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Harrassed with interruptions & worn down with fatigue; I take up my pen at midnight to scribble you a line. Mr. Nicholas who sets out by day light promises to call and give you the particulars of this place, & I will inclose a paper just recieved giving the details of an armistice between France & Austria, a second great victory, and the commencement of hostilities by England against Russia,...
I mentioned to you in my letter by mr Nicholas that I should be able by this post to fix a day for the departure of Davy Bowles with my chair & horses, & that he should be in readiness. though it is impossible for me to say to a day when I can set out from hence, yet I expect it may be by the time you recieve this. I would therefore have him set off from Monticello on Saturday the 21st. inst....
I snatch half a moment to inform you that a circumstance has occurred which will inevitably keep me a week longer or thereabouts. in the mean time my horses will wait I presume at Heron’s. my tender love to my dear Martha, & the little ones. Affectionate attachment to yourself. P.S. I do not know if there is any merit in the music inclosed. It has been sent to me. RC ( DLC ); endorsed by...
I am still here, & not yet absolutely certain of the moment I can get off. I fear I shall this evening recieve a 4th. refusal of the Secretaryship of the Navy. should it take place, I have fixed on a temporary arrangement, & in any event expect to get away in the course of 3. or 4. days, so as to be with you by the time you recieve this or very soon after. it is the getting the Naval...
I take up my pen merely because I have not written to you since my arrival here, and simply to inform you I am well. I shall be happy to hear the same from you; and hope this day’s post may bring me that information, or that Fontrees’s waggon will do it which I expect will arrive tomorrow or next day. we are selling off all our vessels except the 13. frigates established by law; bringing 7 of...
Your’s of May 30. came to hand yesterday. I wrote to Martha on the 28th. I have never heard from the Hundred since I left home. and indeed have been so pressed with business that I have never written but once .—two of our frigates are arrived here to be laid up . 3. more are expected. 2 others will remain where they are, the one to be repaired, the other to be sold as good for nothing if...
Yesterday came to hand your favor of the 13th. with the pleasing information of the health of the family. I recieved at the same time a letter of June 12. from mr Eppes informing me of his & Maria’s health, that he was then engaged in his harvest, and as soon as that should be over he proposed to go up to Monticello with Maria. he expressed great regret at not having removed her there sooner....
I expect to leave this on Thursday; but unforeseen business may protract it. I expect consequently to be with you on Sunday or some early day after that. we have nothing to be depended on from Egypt. the Northern difference is probably settled. the K. of England has desired it to be notified to our government that, understanding we were about to send a squadron into the Mediterranean for the...
In a letter written to you (the last fall, I believe) I took occasion to mention to you that should a certain event take place it would be in my power to aid you in the course of the present year; and the paiment to Gibson & Jefferson of 450. D. in February was intended only in part of what I had further meditated. the event has happened; and yet such are the extraordinary expences of an...
I am happy to hear that the children are likely to bear the attack of the whooping cough with vigour. it is a most unfortunate season for it to have come on; and I cannot but be anxious about them through the whole winter: consequently desirous to hear as often as possible how they are. my business I find will often prevent my writing by post. it is now got to a steady & uniform course. it...
A gentleman here has occasion for a particular purpose to consult the Preliminary discourse written by Dalembert to the antient encyclopedia, which was in fact a developement of Bacon’s Arbor scientiae . it is in one of the volumes (the 1st. I believe) of the Melanges de literature in 5. vols. 12. mo. which you will find in the press on the right side of the cherry sash door in my cabinet. I...
I inclose you a pamphlet giving some account of the new operation of making cloths &c. waterproof; as also a piece of paper, one half of which is waterproof. I have recieved cloth for a surtout coat, which I find, on wearing it in rain, to answer perfectly. the prices for making cloathes waterproof are so moderate, that if it does not injure the quality of the stuff, it will become extensively...
My last letter from Edgehill was of the 6th. of Dec. I wrote you on the 1st. inst. the debate on the repeal of the last judiciary law was commenced in the Senate yesterday. it has also been touched on in the other house, where some members, generally sound, will have some qualms on this subject, because they are afraid to distinguish between a fraudulent use of the constitution, and a...
Prince Ruspoli, a Roman Noble proposing in a tour which he is taking to Rockbridge, to pass by Monticello, I take the liberty of addressing him to your attentions. he will probably pass one evening only at Milton or Charlottesville; and, if you could ride with him to Monticello, he would probably be gratified by it, and have his enquiries more satisfactorily answered, than by mr Dinsmore, to...
I am made happy by the regular accounts of the health of the inhabitants of Edgehill. here there has been an uncommon degree of sickness; ascribed of course to the mild winter, tho’ we cannot see why. The H. of R. have now been a week debating the judiciary law, and scarcely seem to be yet on the threshold of it. I begin to apprehend a long session: however I believe all material matters...
All is well here, as I hope with you also, & I have not time to say more except that the question decisive of the bill repealing the late judiciary law in the H. of R. will not be taken till tomorrow or next day. my love to my dear Martha & the young ones. RC ( DLC ); address clipped: “Thomas Mann R[andolph] at […]”; franked and postmarked; endorsed by Randolph.
I recieved two days ago your favor of the 6th. and am very glad you made to me a full communication of your intentions, as I feel no resources within myself or without which could have supported me under the idea of separation which popular report might have brought to me. how far the enterprize may be adviseable, I am not qualified to judge; nor am I able to give you much information on the...
Your’s of the 13th. is recieved. I promised in my last I would make enquiry of mr Milledge of Augusta in Savanna on the subject of cotton, because he is a great cultivator of it, in fact the introducer of it there, very accurate & judicious. he says the blackseed cotton is cultivated in the country below Augusta, the green seed above. the former sells for 40. cents when the latter is at 20....
Yours of the 20th. has been duly recieved. my former letters will have informed you that the lands offered by Sibbald are real pine barrens & will not bring corn at all; but that the pine lands mixed with oak and a clay foundation bring good crops of corn & wheat. in a conversation which Capt Lewis had with mr Milledge the latter observed that after getting to the hilly country, some distance...
I forgot this was post day till the moment of the mail’s being made up. I have only time therefore to say Congress rises tomorrow. mr Milledge & mr Clarke will probably set out in the evening, be at Orange courthouse on Wednesday evening & go thence to dine with you on Thursday. I shall be two or three days after them. tender love to my dear Martha & the young people & affectionate attachment...
This will be handed you by mr Milledge who takes the route by Edgehill on purpose to give you information on the subject of Georgia. mr Clarke, a son of Genl. Clarke, of that state is with him. he is a sensible young man & has been studying the law here some time under John Thompson Mason. having before mentioned these gentlemen in my letters, nothing more need be added. I wrote to you by...
Your’s of the 16th. is recieved. there is nobody here who can give me any information of the law of S.C. Doctr. Tucker, the only person here from that state, having been too long from it to possess the information you wish. I have written for it to Genl. Sumpter at Statesborough, and think we may have an answer in three weeks from this time, which may be communicated to you by the middle of...
Your’s of Oct. 29. has been recieved. the day after my last letter to you, say Oct. 23. I enquired of Doctr. Tucker as to the difficulty of getting your negroes across the state of S.C. he could give me no information but he wrote the next day to Govr. Drayton , & I think his answer & General Sumpter’s will be here about the time of your own arrival here. The favorable expressions in your...
The family arrived here yesterday morning without any accident, as Martha will probably inform you by her own letter. I inclose you a letter from Genl. Sumpter, lately recieved. I do not think the aspect flattering from his statement, altho’ he supposes no difficulty in an application to the legislature. but we know that applications to legislatures for special dispensations from law are...
I now inclose you Govr. Drayton’s answer to Doctr. Tucker by which you will percieve that there is no prospect of getting your negroes through the state of S.C. in the present state of their laws; and as to alterations to be made in these, they are too precarious to affect your plans in the least. you will have to go therefore either through Tennissee or by water. it is said that the former...
Genl. Sumpter has arrived here and I have this morning had a conversaton with him on the subject of the law of S. Carolina against the transportation of slaves across that state. he says there would be no doubt of the success of an application to the legislature while in session for a special permission, & that he met large emigrations of slaves going on upon that assurance but the legislature...
Your’s from Gordon’s did not reach me till the 15th. and was the first information which relieved us from the state of anxious suspense into which we had been thrown by reports of the difficulties & delays you met with at Bullrun. yesterday morning John & the carriage got back. I rejoice that the journey has been accomplished without any sinister accident; for a journey with a family in winter...
Your’s of the 29th. came to hand last night only, so it has loitered a post somewhere. I am sorry you have succeeded by so small a majority in your election. the danger is that as in Albemarle you had 5 times as many good votes as your competitor, you may also have had 5. times as many bad ones; & the trial will be before judges ⅓ or ¼ of whom will be predetermined against you, so that a few...
I am sorry to have to inform you of the dangerous situation of our friend Peter Carr at mr Hollins’s at Baltimore. yesterday was sennight he was taken suddenly & violently ill. gravel entered certainly into the complaint, but whether something bilious was not also a part of it seems doubtful. on Tuesday I recieved from mr Hollins the first information of his illness & danger, & his wish to see...
My previous letter of this day’s date (now gone to the post office) gave you information of mr Carr’s situation to June 1. 6 aclock P.M. a letter from mr Hollins , 12 hours later, (yesterday morning) who had sat up with him the preceding night, says he was better, & he began to have hopes he might recover. Adieu. RC ( PW Wilbur S. Howell, ed., Jefferson’s Parliamentary Writings, Princeton,...
I wrote you two letters yesterday by the direct post. in the evening I recieved the two now inclosed, and altho’ I do not know that sending them by Richmond they can get to you sooner than if sent by our next post of Wednesday, yet I take that chance, to lessen the anxiety of yesterday’s accounts. affectionate salutations RC ( DLC ); endorsed by Randolph as received 10 June. Recorded in SJL...
Your’s of May 30. has been recieved. should Brown recover so that the law shall inflict no punishment on Cary, it will be necessary for me to make an example of him in terrorem to others, in order to maintain the police so rigorously necessary among the nailboys. there are generally negro purchasers from Georgia passing about the state, to one of whom I would rather he should be sold than to...
In a letter of May 2. to mr Peyton I had said to him that if Henderson, counting on the indulgence I have used in leaving his dam hitherto, should propose to sell his 4. acres as a mill seat, I would immediately direct mr Lilly to take down the dam, and I desired mr Peyton to employ counsel & obtain an order for a mill on my part of the lands, but still to act in his own name & keep me out of...
As possibly an authentic copy of the decree against Henderson may be wanted at the hearing of his & Peyton’s applications for an order of court for a mill, I have procured one from Richmond & inclose it to you. you will observe the level to which it restores & confirms my right is that at which the water stood at the confines between Henderson & myself , before the erection of his dam. that is...
On the evening of the 3d inst. we recieved a letter from mr King (arrived at N. York) covering one from Livingston & Monroe to him in which they informed him that on the 30th. of April they signed a treaty with France, ceding to us the island of N. Orleans and all Louisiana as it had been held by Spain. the price is not mentioned. we are in hourly expectation of the treaty by a special...
The arrival of the treaty of cession of Louisiana last night, and the short day given for ratification (Oct. 30.) will oblige me to call Congress about the middle of that month; & consequently to return here earlier than I had calculated; I shall therefore go home earlier. I think I shall be with you on Friday or Saturday next. my affectionate love to all of you.—the price of Louisiana...
I have been so closely engaged since I came here that I have not had time to write any letter which could be postponed. this place is unusually healthy. some persons from Alexandria have been taken with the fever here & died, without communicating it: so that we consider our rural situation as perfectly exempt from the danger. it seems to get worse in Alexandria, Philadelphia & New York, & so...
The post of last night brings us agreeable information from New Orleans & Natchez. Genl. Wilkinson arrived at N. Orleans from Mobille Nov. 25. settled immediately with Laussat all the circumstances of the delivery, & proceeded next day to Fort Adams, where he would arrive on the 30th. & expect to meet Claiborne there ready for embarcation. on the 29th. Laussat demanded possession of the...
I have but a single moment to announce to you the death of Trist at N. Orleans. one letter brought us news of his extreme illness, and another, by the same post, of his death. the situation of his family is to be deplored indeed; and I am afraid they will expect what the public mind will not admit. God bless you all. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have learnt with extreme concern the rupture between Craven & Lilly, and percieve that it will become extremely embarassing & prejudicial to my affairs unless it can be made up. this can only be done by an oblivion of the past without going into any enquiry which was most in the wrong. I have pressed this in a conversation with Craven, & I think he may be brought to. I have written with...
Mr. John D. Burke who is writing the history of Virginia, sollicits very strongly the opportunity of examining so much of the collection of laws and newspapers at Monticello as relates to the period between Bacon’s rebellion & 1752. I must therefore get the favor of you to take from the library at Monticello the vols of newspapers from the beginning (1744) to 1752. also that volume of the...
I recieved a letter yesterday from Lilly which gives me great disquietude. he has hitherto been on wages of £ 50. and £ 10. additional for the nailery. he writes me that he cannot stay after the present year for less than £ 100. certainly I can never get a man who fulfills my purposes better than he does: and if a moderate advance, as from 60. to £ 75. would have sufficed, I would have given...
Yours of the 22d. is at hand. there has been not only no new appointment of Consul at Bordeaux, but no idea that there will be a vacancy there. we know that mr Lee has given mortal offence to several of our merchants by refusing to cover foreign vessels under our flag, which he and all the other Consuls are instructed to be particularly vigilant in. he has been very meritoriously so, and his...
It is with an aching heart I take up my pen, & this circumstance must apologise for my interference in the present case. but where every thing which I hold dear in this world is at stake, where the future happiness of our whole family, or their future misery unmixed & unabating, are hanging in even suspence, [it] must be justifiable to urge our rights to a due share of w[eight] in your...
I inclose you some newspapers which I will ask the favor of you to keep & return to me when I come home. they will shew you that the best founded hopes of an advantageous accomodation with England may possibly be blasted by our own indiscretions. letters from Monroe to the 20th. of May shewed mr Fox still well disposed in himself, but embarrassed & betraying unexpected hesitations. these were...
Your letter of the 5th. came to hand on the 7th. & at the same time the Enquirer of the 4th. from the two together I derived inexpressible consolation: because while the Enquirer contained a piece which shewed that the other party did not propose, for any thing which had yet past to remove the question from before the tribunal of the public, your letter gave me confidence that if that piece...
I inclose a letter for Colo. C. L. Lewis of Buckisland, which, from it’s contents, will justify my asking you to send it by express & without delay. it is left open for your perusal, and you will be so good as to stick a wafer in it. immediately on recieving mr Speer’s directions, I remitted 50. D. to mr Moore of Baltimore for him. I percieve that to make up the 43½ D. you must have put in 12....
This will be handed you by mr Brodie, an English gentleman, looking out for a settlement in this country to which he may bring his family, & live in quiet & retirement. he proposes to purchase a farm which he will employ as a grazing farm, merely to give him something to do, depending on other resources for his principal support. he has a preference for our part of the country, & I have...
Yesterday was sennight I wrote to Reuben Lewis, informing him he might hourly expect his brother there. I meant the next day which was the post day, to have written it to you also, but was in the intervening evening taken with the Autumnal fever so as to be unable to write. the attack was slight, & I am now perfectly recovered, and engaged in taking the repeating doses of bark. We have no...
Believing a letter will still find you at home, I drop you a line to give you the Western news. a letter from Wilkerson of Nov. 30. from N. Orleans informs us he is there & his troops coming down the red river to him; & that he is preparing to cover that place from Burr. this letter comes by water & is therefore here before those we are to infer are on the road informing us of his having...