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Shall we ever have the pleasure of a visit from you at Quincy. I can Scarcly credit that you Should be so intirely weaned from a place, and Friends whom you once loved and esteemed. I know your avocations are numerous—your time fully occupied, but you may have leisure to visit the Atheneum, when your Friends here are to be no more seen. your uncle and Aunt Cranch have both been very sick. your...
The Bill which Our Tennant has presented must I presume be allowd him: the repairs were necessary I have not any doubt. he ought not however to do these things without consulting us. have you leazed him the place an other Year? does he comply with the terms of his lease? I wish you to keep the Rent you receive always Seperate from any other Charges. I have devoted it the years past to the...
I have found the account and inclose it to you. I wish you to inquire of our Tennant whether the House must be removed and at What price he would undertake to do it? whether any fence will be necessary and whether the place would not be benifitted by planting out a young orchard and a number of fruit trees. I think mr Tiel agreed that he would dig a new cellar & remove the house for 200...
It has been often said, and as often denied, that there are men in this country attached to democracy, simple democracy—to a government in every State, of a single assembly of Representatives, without a Senate and without a Governor; to a government of the nation in a Congress of Delegates in one House, without a Senate and without a President. The charge is supported by the declarations of...
I request the favour of you to insert the foregoing Letter in the next Anthology. It is a material Document in the Life of Washington, as well as in mine and my Sons. As I was bitterly reproached for promoting my Son, though I never did promote him, but only removed him with the same Rank and Appointment from Lisbon to Berlin, Washingtons Letter ought to have been considered as a Justification...
I have advised Messrs. Perkins to print Mr. Cremeres Letter literatim. But it ought to be accompanied with explanatory Notes, E. G. “Narrowly bound” The Writer undoubtedly had in his mind the French phrase “Etroitement lié”—His meaning is “closely or intimately connected”.— “Trespass” Here the French word “Trepas”, which signifies death or decease, was no doubt in the writers mind.— “Carge”...
“The catastrophe of Leyden is to me a most affecting event; a beautiful city where I resided with my children many months, and where I attended divine service on Sundays in the venerable temple where Mr. Robinson and his congregation worshiped for a dozen years before their pilgrimage to Plymouth. This very ancient and revered edifice is now, probably, a mass of ruins. The University of...
I have to thank you for the receipt of your letter of the 14th: instt: and for the last number of the Anthology, which came at the same time—I am much pleased with the Spirit of this publication which appears to improve as it advances, and which I hope you will not suffer to flag—I am much flattered by the partiality of the opinion entertained by the Gentlemen that a regular contribution from...
We arrived safe at Providence on the Evening of the day when we took leave of you in Boston; and the next morning embarked in a Packet which was ready to sail. We were however detained at anchor just below Providence the whole of that day, and the next Night—On Monday we effected with much difficulty our passage to Newport, and sailed from thence on Tuesday Morning—We had every possible...
I yesterday submitted three resolutions to the consideration of the Senate, of which it is probable you will hear more, and perhaps to some federalists in your quarter, they will be thought as wonderful and as lamentable, as one or two of my votes on former occasions. They were rejected by the Senate, with no small degree of indignation express’d by the majority—The yeas and nays, on the two...