You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Munroe, Thomas
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 1

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Munroe, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-40 of 40 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
As the work you mention will cost as is supposed not more than 50. D. & is so necessary for the preservation of the wall, I think it may be so far considered as appurtenant to the wall & necessary to it’s duration, that it may be placed to that account. DLC : District of Columbia Papers.
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Monroe, & on a view of the expences incurred & engaged for the Pensylvania avenue, that the funds will admit only to gravel it where it is wanting and as much only as is necessary to make it firm. the planting with oaks &c. & additional arch to the bridge must be abandoned. DLC : District of Columbia Papers.
The representations I have recieved satisfy me that mr Lenthall ought to be allowed 4. Dollars a day from the beginning. be so good therefore as to settle with him accordingly, or if a settlement has been made, to correct it in conformity herewith. Accept my salutations & assurances of esteem P.S. I have desired that nothing may be forwarded to me here from the Post–office after the 5th. ViU .
If you will be so good as to make particular & diligent enquiry as to the riotous workmen, and to designate those who were active and insolent on the late occasion, & therefore most proper to be excluded from the public yards, I shall be willing that the residue be recieved again. it will be necessary that you report the list to me that I may communicate it to the other public works. friendly...
I have this day made a tolerably exact estimate of the digging already done at the President’s house, & that which remains to be done, for the lead drains from each end of the house, and the main sewer. there is done 1000. cub. yards. digging at 18 C = 180.D carrying away @ C = D
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Munro and informs him that mr Latrobe’s salary from the date of his removal to this place is to be 2000. D. that is to say to be increased 300. D. which last sum of 300. D. being stated as necessary to his removal, mr Munroe is hereby authorised to advance to him at this time on account. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Th: Jefferson incloses to mr Monroe a resolution of the H. of Representatives & prays him, with as little delay as he can to make the statement required as to the articles within his department, to wit, the Capitol, President’s house, public offices, and other objects of public expence within the city of Washington under mr Monroe’s care, he will percieve that it goes back to the origin of the...
I return you the inclosed proclamation, & to avoid an innovation which might produce uneasiness, I believe it will be best to continue it in it’s usual form. With respect to inclosures, so long as the former proprietors keep up an inclosure, & the streets in it are not pressingly wanted for the public, we will permit them to remain, but whenever the owner has once taken away his inclosure, we...
While Th: Jefferson regrets the cause which obliges mr Munroe to be absent from this place, it is too imperative a one to admit of objection. as Th:J. will be absent himself shortly, he wishes, before mr Munroe’s departure to give orders for whatever monies may be wanting from the different funds for July, Aug. & Sep. dating them monthly. on this subject, a previous conversation might perhaps...
Th: Jefferson, with his compliments to mr. Munroe, incloses him a letter to John Davidson for his perusal & to be forwarded, retaining a copy with the original now inclosed, for the use of his office. DLC : District of Columbia Papers.
Th: J. presents his compliments to mr Munroe; he is so much engaged as to be unable to read the inclosed with attention, but has no doubt it is sufficient to obtain the injunction on; & should it need any thing material afterwards, it can be amended. DLC : District of Columbia Papers.
Th: Jefferson with his compliments to mr Munro, sends him the inclosed copy of a letter to mr Latrobe, that he may be informed of the plan of proceeding on the public buildings for this summer DLC : District of Columbia Papers.
Th: Jefferson presents his salutations to mr Munroe, and is of opinion there can be no doubt of Majr. L’Enfant’s title to interest. it was validly engaged by the commissioners, and their offer has been approved by the legislature. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Munroe, and asks the favor of him to turn to the letter of Th:J. of April 3d. 1805 from Monticello, where he will find that mr Lenthall’s allowance Was to be 4. D. a day from the beginning of his employment. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Munroe. he has this moment seen a wooden house building in F. street near mr Hoben’s which seems indubitably beyond the limits allowed. he prays him to have it examined, & if found unlawful, to have injunctions instantly served on all liable to them. DLC : District of Columbia Papers.
It being perfectly understood that the appropriation of Mar. 3. 1803. for ‘keeping in repair the highway between the capitol & other public buildings’ had in view only ordinary & light repairs in the stile which then existed, it would be contrary to that view to make it the foundation of expending on them such a sum as 5. or 6000.D. altho’ it is very possible that this would be cheapest in the...
I inclose you mr Latrobe’s account for the glass I purchased at the Capitol & President’s house. he has charged it at what it cost the public, 10. cents the square foot. but on the back I have calculated it at 12 ½ cents, for which he says I might have bought it, by the box, from the merchants. the amount at this last price is 150 7/100 D for which I inclose you a check on the bank US. will...
You will percieve by the inclosed letter from the Governor of Maryland that we are called on for the arrears of interest on the two loans of two hundred thousand and of fifty thousand dollars, the former guarantied by Congress, and the latter assumed by them in a specified mode. knowing that the city funds are not in cash to answer these demands, and that your office is constantly open for the...
Having consulted the Secretary of the Treasury on the letter from mr Harwood to yourself respecting the Maryland debt, you are desired to inform mr Harwood that we consider ourselves as authorised by the act of Congress to pay the 1st. instalment of 40 M dollars on any day in the year 1804. the 2d. on any day in the year 1805 etc. that consequently the first will be paid on demand, & as it is...
The Case of the sale of city lots under a decree of the Chancellor of Maryland. The deed of the original owners of the scite of the city of Washington to certain trustees, after making provisions for streets, public squares &c declares that the residue of the ground laid off in building lots shall one moiety belong to the original proprietors, and the other moiety shall be sold on such terms &...
Your letter of the 14th. was recieved on the 18th. and this goes by the return of the first post, that which brought it not affording time for an answer. No. 2. in the draught mr King was so kind as to send me is exactly what Dr. Thornton explained to me as the original design except that he did not mention the two middle rows of trees, but only the two outer ones on each side: and, omitting...
I now inclose you a warrant for 10,000 D. the post coming twice a week will enable you to apply whenever money is wanting, by letter to me, only taking care to write a week before it is wanting. if the difficulties arising in the law suits of the city can be got over till the Attorney general & myself return to the city, they shall be the subject of consultation to see what can be done. the...
The inclosed letter to mr Mason, & that from mr Stoddert will explain themselves. be so good as to peruse & deliver them to mr Mason, and consult with him on their contents. whatever he and you think may be lawfully done, which may be an indulgence to mr Stoddert and not injure the public, I would wish you to do without delaying to consult me. Accept my best wishes & respects. PrC ( DLC ); at...
The letter from the committee of subscribers to the theatre which I recieved from you on the 18th. Ult. has been the subject of enquiry & consideration since my return to this place. the theatre is proposed to be built by private individuals, it is to be their private property, for their own emolument, & may be conveyed to any other private individual. to cede to them public grounds for such a...
In applying the fund of 3000. D. to the highways appurtenant to the public buildings we must take care, not only not to exceed them, but to apply them, as far as they will go, to those objects most important, leaving undone what we can best do without. I think therefore the following course of operation will be safest. 1st. Operation. replant all the trees which are wanting & secure them. make...
Your’s of the 13th. is this moment recieved, informing me of the vacancy in the office of Surveyor of the city, by the departure of the late Surveyor, & of the necessity of an immediate appointment. according therefore to what had been proposed, on that event’s taking place, I presume it is proper to appoint mr Nicholas King to that place. I believe this appointment was heretofore made by the...
Th: Jefferson presents his salutations to mr Munroe: he does not recollect whether any act of Congress authorises the paiment of the instalments to Maryland, & he has not had an opportunity of consulting mr Gallatin. under this state of uncertainty it would be improper to say any thing to mr Harwood which should be any thing like a promise or assurance on the part of the Executive. he thinks...
Your favor of the 31st. came by the last post, and conveyed the first information I had recieved since I left Washington of the progress in the public buildings. I see with extreme concern that we shall not accomplish what was hoped. as nothing is mentioned of the covering of sheet iron being put on either building, I fear it is not done. I am now putting such a cover on my own house, &...
I do not know whether it is the practice here to issue a subpoena of injunction without a bill filed. if it is, it would be best to take out one immediately against the master Carpenter & the owner or employer. if it is not the custom, then the case should be stated by letter immediately by post to the Atty. of the District, & a bill derived from him without delay. the evasion of putting 2....
Yours of the 13th. was recieved last night, and really presents a painful state of things. However our object now can be only how to meet the new deficit, with the least injustice. Your statement is as follows— Debts paid by mr Monroe 28,107. 74 by mr Claxton 5,403. 76
On further enquiry & consideration I find it will be better to employ what is called here foundation stone, rather than brick: consequently that little brick will be wanting. your advertisement therefore may be that there will be wanting large quantities of freestone, foundation stone & lime, and some brick. be so good as to mention this to mr Latrobe should he come. Accept my best wishes &...
Your favor of the 17th is recieved. I think that while there is a prospect of getting better prices by postponing the sale of the lots, the public interest requires they should be postponed. to what time I leave to your own judgment, observing only that the law has fixed a limit beyond which we cannot postpone. With respect to the paiment of your note to the Columbia bank I am in hopes no...
Relying on your attention to the state of the appropriations for the public buildings, of which it is impossible for me to keep an account, I have always counted on recieving admonitions from you when they began to be low. that seems by your letter of the 8th. to be so much the case with the funds for the North wing & President’s house, that it is necessary immediately to stop all work at the...
Th: Jefferson incloses to mr Monroe mr Duval’s opinion on the sale of the city lots under the decree in Chancery. considering that there are three parties in this case, 1. the Debtor 2. the US. as privileged creditor, 3. the residuary creditors, the only chance to avoid sacrificing all three of the parties is to obtain the consent of all three to have the sales opened and adjourned from time...
The inclosed letter from Doctr. Thornton informs me that mr Mason & yourself had concluded that it would be no injury to the public to postpone for a time the sale of mr Stoddert’s lots , and that you had postponed it till the 25th. of Oct. and he asks the same indulgence for himself. the same reason pleading for this as in the other case, I think it right that the same indulgence should be...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Munroe. he recieved some time ago a parcel of sheet iron from mr Latrobe but, without knowing exactly how much, he had supposed it double the quantity stated in the papers furnished by mr Munroe. at least he thinks he ordered double the quantity. nevertheless presuming this to be what was furnished him, & which was ordered on his private account, he...
Your’s of July 31st. is recieved, and I am sorry to learn that our funds call for a contraction of our works. in this case everything unessential in other parts must be given up to finish the Capitol, which is the main object. I will give you my thoughts on the several parts of the works, and leave to yourself on consultation with mr Lenthall & mr Blagden to modify them according to existing...
In answer to your letter covering mr Davidson’s on the subject of the claim he sets up to certain grounds near the President’s house, I did recieve an early application from him on the subject as he states, but it was very long before I got all the materials which were necessary to enable me to make up a satisfactory judgment on that & the many other questions respecting the city which had...
I inclose you the Attorney general’s opinion on so much of the act concerning the city of Washington as relates to the monies allowed to it’s officers. you will percieve that he thinks the appropriation for yourself the only one limited to a particular period of time, viz from July 1. 1802. to Dec. 31. 1803 that the time for which the other appropriations are made is undefined, and the monies...
I have delayed some days answering your favor of the 24th. instant on the subject of Mr Nicholas King’s appointment to be Surveyor of the City, because possessing no papers nor means of information on the subject here, and not having it in my memory, I feel some difficulty. I have some idea that that officer has not been heretofore salaried, but has depended on perquisites paid by those who...