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To James Madison from William C. C. Claiborne, 13 February 1806 (Abstract)

From William C. C. Claiborne, 13 February 1806 (Abstract)

§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 13 February 1806, New Orleans. “Since my communication of the 6th instant, a Duplicate of which goes by this mail, several Letters of which the enclosures from No. 1. to No. 6 are Copies,1 have passed between the Marquis of Casa Calvo and myself, on the Subject of the departure of the Spanish officers from this territory.

“It is understood that the Marquis proposes to proceed by way of the Lakes to east Florida.”

RC and enclosures (DNA: RG 59, TP, Orleans, vol. 8). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Claiborne; docketed by Wagner. For enclosures, see n. 1.

1The enclosures (11 pp.; in Spanish and English; docketed by Wagner) are copies of (1) Casa Calvo to Claiborne, 7 Feb. 1806, acknowledging Claiborne’s 6 Feb. letter informing him of the president’s order that all officers and employees of the king should leave Orleans Territory as soon as possible; (2) Claiborne’s 8 Feb. 1806 reply (printed in Rowland, Claiborne Letter Books description begins Dunbar Rowland, ed., Official Letter Books of W. C. C. Claiborne, 1801–1816 (6 vols.; Jackson, Miss., 1917). description ends , 3:261–62), stating that he could neither doubt nor discuss the propriety of Jefferson’s orders, which it was his duty to execute; that Casa Calvo and all other Spanish officials should leave the territory as soon as possible; that the departure should not be delayed by more than a few days; and offering any of his services to facilitate their departure; (3) Casa Calvo’s 10 Feb. 1806 reply stating that Claiborne’s 8 Feb. letter had left him certain of Claiborne’s firm determination that Casa Calvo and others in the king’s service should leave the territory; protesting against this act of violence and insult to the king which gave no reason why the communication of two friendly powers should be so interrupted and forced him to abandon the king’s interest; and agreeing to leave although perhaps not as soon as Claiborne and he himself wished because he was leaving by sea, the necessary preparations for which would take time; (4) Claiborne’s 11 Feb. 1806 response (printed in Rowland, Claiborne Letter Books description begins Dunbar Rowland, ed., Official Letter Books of W. C. C. Claiborne, 1801–1816 (6 vols.; Jackson, Miss., 1917). description ends , 3:263–64) stating that Jefferson’s orders were not issued out of violence and insult to Charles IV, as Casa Calvo seemed to think; that Jefferson’s permission for Spanish officials to remain so long past the time prescribed by the treaty proved his respect for the king and indulgence towards his officers, which Claiborne was sorry to see was not appreciated; and requiring Casa Calvo to leave on or before 15 Feb., the others to follow him soon after; (5) Casa Calvo to Claiborne, 12 Feb. 1806, stating that the royal employees who remained in the territory were those who were appointed to the boundary commission, those who had either retired or voluntarily left the king’s service, the minister of marine, who was overseeing a contract which the king had made with a private citizen, and perhaps some others who were engaged in matters of business to be soon concluded; and requesting a passport so that he might travel with his son and his family to whichever of the Spanish territories would suit him best; and (6) Claiborne to Casa Calvo, 12 Feb. 1806 (printed in Rowland, Claiborne Letter Books description begins Dunbar Rowland, ed., Official Letter Books of W. C. C. Claiborne, 1801–1816 (6 vols.; Jackson, Miss., 1917). description ends , 3:265), enclosing passports for Casa Calvo and his family, and wishing him well.

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