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Your favor of Apr. 28. came safe to hand with the watch chain and seal, which are entirely to my mind, and I now inclose you an order of the bank of the US. of this place on that at Philadelphia for 20. D. the amount of the two articles. I am now in all the hurry & bustle of preparation for departure this evening if I can be ready, or tomorrow morning at farthest, and having not a word of news...
I am just winding up for my departure and therefore have only time to inform you that I have left with mr Barnes the means and the instructions to make you the usual remittances in the forepart of the months of August & September, during which I shall be absent, and that we shall not be altogether without the hope of seeing you at Monticello. Accept my affectionate salutations and assurances...
I recieved last night yours of the 10th. the idea of your going so early as by the vessel which sails on Sunday has been given up. consequently it will not be till the next which will go in 6. weeks, unless an earlier passage were to occur by some other vessel, which as it might excite less notice would be more desirable. we have ceased to annex Secretaries of legation to our foreign missions,...
I now inclose you a draught of the bank of the US. of this place on that of Philadelphia for five hundred dollars. I am extremely uneasy at the unfortunate fate of my envois of seeds to Madame de Tessé. I fear she will think me a very inattentive friend. fall was twelvemonth, I prepared, as you know, a box of seeds, well assorted, well packed, sound & fresh, and sent it by a ship from...
In my note of Oct. 13. I inclosed you a draught of the United States bank here on that at Philadelphia for 1000. Dollars. I have been a little anxious to know that it got safely to hand; altho the safety of that kind of remittance is such as to leave one in little concern but for considerable sums.   instead of remitting a similar sum at this time, I am obliged to avail myself of the...
Th: Jefferson with his friendly salutations to mr Short sends him by his servant the bundle of papers relative to his affairs which Th:J. had kept with him at the seat of government, because they have been written or recieved there. this with the bundle communicated to him at Monticello contains every thing relative to mr Short’s affairs which are in the hands of Th:J. in this bundle...
As you talked of coming on here in the month of February I have been expecting you, without writing. I am in hopes however the inclosed letter from mr Lilly will reach you at New York. there is not in the world a lighter or more unprincipled talker than Henderson: and as to any offer from him he is entirely bankrupt. still I have no doubt that eight dollars could be got for your whole tract,...
According to the desire in your letter of July 19. & that to mr Price, I have settled the rents of Indian Camp to the end of 1783. either from a defect of my instructions to mr Lilly or his understanding them, he had proceeded in the collection of the rents for that year and made considerable progress before I knew & stopped him. I some time last autumn sent you a supplement to our accounts...
Your’s of April 3. came to hand June 13. my last to you was of Apr. 19. when I wrote so fully in answer to your several favors, that I should not have had occasion to write now but by way of supplement as to the particular article of the purchase of stock for you, not then finished. as soon as the peace had produced the whole of it’s effect on our stock by depressing it, and it was percieved...
The Secretary of state presents his compliments to Mr. Short, and informs him, in answer to his note of the 19th. Inst. that the vouchers to which he alludes are already at the Auditors Office, and that this Department will cheerfully do all that is in its power, towards the putting of Mr. Shorts accounts into a train of settlement. Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, DL , vol. 14). Letter not...
I am now able to resume my paiments, which have been interrupted by the great expences of the season: and which indeed experience has proved to be unavoidable at times, by an accumulation of calls beyond ordinary expectation. I inclose you a draught of the bk US. here on that at Philadelphia for 500. D. we had been in hopes that the ceremony of the impeachment now going on at this place would...
Your favor of Feb. 26. has been duly recieved. I think I mentioned in a former letter that experience had shewn me that I could not pay more than 1000. D. a quarter without sensible distress. sometimes & indeed generally, I find it most convenient to pay it in moieties; sometimes the whole sum at once.   the latter has been the case for the present quarter. I now accordingly inclose you a...
Your favor of the 28th. was recieved on the 24th. although mr Skipwith’s error in fact (that the Comptroller’s place was vacant) might supercede the necessity of saying any thing on the subject, yet a desire that he may not refuse what has been offered him, under delusive expectations, induces me to go into explanations with you, in hopes you may find opportunities of rectifying his ideas,...
Your favor of the 2d. was recd on the 7th. & that of the 12th. last night. as you had informed mr Barnes not to write to you to New York after the 4th. and me, that you would notify me of your arrival in Philadelphia, I was awaiting that to answer your letter. I now do it at hazard & shall address it to you at Philadelphia to be kept in the post office till called for. I have not time at this...
Your letters of the 7th. & 10th. were recieved on the 15th., communicated to mr Madison & recieved back from him yesterday. we relinquish the idea of a direct passage to St. Petersburg, and adopt that of a general communication to the government of France through which you will pass. mr Madison will be here within a few days in order that we may arrange and finally expedite whatever is...
Yours of Apr. 24. came to hand some days since, and I now return you the calculation of interest & paiments therein inclosed. the principles of this are understood & approved, and altho my occupations have not permitted me to investigate the calculations in detail, yet I have no doubt of their correctness. I have therefore inclosed you an acknolegement of the balance due Feb. 12. with a...
I recieved last night the inclosed letter, which tho’ not signed I know to be from John Bartram . you will percieve by it that he has prepared the plants seeds &c which I ordered for M. de Liancourt at your request. I write to Bartram to day to deliver them to you and that you will pay him for them. while in Philadelphia you will readily get a hack to carry you to his gardens, about a mile on...
Mr. Barnes & myself have been long sensible that the passing my pecuniary affairs through his hands gave him a great deal of trouble, and at the same time increased mine. it sometimes too occasioned delays, he being very far from the US. bank here, and I close by it. we have at length therefore ceased that circuity and I have opened a direct intercourse with the bank. I consequently this day...
Yours of the 27th. was recieved last night. those of Nov. 25. & Dec. 29. had been recieved in due time. the pressure of business had prevented my acknoleging them. I shall be happy to see you here, and repeat my hope of your taking your daily soup with us when not otherwise engaged.    I have just recieved information that Russia has interdicted to her subjects all intercourse with England,...
Congress have appropriated a sum of money to the procuring books for their use. about one half of it was laid out the last year, but at prices which could not be approved. mr Duane is employed this year to make the importation, partly from Paris, partly from London, and to execute the details. but, as I am anxious to shew that the public money must be laid out with as rigorous economy as that...
In hopes of seeing you before this in Virginia I had [rese]rved the inclosed out of funds in Richmond, where I had supposed it might not be inconvenient for you to recieve it, and where it was more convenient to me, my funds in Washington being otherwise called for. hearing nothing of your being in motion this way, I now inclose it to the care of mr Taylor who I presume will know where you...
Yours of the 2d. inst. has been duly recieved; but I have not had it in my power to make you the inclosed remittance of 500. Dollars till this day. it can only reach you on the evening of the 14th. which I hope may be in time to answer your purpose. Mr. Eppes happened fortunately to have left here the two books he had purchased from mr Barnes. he has returned to him the Atlas to Reynal’s work,...
Yours of the 7th. & 10th. inst. were acknoleged in mine of the 19th. Mr. Madison is now with me and is preparing instructions for you. we now very much wish we had asked you to take a trip here. it is impossible to give on paper so intimate an expression of our views as in conversation, and more difficult in this case than in others because in addition to the general objects of cultivating...
Your favor of May 15. was recieved in due time. you will now recieve inclosed a draught of the US. bank here on that at Philadelphia for 500. D. if I rightly estimate the calls which will come on me the beginning of July I am afraid they will disable me from making the remittance for that month. an unexpected one from Albemarle has deranged the calculations I had made for that epoch. after...
What I now write you must be as secret as the grave. there is at length an unanimity of opinion as to a mission to Petersbg. but some difference as to the time, whether now or not till the meeting of the Senate. but the latter opinion will I think give way to the importance of the mission being so secret that it shall be suspected by no mortal until it is arrived in Petersburg. I write you...
Your letter of the 11th. was recieved last night. in the mean time mine of the 12th. had crossed it on the road, and I hope conveyed safely to your hands the order for 750. D. by the statement inclosed in yours the balance of the 22d. of May was 1537.D78 to which adding 6.15 for interest to the 15th. (by which day the order will be in your hands) and deducting the 750. D. amount of the order,...
Your favors of Feb. 14. & 26. are now before me, and answering first to the former, I inclose you a copy of the cypher as well as of the cyphered letter therein referred to. I have examined the two statements of our account. the first is perfectly intelligible, & right in principle. I have not attempted to examine the calculations, being on the point of departure for Monticello, & not doubting...
Your favor of the 5th. has been duly recieved; and I am very thankful to you as well as to your good friend for the attention you have paid to the commission respecting the Cahusac: and if it’s quality is unchanged, it is a wine which will please here. it will come safely through our Consul at Bordeaux, & the more so as that harbour is not included in the English blockade.   the party division...
On the reciept of your letter of July 23. I wrote to mr Madison expressing my ideas on the several points it presented, and recieved his in return which I now inclose you as containing our joint opinions on them. that which respects the direct voyage will, I am afraid, not be so agreeable to yourself, yet I believe it is indispensible. secrecy is essential, that obstacles may not be prepared...
I inclose you an order of the bank of the US. at this place on that at Philadelphia for five hundred Dollars on the usual account.   I shall leave this place about the latter part of the month for Monticello & after a few days rest there proceed to Bedford from which place however I shall be returned to Monticello by the middle of August. this will be before the time by which you expected to...