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I recieved yesterday mr Randolph’s letter of the 23d. giving me the always welcome news of your health. I have not heard from Maria since I have been here. it is a terrible thing that people will not write unless they have materials to make a long letter: when three words would be so acceptable. Mrs. Madison left us two days ago, to commence housekeeping, so that Capt Lewis & myself are like...
Your’s of the 19. came to hand yesterday. as it says nothing of your health I presume all are well. I recieved yesterday also a letter from Maria of the 18th. she was then well & preparing to go to Eppington, and in about 4. weeks expected to set out for Albemarle. mr Eppes was engaged in his harvest much obstructed by rain, & regretting he had not before deposited Maria at Monticello. I hope...
I recieved yesterday mr Randolph’s letter of the 11th. and at the same time one from mr Eppes . he had just carried Maria to Eppington with the loss of a horse on the road. they are to leave Eppington tomorrow at farthest for Monticello, so that by the time you recieve this they will be with you. from what mr Randolph writes I should think you had better go over at once with your sister to...
I am in hopes, my dear Martha, that I shall hear by the arrival of tomorrow morning’s post, that you are all well. in the mean while the arrangement is such that my letter must go hence this evening. my last letter was from mr Eppes of Oct. 3. when all were well. I inclose a Crazy Jane for Anne, and a sweetheart for Ellen. the latter instead of the many coloured stories which she cannot yet...
Your’s of Nov. 18. by mr Trist has been duly recieved. my business is become so intense that when post day comes, it is often out of my power to spare a moment. the post too, being now on the winter establishment is three days longer in carrying our letters. I am sincerely concerned at the situation of our dear little ones with the whooping cough, but much rejoiced that they have past the...
This is merely, my dear Martha, to say that all is well. it is very long since I have heard from you, my last letter from Edgehill being of the 6th. of Dec. a letter of Jan. 6. from mr Eppes at Richmond informed me that Maria was entirely reestablished in her health, & her breast quite well. the little boy too was well & healthy.—Dr. Gantt has inoculated six of his Cow pox patients with the...
I recieved Anne’s letter by the last post , in which she forgot to mention the health of the family, but I presume it good. I inclose you a medal executed by an artist lately from Europe and who appears to be equal to any in the world. it is taken from Houdon’s bust, for he never saw me. it sells the more readily as the prints which have been offered the public are such miserable caracatures....
Your letter of the 16th. and mr Randolph’s of the 9th. both came to hand by the last post. since that too I have seen S. Carr who tells me you do not mean to include Virginia and Anne in your visit to this place. against this I must remonstrate. every principal respecting them, and every consideration interesting to yourself, mr Randolph or myself, is in favor of their coming here. if Virginia...
I arrived here on Sunday morning (May 30.) to breakfast without having experienced any accident on the road, other than being twice taken in soaking rains: but my water proof coat was a perfect protection. mr and mrs Madison arrived the day after. I find they have not yet got clear of the measles here, so that either at home or here your family will hardly escape it. it is now time for you to...
From Edgehill to Gordon’s 18. miles. A good tavern, but cold victuals on the road will be better than any thing which any of the country taverns will give you. lodge at Gordon’s go to Orange courthouse 10. miles to breakfast. a good tavern. on leaving Orange courthouse be very attentive to the roads, as they begin to be difficult to find. Adams’s mill 7. miles. here you enter the flat country...
I recieved, my dear daughter, your’s of the 13th . by post. I regret extremely the situation of your family, not only for my disappointment here, but for what they are to suffer. I acknolege that, knowing when I came away the measles were in the neighborhood, I saw it was but too possible your visit here would be delayed. as it is, we must agree to the fall visit, and as Maria will be at...
I yesterday recieved letters from mr Eppes & Maria. she has been for a considerable time very unwell, with low but constant fevers, and the child very unwell also. mrs Eppes had gone there and staid with her till she was well enough to be removed to Eppington, where the air & the bark had already produced a favorable effect. she wishes to proceed to Monticello as soon as she is strong enough,...
I arrived here on the fourth day of our journey without accident. travelling early one or two mornings through fog brought on some degree of indisposition, which I felt strongly on the day & day after my arrival, but it is wearing off slowly. it has been chiefly an excessive soreness all over and a deafness & ringing in the head. I have desired mr Jefferson to procure you whatever you may call...
I have been expecting by every post to learn from you when I might send on to meet you. I still expect it daily. in the mean time I inclose you 100. Dol. for the expences of yourself, Maria & all your party. mr Randolph would do well to exchange the bills for gold & silver which will be more readily [. . .] on the road. the indisposition I mentioned in my letter by Bowles turned out to be...
Your letter of the 29th. has relieved me from the great anxiety I had felt on your previous entire silence about your journey. there was no hair inclosed in your letter: but I sent the letter to mrs Madison who has had the order given as you desired, for colours from her own judgment, perhaps those of your own hair. if this should not please, send hair in your Friday’s letter, and within a...
The last post-days have slipt away from me without adverting to them till too late. I learnt by a letter from Maria that you all got home safe, after a very disagreeable journey. indeed I suffered for you in imagination beyond any thing I had long felt. I found the road, in the short distance I went with you, so much worse than I expected, that I augured a dreadful journey, and sincerely...
A promise made to a friend some years ago, but executed only lately, has placed my religious creed on paper. I have thought it just that my family, by possessing this, should be enabled to estimate the libels published against me on this, as on every other possible subject. I have written to Philadelphia for Doctr. Priestley’s history of the corruptions of Christianity, which I will send you,...
So constant, my dear daughter, have been my occupations here since Congress met, that it has never been in my power to write any thing which could admit of delay at all: and our post now passing but once a week, lessens the opportunities, tho the rapidity is increased to 24. hours between this place & Charlottesville. I recieved by mr Randolph the frills & a pair of stockings. it will be...
Our Milton post not having come in last night, we are without news from you. I suppose he has been delayed by the weather, a severe snow storm having begun yesterday morning & still continuing. the snow is supposed to be now a foot deep, and is still falling with unabated fury. as it is the first, so I hope it will be the last of our severe winter weather. it is so tempestuous that I presume...
Your letter of the 2d. my dear Martha, which was not recieved till the last night has raised me to life again. for four days past I had gone through inexpressible anxiety. the mail which left you on the 5th. will probably be here tonight, and will I hope strengthen our hopes of Maria’s continuing to recover, and mr Eppes’s arrival which I presume was on the 6th. will render her spirits...
It is a considerrible time, my very dear Martha, since I have written because I have been in expectation you were all at Eppington: and tho’ I have not heard of your return to Edgehill, I presume it has taken place. I have some hope of being able to leave this on the 23d. & to be with you on the 26th. but it is possible I may not be able to get thro’ my business. mr Gallatin & Smith are gone....
I arrived here this day week, having travelled through the rain of that day rather than stay in disagreeable quarters. I experienced no inconvenience from it. the Marquis Yrujo arrived two days after me, and mr Madison & Genl. Dearborne got here the last night. the latter has left his family in Maine for the winter. Yrujo is said to be very ill, taken two days ago. I inclose a magazine for...
I send you the inclosed magazine supposing it may furnish you a few moments amusement, as well as to the reading members of your family. Mr. Randolph arrived here Sunday evening in good health and brought me the welcome news, that you were all well. Congress has as yet formed but one of it’s houses; there being no Senate. my heart fails me at the opening such a campaign of bustle & fatigue:...
Taking for granted that mr Randolph writes to you regularly and much engaged by business & company myself, I have been more remiss. we are all well here, and our accounts from Eppington are favorable, & particularly that our dear little one there has two teeth. Francis is in remarkeable health: and I hope the objects of our affections with you are equally so. I send you some magazines which...
A letter from mr Randolph to mr Coles informs him he shall bring you here, but does not say if with or without the family; I shall rejoice my dear to receive you here, and them, or as many of them that you can bring. I feel much for what you will suffer on the road for such a spell of severe weather we have not known for years. the thermometer has been down of mornings at 14. 12. 10. and once...
Your letter of the 11th. was recieved and gave me the first intimation of your illness. it has filled me with anxiety respecting you, and this is increased by your not having communicated it to me. because in endeavoring to spare my feelings on your real situation it gives me the pain of fearing every thing imaginable; even that the statement of your recovery may not be exact. let me pray you...
Your letter of the 11th. recieved here on the 15th. is the last news I have of you. mr Randolph having written to mr Coles that he should be here on the 15th. & not having come, & no letter from you by that post, I was thrown into inexpressible anxiety lest a relapse into your complaint should have called him to Edgehill. from this I was not relieved till three days ago when a letter from mr...
Your letter of Apr. 19. & mr Randolph’s of Apr. 27. have given me the agreeable information of mr Randolph’s success, & the more agreeable & important information that you are getting well. for the restoration of your stomach my chief dependance is on your own resolution to observe rigorously whatever regimen you find from experience to agree with you: and it will take a long course of this...
I have been a month now without hearing from Edgehill, mr Randolph’s letter of May 11. being the last I have recieved. Anne then had the mumps which of course were expected to go thro’ the family, and heightens my anxiety to hear from you. our post is now I believe permanently established at three times a week. the spring here continues sickly & cold, & poor prospects of crops. we had...
I have barely time to tell you that mrs Madison has executed your desires and I dare say to your mind. the commission to me has given me the greatest pleasure, as it always would that you would say to me freely at all times what want you have which I could gratify. my wishes are always to do what would be pleasing to you; but knowing nothing of what would be proper or acceptable, I do nothing....
I last night recieved a letter from mr Taylor of Baltimore informing me he had sent by the stage to this place the trunk of articles ordered by mr Kelly. I sent this morning to the Stage office; the trunk was arrived, & goes on this evening to Fredericksburg, where I shall desire mr Benson to forward it by the first stage to Milton. I had paiment made here for transportation as far as...
I performed my journey to this place without any accident or disagreeable circumstance except travelling half a day in a pretty steady rain, which I thought preferable to staying at Brown’s. I experienced no inconvenience from it. this place, which had been healthy thro’ the summer is now rather sickly. some cold mornings & frost after my arrival, it was hoped would remove all disease, but the...
I have been from home now three weeks without having heard from you or of you through any channel. this being our stage postday I had hoped for a line from some of the family. knowing the uncertain state of your health this long silence makes me uneasy. I hope I shall soon be relieved by a letter. your rooms will be in readiness for you here by the beginning of the month. mrs Madison still...
Immediately on the reciept of your last letter, as mrs Madison was and is still in Philadelphia, I wrote to her for the articles you desired, and they may be expected by the stage probably in a few days. I now inclose you an hundred dollars for your expences on the road, and you must consider every thing which yourself or the family will want here as to be furnished by me so that the visit may...
I was uneasy at not hearing from you by the last post, that is to say, by the one which arrived Tuesday morning last, the 19th. I thought it certain I should recieve information as to sending a carriage. I take for granted I shall have a letter tomorrow morning; but in the mean time this goes out this evening. we find more difficulty than I had expected in getting a carriage. it seems that all...
The carriage goes off in the morning for Centerville, in time, if you should arrive there early & be so disposed, to bring you on to Fairfax court house in the evening. that will make your ride the next morning easy. but should you not leave Centerville till Sunday morning, you may with ease get here to dinner which we shall accordingly keep back for you till 4. aclock. if you could start by...
I arrived here, my dear Martha, to breakfast, on the Saturday morning before the last, without accident, & without wetting from the various showers which fell. mr Eppes proceded to Annapolis the next day (Sunday) and was back on Tuesday, all that matter being entirely broken off. I understand it was from the disagreement of the mother, solely, who has some other match for her daughter in her...
The last letter I have had from Edgehill was Anne’s of June 20. that informed me that the family had been generally unwell, that Ellen was still ill, and your self too sick to write. I am very anxious to hear from you & hope that this day’s post will inform me you are all well. this day fortnight I propose to leave this place and to be with you Thursday morning the 24th. absence from you...
John delivered safely your letter of the 14th. I am sorry you did not continue at Monticello until your house was in compleat readiness for you. you will run the double risk of green plaister, & a less perfect preparation of it for your winter’s residence. I do not know what stores remained for your consumption, but it is always my wish you should take whatever does remain. many of them will...
Davy arrived last night and will set out tomorrow on his return. by him I send the flower-pot & plant in it which you left here, & a box No. 5. containing a bonnet for yourself. he carries also a cage with a pair of Bantams for Ellen. I must ask the favor of you to have the box No. 4. opened, to take out a piece of linen, & then let the box go on to Monticello. the linen I must ask you to have...
Tomorrow Congress will close; but I hardly expect to get away under a week. it will take that time at least to get all the laws put into a course of execution & some other matters settled. on Monday last mr Randolph & myself took a ride to Maine’s to engage our thorns. the day was raw, he was without a great coat, and was before indisposed, as I had mentioned to you. that evening he was taken...
I wrote you on Monday evening, and then expected that a morning or two more would have produced a compleat intermission of mr Randolph’s fever. but it did not. yesterday morning the remission was such as to leave the fever scarcely sensible, and at 3. P.M. the usual hour of it’s access it was more moderate than it has ever been. I left him at 4. P.M. with not much fever, entirely at ease and...
I have the happiness to inform you that mr Randolph is entirely well. his fever had left him at the date of my last but I did not then know it. + he moved here on Saturday and Dr. Jones with him. He has now nothing but weakness to contend with. he was able to walk two or three times across the room to-day, he eats with some appetite & sleeps tolerably. the Doctor will leave us tomorrow, as...
Altho’ I wrote to you by post yesterday, yet as an opportunity offers by Capt Clarke at noon to-day, and I know you will still be anxious, I write again to assure you that mr Randolph continues perfectly well. he slept finely last night, eats with appetite to-day, is in fine spirits, and has nothing amiss but weakness. the first sun-shiney day he will begin to take air & exercise in the...
Altho’ this letter which goes by the carts, will not reach you till Monday evening, and that which I shall write you by the post of tomorrow evening will reach you on Monday morning, yet I cannot omit to drop you a line lest any accident should delay that by mail. mr Randolph continues well. eats with appetite sleeps tolerably, reads: and has not had the smallest return of fever since it left...
I wrote to you by the carts yesterday morning; but as you will not get that letter till Monday evening, and may recieve this written a day later on Monday morning, I again inform you that mr Randolph continues well. he rode yesterday 5. miles, without fatigue, was much exhilarated by it, & had a fine night’s sleep. an Easterly storm having set in this morning will interrupt this salutary...
Mr Randolph continues well. nothing has happened to throw him back. he rides out now on good days in the carriage. he came down to breakfast with us to-day. but the quantity of blood taken from him occasions him to recover strength slowly. it is now certain that his calculation for departure will be truer than mine. judging by the advance of his strength for the last week, it will take another...
Mr. Randolph continues well without the least retrograde circumstance. he sleeps well, walks a good deal about the house, rides out in the carriage every day this cruel weather will permit & breakfasts & dines with us. but his strength returns so slowly that he certainly will not be able to undertake his journey on Monday as we had hoped. indeed I do not think a time can be fixed. when he...
Mr. Randolph’s convalescence proceeds steadily, not a single circumstance having arisen to throw him back. yet his strength increases slowly. as yet he only rides out in the carriage every day. it will not be till he can get on horseback that we can judge when he will be able to travel. my fits of head-ach have shortened from 9 hours to 5. but they have stuck some days at 5. hours, and when...
I presume mr Randolph writes to you and informs you he continues well. he has rode twice on horseback; yesterday about 4. miles without feeling it. my fit of yesterday was so mild that I have some hope of missing it to-day. I write this in the morning, but will keep it open till the evening to add the result of the day. we both think we may very safely fix on Monday sennight for our departure,...