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I had not time to write before the departure of the post to day, to both you & my mother, and having received a letter from her she was best entitled to my earliest regards, though, if I rightly remember, you favor written at Suffield has not yet been acknowledged— Watsons Bill is enclosed as you desire—Dickins is not your debtor. But you are his to the amount of four or five dollars, as I...
Your letter of the 29th: ulto: is just received, with the papers enclosed, for which I thank you—The address of the Legislature is friendly—Answer proper —The letter, which is published in the Commercial Gazette, as from the Washington federalist, I had read with great satisfaction, in manuscript—I hope to grasp the hand that wrote it in a few months—The gentleman will find it more difficult...
I have your letter of the 17th:, which travelled, from Boston hither, in very agreeable company. I can readily conceive, the novelty of your situation in a Lawyer’s office, joined to other novelties of quite as pleasant a nature, would tend to distract your thoughts, for some time. Without undertaking to advise you on the subject of your recent pursuit, I will barely say, that the Office of my...
The trial of the Gentlemen who were indicted for a Riot & Assault & Battery upon William Duane, was lately decided in the Mayor’s Court. Counsel for the Prosecutor were Dickerson, Cooper & Dallas—for Defendants, M. Levy and Rawle. By a mode of proceeding before this Court, the Defendant may first plead the general issue, Non cut and afterwards retract it, & submit to the Court, protesting his...
I enclose you a paper, which contains the Sentence referred to in my last, passed upon the troopers who flogged Duane. You will be able to form from the perusal of it, a more accurate opinion of the merits, than you could from my statement. The Circuit Court of the United States, under the new organization, opened on Monday—Present the three Judges. I attended & heard the charge delivered by...
It falls to my lot to do things so repugnant to my inclination & so contrary to my Sense of Strict propriety, that I know not what apology to offer for complying, in opposition to both, with the absurd customs of the times, which so often impose a necessity of thus betraying my judgment. What answer can be given to a man, who after living for a few months under the same roof with you, though...
I have paid you all I owed in the article of letters, but I receive few communications from home. Please to tell my mother that I like to know, now and then, a little of the Cabinet secrets. The Report that the negociation with France is broken off, creates considerable sensation here & at New York—I think few people actually believe the story, but it serves the turn of newspaper Scriblers to...
I have your letter of the 14th: with a paper for which I thank you. Mr: Reed has written to you, in consequence of the information respecting the demur, about delivering his trunk, and contrary to my advice, has sent money to pay Bills, which he says he had already, once discharged. I never will recommend any of my friends to that vile house so help me, truth! Since my return, I have been more...
I thank you for the pamphlet & newspaper. In return, I send you the New York L. J. Brutus—rather a repetition of what has been written on the Same Subject, than any thing new—Oldschool & I disagree as to the author of Philalethes—I say the hand is not visible; but he thinks it is. We have Duane again before the Circuit Court and he tried to manage his own cause; but before he had blundered &...
You apologize so handsomely in your letter of the 9th ult. for your long silence towards me, that I cannot find in my heart to retaliate; indeed I should do so much violence to myself, by an attempt to break off our correspondence that you may venture to assure yourself of its continuance. You gave me much information, which I could have learnt from nobody else, and I shall place my trust in...
Your favor of the 23d: ult: accompanied by one for Mr: Newman, I received a few days since, on my return from Chester Court; where I had been attending the Quarter sessions of Delaware County, four days. A criminal cause of considerable importance, viz an indictment for perjury, was tried, and by invitation of the deputy Atty Genl: I took part on the side of the prosecution. There was room for...
I received your short note, accompanying the Oration delivered by my brother, before the Charitable fire Association, and thank you for the promptness of your attention in transmitting it. The perusal of it was a rich repast, and though its merit did not surpass, it fully equalled my expectations. I am yet to hear from you, in answer to some of my late communications. You have certainly lost...
I have done little else but scribble for three weeks past, either letters of business or friendship, and have not found time to write scarcely a line to you. I made enquiry for Mr. Jenkins, now Lord Hawkesbury’s work, which you wrote for, but cannot procure it here. Yesterday I delivered to Mr: William Sell two of young Charles Jared Ingersolls tragedy, one for you and one for my Mother....
I am desired by Mr: Reed to be instrumental in procuring your services, touching the enclosed draught or order; which, when paid, you may remit, either directly to Reed, or to me; though, as I have no interest in the affair I Should not wish to be any way responsible, in case of failure or accident. Your favor of the 23d: with the enclosures, has been in hand a few hours—and I have read the...
It has been often said, and as often denied, that there are men in this country attached to democracy, simple democracy—to a government in every State, of a single assembly of Representatives, without a Senate and without a Governor; to a government of the nation in a Congress of Delegates in one House, without a Senate and without a President. The charge is supported by the declarations of...
Accept my hearty thanks for the flattering account your letter contains of my Mother’s promised recovery—It is indeed grateful intelligence and serves to console me under the painful prospect of being obliged soon to fly from this now infected City. You will see, that the Board of health, which in my opinion ought rather to be styled a board of pestilence have at last come out; after being...
I thank you for your favor of the 19th: with an enclosure and receipt from Mr: Ritchie. The civil things you please to say, are passed to your credit , in my books. When I see Mr: Chauncey, I will remind him of his promise to you and if I can purchase the letters to Col: Burr, will Send them forward. I have never seen these letters, though So much has been said about them. Your lamentations on...
I shall trouble Mr T. Adams to forward, by some favourable Opportunity, these few Lines of Thanks for the elegant & ingenious Oration so kindly sent by you; & which I read with great Pleasure, as I had not long before another Oration from the same Pen, delivered in Boston. It must be a great Satisfaction to our late worthy President, to behold a Son so worthy of him supporting the Reputation...
I will write again, & believe I have a Son , with whom I should delight to converse, & communicate every little occurrence, that may from local circumstances, & there connections be interesting to friendship, or affection; though from the length of time, since he has written to his Mother, One might conclude, he believed she lived beyond the Alps, in the frigid Zone, where all the Charities,...
Your favour of the 24th: is before me, and I most ardently hope the information respecting the prospect of my mother’s recovery may not prove delusive. I expected a letter from my brother by this day’s mail, but am disappointed. My suspence & anxiety have been extreme for ten days past, and nothing but your letter, which assures me, that my mother was considerably better, has relieved my...
I enclose you a letter for Mr Paine which I will thank you to hand him. Our City is dull and much deserted, on account of the apprehensions, which the appearance of a malignant fever has excited. I have been and still am detained by business in the District Court, which I hope however to Settle on Tuesday. If so, I go out of town on Wednesday to pass a week or ten days in Jersey, and if I can...
To receive the money, from John Green—and settle with Captain Brazier for the blinds. To receive the monies on the Accounts of Mr: Poor, of Newbury-Port. of Mr: W. Coolidge P. C. Brooks. of Mr: McIntire of Captn: Fenno. To attend to the Exon: of H. College vs Simpson. Do:—on the actions at Dedham. To receive on the 18th: of Novr: $140:89—for Rent of the House in Court Street, and $150 every...
I received your favor of the 3d: in due course with a letter from Washington for my Brother. I have this moment taken from the Post Office a letter from him to me, written at New Ark, where he has been detained by the illness of his wife, since Sunday the 9th: inst: He expected however to be on his journey again on Wednesday, and hopes to be at Frankford, friday or Saturday. I will thank you...
I have sent off by a Vessel bound for Boston the greater part of my Books, and consigned them to the care of Mr: Smith, to whom please deliver the enclosed. If there be any place to stow away boxes at Quincy I wish you to Charter a Boat & send them right away from on board the Schooner Dexter, as the less land carriage they may be exposed to, the better. Of this projet, you may consider &...
I see by the newspapers that a tenth assessment has been made on the Neponset Bridge Shares; of $38 on each share; which of course makes my shares chargeable with $228—for the payment of which I will thank you to receive, Whitcomb’s quarter’s rent due 1. January next;—this will be $200—and the balance, please to pay from any balance you may have in your hands—If you have none, I will send you...
I received last evening with much pleasure your favour of the 5th: instt:—I had been so long without any intelligence from home, that I began to be uneasy—And even now, I cannot but wish you had said something about the family at Quincy—I believe it is more than a month since I have heard from thence, at all—I am anxious particularly to know the state of health of my dear mother. I am much...
I received yesterday your favour of the 13th: instt: inclosing a strip from the Centinel for the history of which I am much obliged to you—I had already seen it and have written a long letter to Mr: Hall, containing my observations upon it, which I presume he will communicate either in tenor or substance to you—I do not impute either the writing or the publication of those remarks to a...
I have particular reasons for requesting you to inform me who the member of Congress was, from whom Mr: Russell received the letter he shewed you, containing remarks on my conduct with points of admiration, and the quotation from Virgil—The knowledge of his name will in every probability enable me to make such explanations to him as will be entirely satisfactory to him and to me.—As Mr Russell...
I yesterday submitted three resolutions to the consideration of the Senate, of which it is probable you will hear more, and perhaps to some federalists in your quarter, they will be thought as wonderful and as lamentable, as one or two of my votes on former occasions. They were rejected by the Senate, with no small degree of indignation express’d by the majority—The yeas and nays, on the two...
I inclose you two bills, now pending before the two Houses of Congress, which I wish may be immediately published in the newspapers at Boston, as one or the other of them will in all probability pass in some shape or other, and I apprehend will be productive of important consequences not only to the commerce but to the peace of the United States. The zeal upon this occasion is of such burning...
I inclose you an order on Mr: Gurley, for the Rent which will be due on the 18th: of next month—And also a letter which I will thank you to send or deliver. I have sent my brother for some time past, regularly, the materials, for information what we are about here—The want of this information is so apparent in the newspapers, that one would imagine it of no sort of consequence in your part of...
I have received and thank you for your favour of 25. Feby: In consequence I suppose of the great fall of snow, which you mention, we have had here eight days of cold as severe as at almost any period of the Winter. The House of Representatives have agreed to adjourn on the 19th: instt: with which it is probable the Senate will concur.— My children have both bad colds—We are apprehensive they...
Congress have agreed to adjourn this day week—I propose to leave this place a few days afterwards—Shall stop a few days at New–York; and hope within a month to see you in Boston. We are in the midst of a discussion on a bill to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—The History of this is not a little curious; but I must reserve an account of it, for a future occasion—While I...
I left at Washington a couple of trunks to be sent round by water—A Gentleman was here yesterday, who tells me they are arrived; and landed—That he saw them at Lee and Dana’s store N: 22. long-wharf. I will be much obliged to you, to call there and see; and if they are there to send me out one of them (the square hair-covered one) in the carriage this afternoon—I presume the freight is not...
I enclose an order for $110. which I will thank you to present, and if accepted, receive the money—This together with the rent you have received of Mr: Dexter, will pay the assessmt: due on my Bridge-Shares, and leave a Balance—I will thank you to pay the Assessmt: to Mr: Foster, and take the rect:— Please to send me word whether you have advertised the rooms in Whitcomb’s House and if so,...
I enclosed from New-York, for you, as you requested, a copy of Commodore Morris’s Defence, which I presume you have before this received, and which you will find an interesting and important pamphlet.—As you are fond of preserving public documents I now send you that part of the President’s Message, with the accompanying papers, which is now printed; you shall have the remainder as it issues...
I have received both your letters, and to supply the demand from Mr: Briesler, now enclose a check on the Branch Bank, for $45. In paying it I wish you to tell Mr: Briesler, that I hope to have no more charges of expence upon the farm, exceeding his estimates by more than double. As to the new assessment on the Middlesex Canal, they must wait for the payment of that, untill I come home—In...
Some time since I sent you a check on the Branch Bank, in favour of J. Briesler for $45—to be presented if you had previously received the rent of Mr: Gurley, & Delisle, and deposited the money in Bank—I shall have occasion to send another check or two shortly, but untill I have ascertained whether you have received and paid in those monies, I cannot venture to draw; not being sure of having...
I have this morning received your favor of the 7th, and thank you for it; I should be glad to thank you more frequently than I have an opportunity to do for such favors. I cannot promise to write you often at much length, but I shall send you, as often as I can, documents which may be of use to you; and you will attribute to my continual occupations, from which I cannot now at least take upon...
I have received your letter enclosing Mr: Bradford’s Sermon which I have read with much pleasure; and informing me of the cruel misfortune which has befallen Mr: Smith, for whom, and his excellent lady and family, I feel very much distress’d—If there was any one merchant in Boston on whose safety and stability I should have confided more than any other, he was the man; and to find him thus...
“The catastrophe of Leyden is to me a most affecting event; a beautiful city where I resided with my children many months, and where I attended divine service on Sundays in the venerable temple where Mr. Robinson and his congregation worshiped for a dozen years before their pilgrimage to Plymouth. This very ancient and revered edifice is now, probably, a mass of ruins. The University of...
I want the form of a petition to be presented to the Court of Sessions, praying for a Committee to be appointed to assess damages, in case of property damaged by the proprietors of the Middlesex Canal—If you can not find a form, this side of Cambridge, you must go there and obtain one from the Clerks Office of the Sessions, where I presume you will find some on file— Our Petition must be...
Next Monday (the 9th: currt) the Court of Sessions sit at Concord for the County of Middlesex—I have made a draft of a petition to be presented for a Committee to be appointed to appraise damages for the proprietors of Medford farm—Can you go there and present it—if not I will send it to my friend Danl. Adams of Hopkinton as I cannot go myself on account of its being so near last of service...
I have to thank you for the receipt of your letter of the 14th: instt: and for the last number of the Anthology, which came at the same time—I am much pleased with the Spirit of this publication which appears to improve as it advances, and which I hope you will not suffer to flag—I am much flattered by the partiality of the opinion entertained by the Gentlemen that a regular contribution from...
I have this morning received your favour of the 17th: and thank you for it—I should be glad to thank you more frequently than I have an opportunity to do for such favours. I cannot promise to write you often at much length, but I shall send you as often as I can documents which may be of use to you, and you will attribute to my continual occupations, from which I cannot now at least take upon...
I have received from you the Anthology for January, for which I thank you—In a letter yesterday to my brother I have made some remarks upon it with which I hope you will not be displeased—Perhaps my own zeal upon a subject of importance, made me more sollicitous concerning one Article in it than was necessary—I should be glad to review the several pamphlets on this subject lately published in...
I have found the account and inclose it to you. I wish you to inquire of our Tennant whether the House must be removed and at What price he would undertake to do it? whether any fence will be necessary and whether the place would not be benifitted by planting out a young orchard and a number of fruit trees. I think mr Tiel agreed that he would dig a new cellar & remove the house for 200...
Since I wrote you last I have not heard directly from you although an interval of several weeks has elapsed—I sent you receipts for Gurley’s & Delille’s Rent, which I presume you have received—On this Idea, I have now to desire that you would enquire whether any dividend on the Stock of the Fire and Marine Insurance Company was made on the first of this Month—And if there was I will thank you...
The Bill which Our Tennant has presented must I presume be allowd him: the repairs were necessary I have not any doubt. he ought not however to do these things without consulting us. have you leazed him the place an other Year? does he comply with the terms of his lease? I wish you to keep the Rent you receive always Seperate from any other Charges. I have devoted it the years past to the...
I have received an invitation from Mr: Boylston, to dine with him to-morrow—If you see him in town between this and then, will you be so good as to tell him that I much regret that I cannot come, as to-morrow at 2. O’Clock I commence my course of Lectures—And having already postponed it for two weeks, I cannot put it off again. To-day also I am detained here, on account of the Declamations—But...