You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Shaw, William Smith
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 6

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Shaw, William Smith" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 70 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Shall we ever have the pleasure of a visit from you at Quincy. I can Scarcly credit that you Should be so intirely weaned from a place, and Friends whom you once loved and esteemed. I know your avocations are numerous—your time fully occupied, but you may have leisure to visit the Atheneum, when your Friends here are to be no more seen. your uncle and Aunt Cranch have both been very sick. your...
I request the favour of you to insert the foregoing Letter in the next Anthology. It is a material Document in the Life of Washington, as well as in mine and my Sons. As I was bitterly reproached for promoting my Son, though I never did promote him, but only removed him with the same Rank and Appointment from Lisbon to Berlin, Washingtons Letter ought to have been considered as a Justification...
I have received your two letters of last Week, with a dozen copies of my letter to Mr: Otis—And Mr: Gardiner’s fast Sermon—But the copies which you mention as forwarding with your’s of the 15th: instt: have not come to hand. I thank you most cordially for the promptitude with which you executed the charge of publication—I find the federal newspapers in Boston, which began with a system of...
I will thank you to give the enclosed manuscript to Oliver and Munro, to be published immediately —If they do not chuse to print it you may get any other printer to do it whom you please—It is not meant for electioneering, but for self-defence; and to give the public my views of public affairs—The printers will give perhaps a few copies, for the manuscript—I want only half a dozen—One of which...
Your favour of the 5th: instt: never came to my hands untill yesterday—I have long noticed the characters of the factions which were excited among all the antient nations, in their relations with the Romans—It has been particularly remarked by Montesquieu, and its application to our own Affairs is no new thing in my mind—Modern History is full of the same phenomenon—The English and French...
I will thank you to pay to my father, for me, on or before the 22d: of this month eleven hundred and seventy two dollars and forty-nine cents—being $1081.27. for part principal of a debt due from me to him and $91.22. for a quarter’s interest on the same debt—As you have probably not funds sufficient in your hands to make this payment I enclose you an order to receive the money due to me at...
I wrote you some time since and enclosed an order on the Branch Bank at Boston, to be placed to my credit; since which I have not heard from you. I have now only time to request you to pay to my father two hundred and ninety dollars, on my account—being $250. Divd: on ten Shares in N. E. Mc Insurance Company & $40. for do: on ten Shares in Boston Bank.—I expect in a few days to give you an...
I send you occasionally, the public documents of the most interesting nature, but I have not the opportunity of writing to you so frequently as I could wish—My time is so much engross’d by business equally unpleasant and important that I can very seldom catch a moment for my private affairs, or the more agreeable communications of friendship—I believe I have repeatedly told you as much,...
I received some days since, your letter of the 18th: of last Month—But it was longer in coming than the time usually taken by the mail—and I have left it longer without reply than I could have wished— I am much obliged to you for your attention to my personal affairs, and much gratified that my obligations at the Bank have all been taken up—You will recollect my wish that you would pay to my...
I have not yet had the pleasure of receiving a line from you, which I presume is owing to the multiplicity of your occupations—I have had one letter from my Mother containing the information concerning which we were so anxious, of our children’s health. The Good-Intent has not yet arrived though I observe by a Newspaper that she cleared out from Boston about the 24th: of October—We are in...
I enclosed to you by last Evening’s Mail a Copy of the President’s Message, as first printed by Smith—I now send you a copy together with the documents that accompanied it—You will see that the H.R. have a new Speaker and Clerk—They have this day determined to appoint the standing Committees by ballot instead of leaving their appointment to the Speaker as heretofore—The Washington Races...
We arrived safe at Providence on the Evening of the day when we took leave of you in Boston; and the next morning embarked in a Packet which was ready to sail. We were however detained at anchor just below Providence the whole of that day, and the next Night—On Monday we effected with much difficulty our passage to Newport, and sailed from thence on Tuesday Morning—We had every possible...
I have advised Messrs. Perkins to print Mr. Cremeres Letter literatim. But it ought to be accompanied with explanatory Notes, E. G. “Narrowly bound” The Writer undoubtedly had in his mind the French phrase “Etroitement lié”—His meaning is “closely or intimately connected”.— “Trespass” Here the French word “Trepas”, which signifies death or decease, was no doubt in the writers mind.— “Carge”...
I received in proper time from you, a copy of Selfridge’s trial, and also the Anthology for January, for which you have my best thanks; and in return for which I now send you a blossom for the next month’s basket—I hope your council of Literary botanists will not be of opinion that some of its petals are too rank for the sense; however it is entirely at your and their disposal.—You must shew...
I received some days since your favour of the 19. January, and thank you for the information it contains, and for the trouble you have taken in my individual concerns; I should have been happy to hear frequently from you; but I have been sensible that the multiplicity of your usual occupations, and the extraordinary call upon your time and attention, by the illness and decease of your...
We lost a basket with Caroline’s Clothes in it, from the Chaise as we were coming out of Boston this Evening—I will thank you to have the enclosed advertisement inserted in the Centinel on Saturday Morning—And call at Whitcomb’s, and request him to pay the reward offered, if the basket should be brought there; and charge it to me. Mrs: Adams has concluded to take Mr: Gulliver’s Apartments—I...
I now enclose you the auctioneer’s Bill and will thank you to make out the list of the Books, by their titles , with the prices fixed against them, and get the receipt of the auctioneer upon it, as received of me , which will be necessary for me as a voucher—There are only two volumes (Mason on Elocution, and Carey’s Pocket Atlas, which I purchased for myself, and are not to be included in the...
There is not anything in this world, which lies nearer my heart, or more deeply affects my Mind, then the welfare & happiness of my two Children both here, & in a future state of existence. For you, Is my fondest wish, my ardent Pray’r. And you judged rightly, when you informed me of your late appointment to believe I should sincerely rejoice in any circumstance, which might afford you a...
I have received a letter from my friend Dr: Chapman, informing me of his intention to compile in a series of volumes the best of the modern Orations, both forensic and parliamentary with brief remarks illustrative of each case. He wishes to know if my father’s library contains the Speech of the late Lord Littleton on the Canada-bill, Charles Townshend’s on raising a Revenue in America, so...
There is not anything which lies nearer my heart, or more deeply affects my mind, than the welfare, & happiness of my two Children, both here, & in a future state of Existence. For you, Is my fondest wish, my ardent Prayer. And you judged rightly, when you informed me of your late appointment, to believe, I should sincerely rejoice in any circumstance which might afford you a decent support, &...
I have received an invitation from Mr: Boylston, to dine with him to-morrow—If you see him in town between this and then, will you be so good as to tell him that I much regret that I cannot come, as to-morrow at 2. O’Clock I commence my course of Lectures—And having already postponed it for two weeks, I cannot put it off again. To-day also I am detained here, on account of the Declamations—But...
The Bill which Our Tennant has presented must I presume be allowd him: the repairs were necessary I have not any doubt. he ought not however to do these things without consulting us. have you leazed him the place an other Year? does he comply with the terms of his lease? I wish you to keep the Rent you receive always Seperate from any other Charges. I have devoted it the years past to the...
Since I wrote you last I have not heard directly from you although an interval of several weeks has elapsed—I sent you receipts for Gurley’s & Delille’s Rent, which I presume you have received—On this Idea, I have now to desire that you would enquire whether any dividend on the Stock of the Fire and Marine Insurance Company was made on the first of this Month—And if there was I will thank you...
I have found the account and inclose it to you. I wish you to inquire of our Tennant whether the House must be removed and at What price he would undertake to do it? whether any fence will be necessary and whether the place would not be benifitted by planting out a young orchard and a number of fruit trees. I think mr Tiel agreed that he would dig a new cellar & remove the house for 200...
I have received from you the Anthology for January, for which I thank you—In a letter yesterday to my brother I have made some remarks upon it with which I hope you will not be displeased—Perhaps my own zeal upon a subject of importance, made me more sollicitous concerning one Article in it than was necessary—I should be glad to review the several pamphlets on this subject lately published in...
I have this morning received your favour of the 17th: and thank you for it—I should be glad to thank you more frequently than I have an opportunity to do for such favours. I cannot promise to write you often at much length, but I shall send you as often as I can documents which may be of use to you, and you will attribute to my continual occupations, from which I cannot now at least take upon...
I have to thank you for the receipt of your letter of the 14th: instt: and for the last number of the Anthology, which came at the same time—I am much pleased with the Spirit of this publication which appears to improve as it advances, and which I hope you will not suffer to flag—I am much flattered by the partiality of the opinion entertained by the Gentlemen that a regular contribution from...
Next Monday (the 9th: currt) the Court of Sessions sit at Concord for the County of Middlesex—I have made a draft of a petition to be presented for a Committee to be appointed to appraise damages for the proprietors of Medford farm—Can you go there and present it—if not I will send it to my friend Danl. Adams of Hopkinton as I cannot go myself on account of its being so near last of service...
I want the form of a petition to be presented to the Court of Sessions, praying for a Committee to be appointed to assess damages, in case of property damaged by the proprietors of the Middlesex Canal—If you can not find a form, this side of Cambridge, you must go there and obtain one from the Clerks Office of the Sessions, where I presume you will find some on file— Our Petition must be...
“The catastrophe of Leyden is to me a most affecting event; a beautiful city where I resided with my children many months, and where I attended divine service on Sundays in the venerable temple where Mr. Robinson and his congregation worshiped for a dozen years before their pilgrimage to Plymouth. This very ancient and revered edifice is now, probably, a mass of ruins. The University of...
I have received your letter enclosing Mr: Bradford’s Sermon which I have read with much pleasure; and informing me of the cruel misfortune which has befallen Mr: Smith, for whom, and his excellent lady and family, I feel very much distress’d—If there was any one merchant in Boston on whose safety and stability I should have confided more than any other, he was the man; and to find him thus...
I have this morning received your favor of the 7th, and thank you for it; I should be glad to thank you more frequently than I have an opportunity to do for such favors. I cannot promise to write you often at much length, but I shall send you, as often as I can, documents which may be of use to you; and you will attribute to my continual occupations, from which I cannot now at least take upon...
Some time since I sent you a check on the Branch Bank, in favour of J. Briesler for $45—to be presented if you had previously received the rent of Mr: Gurley, & Delisle, and deposited the money in Bank—I shall have occasion to send another check or two shortly, but untill I have ascertained whether you have received and paid in those monies, I cannot venture to draw; not being sure of having...
I have received both your letters, and to supply the demand from Mr: Briesler, now enclose a check on the Branch Bank, for $45. In paying it I wish you to tell Mr: Briesler, that I hope to have no more charges of expence upon the farm, exceeding his estimates by more than double. As to the new assessment on the Middlesex Canal, they must wait for the payment of that, untill I come home—In...
I enclosed from New-York, for you, as you requested, a copy of Commodore Morris’s Defence, which I presume you have before this received, and which you will find an interesting and important pamphlet.—As you are fond of preserving public documents I now send you that part of the President’s Message, with the accompanying papers, which is now printed; you shall have the remainder as it issues...
I enclose an order for $110. which I will thank you to present, and if accepted, receive the money—This together with the rent you have received of Mr: Dexter, will pay the assessmt: due on my Bridge-Shares, and leave a Balance—I will thank you to pay the Assessmt: to Mr: Foster, and take the rect:— Please to send me word whether you have advertised the rooms in Whitcomb’s House and if so,...
I left at Washington a couple of trunks to be sent round by water—A Gentleman was here yesterday, who tells me they are arrived; and landed—That he saw them at Lee and Dana’s store N: 22. long-wharf. I will be much obliged to you, to call there and see; and if they are there to send me out one of them (the square hair-covered one) in the carriage this afternoon—I presume the freight is not...
Congress have agreed to adjourn this day week—I propose to leave this place a few days afterwards—Shall stop a few days at New–York; and hope within a month to see you in Boston. We are in the midst of a discussion on a bill to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—The History of this is not a little curious; but I must reserve an account of it, for a future occasion—While I...
I have received and thank you for your favour of 25. Feby: In consequence I suppose of the great fall of snow, which you mention, we have had here eight days of cold as severe as at almost any period of the Winter. The House of Representatives have agreed to adjourn on the 19th: instt: with which it is probable the Senate will concur.— My children have both bad colds—We are apprehensive they...
I inclose you an order on Mr: Gurley, for the Rent which will be due on the 18th: of next month—And also a letter which I will thank you to send or deliver. I have sent my brother for some time past, regularly, the materials, for information what we are about here—The want of this information is so apparent in the newspapers, that one would imagine it of no sort of consequence in your part of...
I inclose you two bills, now pending before the two Houses of Congress, which I wish may be immediately published in the newspapers at Boston, as one or the other of them will in all probability pass in some shape or other, and I apprehend will be productive of important consequences not only to the commerce but to the peace of the United States. The zeal upon this occasion is of such burning...
I yesterday submitted three resolutions to the consideration of the Senate, of which it is probable you will hear more, and perhaps to some federalists in your quarter, they will be thought as wonderful and as lamentable, as one or two of my votes on former occasions. They were rejected by the Senate, with no small degree of indignation express’d by the majority—The yeas and nays, on the two...
I have particular reasons for requesting you to inform me who the member of Congress was, from whom Mr: Russell received the letter he shewed you, containing remarks on my conduct with points of admiration, and the quotation from Virgil—The knowledge of his name will in every probability enable me to make such explanations to him as will be entirely satisfactory to him and to me.—As Mr Russell...
I received yesterday your favour of the 13th: instt: inclosing a strip from the Centinel for the history of which I am much obliged to you—I had already seen it and have written a long letter to Mr: Hall, containing my observations upon it, which I presume he will communicate either in tenor or substance to you—I do not impute either the writing or the publication of those remarks to a...
I received last evening with much pleasure your favour of the 5th: instt:—I had been so long without any intelligence from home, that I began to be uneasy—And even now, I cannot but wish you had said something about the family at Quincy—I believe it is more than a month since I have heard from thence, at all—I am anxious particularly to know the state of health of my dear mother. I am much...
I see by the newspapers that a tenth assessment has been made on the Neponset Bridge Shares; of $38 on each share; which of course makes my shares chargeable with $228—for the payment of which I will thank you to receive, Whitcomb’s quarter’s rent due 1. January next;—this will be $200—and the balance, please to pay from any balance you may have in your hands—If you have none, I will send you...
I have sent off by a Vessel bound for Boston the greater part of my Books, and consigned them to the care of Mr: Smith, to whom please deliver the enclosed. If there be any place to stow away boxes at Quincy I wish you to Charter a Boat & send them right away from on board the Schooner Dexter, as the less land carriage they may be exposed to, the better. Of this projet, you may consider &...
I received your favor of the 3d: in due course with a letter from Washington for my Brother. I have this moment taken from the Post Office a letter from him to me, written at New Ark, where he has been detained by the illness of his wife, since Sunday the 9th: inst: He expected however to be on his journey again on Wednesday, and hopes to be at Frankford, friday or Saturday. I will thank you...
To receive the money, from John Green—and settle with Captain Brazier for the blinds. To receive the monies on the Accounts of Mr: Poor, of Newbury-Port. of Mr: W. Coolidge P. C. Brooks. of Mr: McIntire of Captn: Fenno. To attend to the Exon: of H. College vs Simpson. Do:—on the actions at Dedham. To receive on the 18th: of Novr: $140:89—for Rent of the House in Court Street, and $150 every...
I enclose you a letter for Mr Paine which I will thank you to hand him. Our City is dull and much deserted, on account of the apprehensions, which the appearance of a malignant fever has excited. I have been and still am detained by business in the District Court, which I hope however to Settle on Tuesday. If so, I go out of town on Wednesday to pass a week or ten days in Jersey, and if I can...