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I had written the inclosed letter to mrs Trist, and was just proceeding to begin one to you, when your favor of the 6th . was put into my hand. I thank you sincerely for it, and consider the views of it so sound, that I have communicated it to my coadjutors as one of our important evidences of the public sentiment, according to which we must shape our course. I suspect, partly from this, but...
Mr. Camp handed me yesterday your two favors of the 11 & 12 of March. I can say nothing determinate as to the prospect of him & Mr. Lambert, because I do not yet know what arrangements may be contemplated throughout the Departments. I think however it would be unwise in any of the Candidates to neglect other resources; the number of them being such as greatly to reduce the chance to...
I am late in answering your favor of the 4th. because the Navy department, from an extraordinary press of business, could not till within this day or two furnish me the inclosed papers . you will see by them that the money for Gosport (12,000. D.) has been placed in Norfolk at mr Hopkins’s command, ever since the last week in January. why it should have been witheld so long he will probably...
In mine of the 22d. I forgot to write on the subject of Callender , tho’ I had reserved that, for some time, to make a part of the letter. D.M.R. has contrived to put the money in such a situation that I find we could not lay our hands on it without giving room for specious criticisms. that would be a gratification to which he is not entitled. it will moreover strengthen the reasons for laying...
Since mine of the 26th. Callender is arrived here. he did not call on me; but understanding he was in distress, I sent Capt Lewis to him with 50. D. to inform him we were making some enquiries as to his fine which would take a little time, & lest he suffer in the mean time I had sent him &c. his language to Capt Lewis was very high toned. he intimated that he was in possession of things which...
I have duly recieved your letter of the 22d. instant, covering a copy of your communication to the General assembly, with the documents relative to the conduct of the British Consul at Norfolk who is charged with having recieved and sent out of the state of Virginia, a citizen of that state, under circumstances unauthorised by the existing laws. be assured that the request conveyed in the same...
I have recd. your favor of the 23 Ult. Callendar made his appearance here some days ago in the same temper which is described in your letter. He seems implacable towards the principal object of his complaints and not to be satisfied in any respect, without an office. It has been my lot to bear the burden of receiving & repelling his claims. What feelings may have been excited by my plain...
Your favor of the 16th. came to hand yesterday, & by this day’s post I inclose you a draught on Gibson & Jefferson for 50. D. payable to Majr. Wm. Duval to whom you will be so good as to explain that it is for Genl. Lawson . I now write an answer to the Genl. but will keep it back a couple of days as it furnishes me in that way an excuse for having previously placed the money in Duval’s hands....
In answer to your letter on the paiment of the guards at New-London, I beg leave to mention that it was not till about a fortnight ago that measures could be taken for their relief. a party from some recruits at Winchester was about that time ordered to proceed to New London. so soon as they arrive, the guards you ordered can be dispensed with, and if you will then have the accounts of...
The inclosed came last evening in a packet from Bourdeau. By the same conveyance I have a letter from Dawson of May 27. at Paris. Every appearance assured him that the convention would be ratified. Letters from King of May 30. & June 1 represent the British Govt. as in dispositions equally favorable. They have given peremptory orders to their W. Inda. cruisers to abstain from the Captures...
I have your two favors of the 11 & 15. instant. The letter inclosed in the first is returned, Mr. Livingston having sailed before it could reach N. Y. and the letter for which it was to be substituted, having before gone on to him. The letter inclosed in the latter is also inclosed, with a note at the bottom of it by the President which will serve for an answer. We think the best mode of...
General Mason has just requested me to forward the inclosed 100 dolrs. to be put into the hands of Mr. S. Pleasants for Mr. Callander. Yrs. affy. RC ( NhHi ). Virginia senator Stevens Thomson Mason was an active supporter of Callender’s cause (see Michael Durey, “ With the Hammer of Truth ”: James Thomson Callender and America’s Early National Heroes [Charlottesville, Va., 1990], pp. 110–11,...
The Bearer Mr. Eli Whitney has been introduced to me by a letter from Mr. Pierpont Edwards, as an eminent Mathematical & Mechanical genius, and otherwise highly respectable. Of his Mechanical ingenuity he has given a valuable specimen in his invention of a machine for separating Cotton from its seed. He will probably converse with you on the subject of making fire arms, in which he is also an...
The bearer hereof is mr Whitney of Connecticut a mechanic of the first order of ingenuity, who invented the Cotton gin now so much used to the South; he is at the head of a considerable gun manufactory in Connecticut, and furnishes the US. with muskets, undoubtedly the best they recieve. he has invented moulds & machines for making all the peices of his locks so exactly equal, that take 100...
The inclosed is the result of consideration & consultation between mr Madison & myself. if there be any thing you may think could be changed for the better, send it back , & it shall be altered. I congratulate you on the certain event of peace, whatever it’s conditions may be. health & happiness cum ceteris votis . RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers); addressed: “James Monroe Governor of Virginia...
I had not been unmindful of your letter of June 15, covering a resolution of the House of Representatives of Virginia, and referred to in your’s of the 17th. inst. the importance of the subject, and the belief that it gave us time for consideration till the next meeting of the legislature have induced me to defer the answer to this date. you will percieve that some circumstances, connected...
I recieved last night your favor of the 8th. and I readily embrace both ideas of amendment suggested by you. I will pray you therefore in the last page of the letter, lines 9. & 10. to strike out the words ‘him, and executed with the aid of the Federal executive? these’ and insert ‘them. they’ or rather turn ‘him’ into ‘them’ by prefixing a t, and putting a loop to the i, thus e. and turn...
I beg leave to inclose you a complaint transmitted to this Department by the Agent of the U. States at Jamaica, of certain frauds in the case of flour shipped to that Island. As the facts stated have reference to places within the State of Virginia, it is thought most proper to communicate them to you, who will be best able to decide on the manner & measure of enquiry due to the subject. With...
I have not yet thanked you for the copy of your Message, which I find has attracted attention, and circulates with advantage to yourself, as well as to the public. It is much to be wished that the same manly and enlarged sentiments, and the same just and enlightened policy, might distinguish the addresses of all the Republican Governors, and co-operate with the example set by the President, in...
I have this moment recd yours of the 14th. instant. The letter from Mr. Purviance which I herein return is a favorable specimen of his stile & sentiments. Mr. Jones will explain to you the occasion & object of my enquiries. I have as yet formed no final determination in the case, & there is a possibility tho not a probability that it may be rendered unnecessary. Mr. Dawson as you will see has...
31 January 1802, Washington. Introduces Prince Ruspoli, who has been recommended by Mr. King and through him by Mr. West. Ruspoli “proposes to make an excursion from Richmond, by the way of Monticello, to the Natural bridge; & returning thence, to proceed thro’ Norfolk to Charl[e]stown by water.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Incomplete. Docketed by Monroe.
Will you be so good as to deliver the inclosed letters to Prince Ruspoli , to whom I should have sent them before he left this place, but was prevented by indispensable occupations. as I know he is to call on you, the omission can be supplied; the object of the letters being to have him attended to at Monticello. should he be gone, or not go that rout, let them be sent to Monticello, as they...
In a letter from Dupont de Nemours to me is the following passage. ‘Houdon a laissé en Amerique un trés beau buste de Benjamin Franklin, lequel est actuellement chez moi. ce buste en marbre vaut cent louis de notre monnaie, environ 480. D. rien n’est plus convenable a la nation que de la placer dans votre Capitole &c. et Houdon, a qui la Virginie doit encore mille ecus sur la statue de...
I now return the letters to you from Mr. Purviance & Cambaceres, with an acknowledgment of those in which they were inclosed. The papers last recd. from you in relation to Mr. Skipwith will be of use in establishing one or two material points. His case has been a hard one, but it may be questioned whether he be well founded in the extent of his claims for interest & Agency for Claims. The...
Your’s of the 21st. is duly recieved. Chisolm is now engaged in running up for me 20. brick pilasters to my offices, which take about 4000. bricks, and I remember it was very doubtful whether we had that number. but if there be as many over it as you need, they are at your service, and I will give orders accordingly by the next post. I expect to be there myself within 10. days after the rising...
I arrived here yesterday & shall stay here a fortnight only. on my return to Washington I shall have to appoint Commissioners of bankruptcy for the several states. in this I propose to appoint 4. for Richmond & Manchester, and 4. for Norfolk. do you think those of Richmond could serve for Petersburg, or had I better appoint 4. there also. I wish 2. to be lawyers & 2. merchants, tho they might...
I observe that the resolution of the legislature of Virginia , of Jan. 23. in desiring us to look out for some proper place to which insurgent negroes may be sent, expresses a preference of the continent of Africa, or some of the Spanish or Portuguese settlements in S. America: in which preference, & especially as to the former I entirely concur. on looking towards Africa for our object, the...
We are waiting for your recommendation of Commissioners of bankruptcy for Norfolk. Moses Myers & Richd. Evers Lee have been proposed by some. mr Arthur Lee has been thought of. say frankly if any of them are proper or improper. Littleton W. Tazewell if he would accept would make an excellent one: but I believe he lives in or near Williamsburg.—I propose to be at Monticello during Aug. and...
Your favor of the 7th. has been duly recieved. I am really mortified at the base ingratitude of Callender. it presents human nature in a hideous form: it gives me concern because I percieve that relief, which was afforded him on mere motives of charity, may be viewed under the aspect of employing him as a writer. When the Political progress of Britain first appeared in this country, it was in...
After writing you on the 15th. I turned to my letter file to see what letters I had written to Callender & found them to have been of the dates of 1798. Oct. 11. & 1799. Sep. 6. & Oct. 6. but on looking for the letters they were not in their places nor to be found. on recollection I believe I sent them to you a year or two ago. if you have them, I shall be glad to recieve them at Monticello...