequently expressed in Conversation, much regret at your Absence, among People of all Parties. Presuming that Absence to be an insuperable Bar to any Nomination as a Judge, I have taken very little Notice of such Insinuations of Regret and imputed some of them to one Motive and Some to another. I need not...
I thank you for the Memoirs of Doctor Price. Though there is little in this Work which was new to me, except the Calvinism of the Doctors Father and Uncle. Yet I love to run over again the Passages of a Life which I esteemed and loved as one of the wisest and most benevolent of the human Race. I Shall not review this Pamphlet, and have nothing to Say in praise or censure of it, except that...
though I owe you many Apologies for neglecting to write for so long a time, it would give you no pleasure to read them. The Misfortunes afflictions and griefs in our Family in 1811 were sufficiently pungent, and to repeat them would be to renew them. I feel too much for you, your Consort and your Sister, as well as for Mr Smith to wish to renew the Sorrows which you must have felt at the first...
I have requested a number of Friends, to Search and Seek for information concerning the Fisheries, and they have procured me many Letters which I have Sent you. I ought to have recorded in a Book every One of those Testimonies: but you know the impossibility of it, as I have no Clerk. Some of those documents I have been obliged to Send away to you, without reading them. Inclosed is one from...
A Gentleman, whose Name is Reynolds a Native of Boston, a Graduate at Cambridge, a Pupil in Medicine and Surgery of the late Dr Warren, a Son of a respectable Merchant, a good Scholar and an amiable Character, requests as all other young Travellers do, Letters to You. He goes, I Suppose to See the Hospitals in England Scotland France &c. I have nothing in particular to Say, but that Yesterday...