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I have safely recieved your favor from Amelia with the [sheets?] of the Columbiad which it covered, and have given to them the hasty perusal which my less agreeable but more indispensable occupations have permitted. rarely indeed do they permit one moment’s deflection from the volumes of official papers which every day presents. the few moments I could spare to this object, I will say, were...
Your favor of May 26. is recieved and I am perfectly disposed to communicate to you the collections I possess as far as their condition will admit. what this is will need explanation. I have a collection, nearly compleat, of the laws from 1624. to 1662. where Pervis’s printed collection begins. but some of the volumes are in such a state of decay, that the leaf falls to pieces on being turned...
Your favor of the 2d. inst. reached me at this place yesterday only, and I now return you my thanks for the Peruvian curiosities which your kindness has destined for me. mr Budd had not, I presume, reached Washington on the 7th. when I left it, or they would have been recieved, and an earlier acknolegement made. the description of them is interesting and they will be a very acceptable addition...
I am honoured with your two letters of the 10th. insts with their respective enclosures—which shall be carefully forwarded as addressed—enclosed I send you a few Letters passing between me and Colo. Troup on the subject of Cheethams publication against me, and which Mr. Troup, is said to have been originally acquainted with, did correct it or was the author of it, certainly has declared the...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the Vicepresident and is sorry that an error of his Secretary mentioning Thursday the 17th. instead of Tuesday the 17th. in his note of invitation should have occasioned a miscomprehension of the day. mr Harvie wrote a note correcting his error, to the V. President; but lest it should not have been delivered Th:J. asks leave to expect the pleasure of his...
The voyage referred to by Mr. Vanderkemp was undertaken and conducted by individuals, in whose hands the journal and other papers, which he desires to peruse, must remain. Mr. Barrill of Boston had a concern in the voyage and may be therefore resorted to in order to trace their place of Deposit. With very high respect, I have the honor to remain, Dr Sir your most obed. servt. RC (owned by...
Your first letter, in a style too peremptory, made a demand, in my opinion, unprecedented and unwarrantable. My answer, pointing out the embarrassment, gave you an opportunity to take a less exceptionable course. You have not chosen to do it, but by your last letter, received this day, containing expressions indecorous and improper, you have increased the difficulties to explanation,...
11 December 1803, Department of State. “J. Madison presents his respects to the vice-president, who will find in the enclosed the information afforded by the office of state on the subject of former amendments to the Constitution. Mr. Beckley recollects, that in one of the instances, copies equal to the number of the states were made out in the clerk’s office of the House of Representatives....
Your Protegé Buisson has addressed to me the inclosed letter. Why he did not immediately write to you I cannot tell unless it be that he is conscious he has used your politeness sufficiently, and imagines an intermediary to be hereafter necessary. Perhaps you may be able to decipher his wishes from the letter; which I confess is beyond my skill. But I understand from him in conversation that...
The inclosed was by mistake at the post office put into my packet of letters recieved last night from the post office, and was broke open without particular examination of the superscription. in the moment of opening it, seeing your name on a paper inclosed in it, I looked to the superscription and instantly closed the letter without having read one single word in it. the truth of this...
I distinctly recollect (as was once before verbally explained between us) that just before you made a payment of Two thousand Dollars on your Bond, Winships Mortgage was returned to you, as the mean by which the money was to be procured. I think it was sent to you by Le Guen himself. It is to be presumed, that Winship has had since some intimation from the possessor of his mortgage, and that...
In my letter of yesterday I forgot to put the inclosed and to ask the favor of you to address it to the proper place. it is in answer to one I received three months ago , dated in Dumfries, but the gentleman was there only as a traveller and did not advise me where to address the answer. I inclosed it to mr Gallatin having heard him speak of the writer. but he returned it to me two months ago,...
Th: Jefferson with his salutations to the Vice President returns him the letter he put into his hands for perusal. the Secretary at war had a high opinion of mr Barron: but on the informations he has recieved, that opinion is suspended. the matter being sub judice no more ought to be said, than that no prejudices will be in the way of justice. RC ( CtY ); addressed: “The Vice President of the...
I have maturely reflected on the subject of your letter of the 18th instant; and the more I have reflected the more I have become convinced, that I could not, without manifest impropriety, make the avowal or disavowal which you seem to think necessary. The clause pointed out by Mr. Van Ness is in these terms “I could detail to you a still more despicable opinion , which General Hamilton has...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful salutations to the Vice-president of the US. and his thanks for the friendly sentiments of his letter of this morning. the request for transmitting to the V. President elect the notification of his election, is put into a train for execution. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Mr. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the Vice President. There was about two years ago a Consul at St. Jago, since which nothing has been heard from him; such characters not being tolerated by the Spanish Govrs. in times of peace. He was also involved in such a manner with the local authorities as to render it questionable how far he could be prudently used for the purpose...
Your favor of the 10th . has been recieved, as have been those also of Sep. 4. & 23. in due time. these letters all relating to office, fall within the general rule which even the very first week of my being engaged in the administration obliged me to establish, to wit, that of not answering letters on office specifically, but leaving the answer to be found in what is done or not done on them....
I have for some time been pestered with letters & packages from two women of the name of Bampfield whom I never saw or heard of & must suppose to be mad. I have just recieved the inclosed packet. from the daughter, which, understanding from it that the mother is in Baltimore, I wish to return to her, without looking into it’s contents, in order to put an end to the correspondence. perhaps the...
I recieved in due time your favor of Mar. 2. and the saddle also is come safely to hand. I am well pleased with it, and take it willingly, but on the express condition that you permit me to pay for it. I have ever laid it down as an unalterable law to myself to accept of no present while I am in a public office. I assume that your own reflections on the tendency of the contrary practice will...
Mr. Harvie, my present secretary, proposing now to commence the practice of the law, and Capt. Lewis’s enterprise being likely to prevent his resuming his station for two or three years to come, it has become necessary for me to fill up the vacancy. not knowing whether it might not be acceptable to you to take such a stand for a time in preference to your retirement in the country, I take the...
Mr. Harvie, my late Secretary having concluded to enter shortly on the practice of the law, and found it necessary to fix himself in the Study of a practising lawyer to learn the rules of pleading, I took the liberty, in the latter end of March, of addressing a letter to you , on the supposition that you might by possibility be willing to take his place & exchange your country residence for...
Your favor of Dec. 26. was duly recieved, as also the correspondence therein referred to. mr Coles delivered me to-day your request of a copy of the Parl. Manual for yourself & another for the Speaker. I therefore send one to each of you in separate packages by this post. you will have seen an account in all the papers, (with so many details, as to make one forget for a moment that they never...
In compliance with your request, I have endeavoured to charge my recollection more minutely, concerning the particulars of my intercourse with Mr. Jefferson (at present the President of the United States) at several times while the British Army were in Virginia, in and about the year 1781. At the time General Arnold arrived within the Capes, I was preparing for a journey from Richmond, on...
I Received your Letter by the last Mail: Mr Beckley is mistaken in stateing that Genl Stevens had offered to give me some information respecting the conduct of the President of the U.S. at the time the State of Virginia was invaded by the English—I told Mr B that Genl S. could give such information and from his known Character I doubted not but that he would, if applied to; that I had a...
Your favor of the 15th. was recieved last night, & I learn with sincere concern the illness you have experienced, & that, tho’ mending, you may possibly not be able to join me before your services will be called for in Richmond. I should still more however regret this accident were it to become a motive for your not resuming your station at all. I shall be happy to see you at Washington as...
The interest which you were so kind as to take in mr Randolph’s sickness will I am sure render it acceptable to you to learn that his fever left him finally in the morning of the day on which you left us, and that he convalesced regularly from that period though slowly on account of the quantity of blood taken from him. we did not leave Washington till the 7th. inst. he might have ventured a...
I have but a moment to inclose you the draught promised in the rough. remember you promised to copy it your self and not to let it be seen by any one in the original, nor is the least idea to be permitted to escape as to the quarter from which it comes. on this subject I rely on you with entire confidence. Accept my affectionate salutations and assurances of esteem & attachment. MHi : Coolidge...
I enclose a copy, ‘second edition published at Worcester’, of the pamphlet I wrote at philadelphia, during our Political struggles in 1800. To you, it may be necessary to apologize for several inaccuracies as to dates in the Epitome of Mr. Jefferson’s life contained in the latter pages. written on the spur of the occasion, without communicating with any person, possessing scanty materials and...
Yours of Aug. 7. from Liberty never got to my hands till the 9th. inst. about the same time I recieved the Enquirer in which Decius was so judiciously answered. the writer of that paper observed that the matter of Decius consisted 1st. of facts. 2dly. of inferences from these facts: that he was not well enough informed to affirm or deny his facts, & he therefore examines his inferences, and in...
Your friendly intimations to me as to matters respecting myself, never need an apology. I know them always to proceed from the kindest motives, & am thankful for them. I have had too many proofs of the interest you take in what concerns me to have a doubt of this. but the story from Richmond is one of those unfounded falsehoods which assail me regularly in whatever direction I move. mr...
In the Spring of 1781 I was first Lt on board of the Brig Jefferson lying in James River, when the British under Arnold came to Petersburgh from thence to Manchester, in ascending the River above Osborne’s. They attack’d, capturd & burnt, the aforesaid Brig, then under my command; (in the absence of Captn Travers of Wmsburg) I went immediately to Richd, where they were every moment expecting...
Your letter of the 18th. has been duly recieved and mr Coles consents to remain here till the 4th. of March, when I shall leave this place for Monticello and pass a month there. consequently if you can join me here the second week in April it will be as early as your absence could affect my convenience.   I have long since given up the expectation of any early provision for the extinguishment...
§ To Norman Butler. 20 September 1805 . “I have received your letter of the 9th. stating that you have revoked a power of Attorney formerly given to Messrs. Capper & Perkins of Bermingham to receive the compensation awarded to you by the Commors. under the 7 Art: of the British Treaty, and requesting that the third instalment of the award may be paid only to your future order. “It appearing...
Your favors of the 19th & 21st. are duly recieved. mr Pintard’s application is with the Secretary of state. there is considerable competition for the consulship of Madeira , & mr Pintard’s application is not for himself but for his nephew, perhaps in Commendam. your recommendation of Capt. Conelly will be duly attended to. we do not however expect to send another squadron to the Mediterranean...
Your favor of the 14th . came to hand on the 20th. I thank you for the information it contained. it is of that kind which I am anxious to recieve. after so long and complete an exclusion from office as republicans have suffered insomuch that every place is filled with their opponents justice as well as principle requires that they should have some participation. I believe they will be...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments & his thanks to Mr. Buxton for the drawings he has been so kind as to send him of a still for the distillation of sea–water. it has been for some time under his contemplation to have that process familiarised to our ships of war, which lose important time in going for water. with mr Buxton’s permission, his designs will be considered with a view to that...
Inclosed is a letter to Governor St. Clair, from a copy which [is] also inclosed, you will find that his commission of Governor of the North Western Territory is to cease on his receipt of the notification. It is only to be added that no successor has yet been appointed and consequently that the functions of the Office devolve on you as Secretary of the said Territory. I have the Honor to be...
I have safely recieved the volume of Dr. Priestley’s works which mr Priestley has been so kind as to destine for me. the matter is worthy of it’s author, and the mechanical execution does honor to the American artists. I observe in your catalogue the following books. pa. 18. Brown’s view of the civil law & law of Admiralty. 2. v. 8vo. 62. Chatham’s Anecdotes. 2. v. 8vo. 67. Enfield’s history...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Byrne & his thanks for the inclosed catalogue of pamphlets, which he now returns not finding any thing in it which he has occasion to call for. in truth political pamphlets are of so ephemeral an interest that their value passes almost with the moment which produces them. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Th: Jefferson with his thanks to mr Byrne for his attention to the little order for the books, has the pleasure to inform him they arrived safely, and to inclose him a draught on the bank of the US. for 20¾ D. their amount. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
I lately recieved your friendly letter of 28. Vendem. an. 11. with the two volumes on the relations between the Physical & moral faculties of man. this has ever been a subject of great interest to the inquisitive mind, and it could not have got into better hands for discussion than yours. that thought may be a faculty of our material organisation, has been believed in the gross: and tho’ the...
Th: Jefferson presents his friendly salutations to mr Cabell, & his thanks for the communication of Workman’s pamphlet which he now returns, being in possession of one which the author had sent him some two years ago. of the Author he knew nothing personally; but being known to be one of the Mexican league, his availing himself of his office as judge to liberate his accomplices is not in his...
I have have been instrumental Randolph my son in law, with you, . I assure you on my honour it is without foundation. the first idea I ever had of his offering himself was on my arrival at his house the 11th. of March, when he had already been acting some days in it, & when probably it was known to yourself, and the only conversation I ever had with him on the subject was one in which I...
Agreeably to an Act of Congress, entitled An Act for the more general promulgation of the Laws of the United States, passed 3d. March 1795, and the Acts in addition thereto, passed on the 2d. March 1799 and on the 27 March 1804, I have transmitted to the Collector of the Customs at Baltimore 1254 copies of the Laws of the United States 1st. Session 9th. Congress, being the proportion for the...
Agreeably to an Act of Congress entitled "An Act for the more general promulgation of the laws of the United States " passed 3d. March 1795 and the acts in addition thereto passed 2d. March 1799 and on the 27th. March 1804, I have transmitted to the Collector of the Customs at Alexandria 1254 Copies of the laws of the UStates 2d. Session 9th. Congress being the proportion for the State of...
The National legislature, by an Act, at their last session, for laying out & making a road from Cumberland, in Maryland to the State of Ohio, Authorised the President to appoint Commissioners for laying it out in such direction as they should judge proper, & he should approve: & the President, after obtaining the consent of the States through which it should be laid out, was authorised to take...
I have the honor to inclose by direction of the President, a Proclamation issued by him, of this date, and to remain with great consideration and respect, Your Most Obt: Servt: Vi .
I recieved last night your favor of the 10th. there can certainly be no present objection to the forwarding the letters therein mentioned, according to their address. We have nothing new of importance, except that at the last reading of an Amendatory bill a few days ago, the H. of R. were surprised into the insertion of an insidious clause permitting any merchant having property abroad, on...
Between 3 & 4. years ago I recieved the inclosed petitions praying for the pardon or the enlargement of Thomas Logwood, then & still confined in the Penitentiary of Richmond for counterfieting the bank notes of the US. I consulted Govr. Page on the subject who, after conferring with his council, informed me that tho’ he was for a pardon himself he found a division of opinion on the question, &...
In my letter of the 7th. I informed you that on consultation at Washington it had been concluded best to commit the whole business of flags to Capt Decatur. I now find that I had not recollected our conclusion correctly, and that it had been understood that the commanding officers, by land & water should have equal authority to license the sending & recieving flags: which is not only proper,...