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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 9551-9600 of 9,605 sorted by editorial placement
I recieved yesterday only yours of Apr. 27. with the letters of Armstrong, Turreau, Hull, Depeyster, Lee and the resolutions of Nelson county, all of which are now returned, with the pamphlet of the author of War in disguise, and a letter of Genl. Wilkinson’s for circulation & to remain with the Attorney Genl.   I recieved no letter from mr Gallatin on the subject of Turreau’s application for...
I return you Monroe’s letter of Mar. 5. as the explosion in the British ministry took place about the 15th. I hope we shall be spared the additional embarrasment of his convention. I inclose you a letter of Michl. Jones for circulation & to rest with the Atty Genl. it contains new instances of Burr’s enlistments. I recieved this from mr Gallatin, so you can hand it to Genl. Dearborn...
I arrived here yesterday after a passage of eighteen days from New Orleans. I came in the same vessel with Genl Wilkinson who has brought round with him, some eight or nine of Burrs men under an expectation that they will be important Witnesses. Some of them will probably tell all they know, but I fear this will not be the case with those who know most. The General has chartered a Pilot Boat...
On my arrival here, I found that the District Attorney was at Princeton, & I determined, if Burr had not left the city to apply immediately for a warrant against him for treason, so as to secure & have him put on in custody to Richmond for trial, unless some good natured judge released him upon Hab. Corpus. He has been obliged in order to elude the Sheriff’s officers who had, I am informed...
Commissions are desired for the following persons. Alexander Moore of Columbia as Register of wills for the county of Alexandria. Thomas H. Williams of Misipi Territory as Secretary of the sd territory. Jacob Descamps of Virginia as Surveyor of the port of Charlestown in the district of Misipi Joseph Buell of Ohio as Surveyor of the port of Marietta in the district of Misipi James W. Moss of...
An occurrence took place yesterday off our Capes (between Six & Ten miles) which I hold it my duty to make known to the Government. The Chesapeake Sailed from Hampton Roads yesterday for her destination; at the distance before mentioned, she was boarded by an Officer from the British Ship Leopard rated at fifty guns, and a demand made of certain Seamen. Captain Barron refused to deliver up any...
These papers from Governor Cabell are inclosed for your perusal: I am about to answer the Governor’s letter but whether I shall be able in time for this day’s post, I do not know. if not, I will send you his letter & my answer by tomorrow’s post, with which answer I will pray you to send him the papers now inclosed, returning to me his letter Will you be so good as to direct a commission to be...
I have finished my letter alluded to in the cover of Govr. Cabell’s papers, and no post is yet arrived. it therefore goes with those papers. be so good as to examine it deliberately, and make in it any corrections it may need, noting them to be that I may make correspondent changes in the copy retained. if the corrections do not deface the letter, seal and send it on returning me the Gov’s...
Yours of yesterday was recieved in the course of the day. our post-rider has not yet got to be punctual, arriving here from 2. to 4. hours later than he should do, that is to say from 3. to 5. aclock instead of 1. I mean to propose to him that being rigorously punctual in his arrival, I will always discharge him the moment he arrives instead of keeping him till 7. aclock as the Postmaster...
I pray you to peruse & consider the inclosed letter of Governor Cabell and my answer, and to exercise over the latter the same discretion I have confided to Genl. Dearborne, returning it to me for any material correction, or forwarding it to the General if you think it will do, and by the same post, as it goes so circuitously. I suspect your difficulty with the mail lock proceeded as it did at...
I recieved yesterday your two letters without date on the subjects now to be answered. I do not see any objection to the appointment of mr Cocke as Agent at Martinique. that of a Consul at Mogadore is on more difficult ground. a Consul in Barbary is a diplomatic character, altho’ the title does not imply that. he recieves a salary fixed by the legislature; being independant of Simpson we...
I return you the papers recieved yesterday. mr Erskine complains of a want of communication between the British armed vessels in the Chesapeake or off the coast. if by off the coast he means those which being generally in our waters, go occasionally out of them to cruise or to acquire a title to communicate with their Consul it is too poor an evasion for him to expect us to be the dupes of. if...
I suppose mr Gamble should be told that his opinion in favor of the appointment of a Consul General for the Danish islands being founded on the supposition of a war with England, the Executive cannot at present act on that ground. it would seem indeed that in the event of war, our agent or agents in those islands would be very important persons, & should therefore be chosen with care. I...
Your letter to Dayton I think perfectly right, unless perhaps the expression of personal sympathy in the 1st. page might be misconstrued, & coupled with the circumstance that we had not yet instituted a prosecution against him, altho’ possessed of evidence. poor Yznardi seems to have been worked up into distraction by the persecutions of Meade. I inclose you a letter I have recieved from him....
I presume the two commissions of militia officers in the District of Columbia which you inclosed yesterday, were meant as resignations. I have sent them as such to the War office. I was misinformed as to the name of the person appointed Secretary of Orleans. altho always called Bolling Robertson it seems his name is Thomas Bolling Robertson. will you be so good as to order a new commission, &...
Yours without date was recieved yesterday. about 3. or 4. days ago mr Nelson called on me with a letter from Genl. Lee informing me he was summoned in the case which is the subject of your letter, & expressing his difficulties. I had never had any information of the case, it’s parties or subject, except that I had read in the newspapers some time ago that a prosecution was commenced in...
Colo. Newton’s enquiries are easily solved I think by application of the principles we have assumed. 1. the interdicted ships are enemies . should they be forced by stress of weather to run up into safer harbors, we are to act towards them as we would towards enemies in regular war in a like case. permit no intercourse, no supplies, & if they land kill or capture them as enemies. if they lie...
There can be no doubt that Foronda’s claim for the money advanced to Lt. Pike should be repaid; & while his application to yourself is the proper one, we must attend to the money’s being drawn from the proper fund, which is that of the war department. I presume therefore it will be necessary for you to apply to Genl. Dearborne to furnish the money. will it not be proper to rebut Foronda’s...
I think with you we had better send to Algiers some of the losing articles in order to secure peace there while it is uncertain elsewhere. while war with England is probable every thing leading to it with any other nation should be avoided, except with Spain. as to her, I think it the precise moment when we should declare to the French government that we will instantly seise on the Floridas as...
The extract of a letter to Bishop Carroll I have inclosed to Genl. Dearborne. I return you judge Davies’s letter. if we meddle in the case at all, should it not be by sending the letter to the Attorney General who will know best how to prevent a conflict of jurisdictions. I inclose you the copy of a letter from Genl. Smith to mr Gallatin, communicated by the Generel to P. Carr & by him to me....
Mr. Smith’s letter of Aug. 29. & the papers it inclosed, and which are now reinclosed, will explain to you the necessity of my confirming his proposition as to the means of apprising our East India commerce of their danger, without waiting for further opinions on the subject. you will see that it throws on you the immediate burthen of giving the necessary instructions with as little delay as...
After writing to mr Smith my letter of yesterday by the post of the day, I recieved one from him now inclosed, and covering a letter from mr Crownenshield on the subject of notifying our E. India trade. to this I have written the answer herein, which I have left open for your perusal with Crownenshield’s letter, praying you will seal & forward them immediately with any considerations of your...
I returned here yesterday afternoon & found, as I might expect an immense mass of business. with the papers recieved from you I inclose you some others which will need no explanation. I am desired by the Secy. of the navy to say what must be the conduct of Com. Rogers at New–York on the late or any similar entry of that harbor by British armed vessels. I refer him to the orders to Decatur as...
I return all the papers recieved in yours of the 18. & 19th. except one solliciting office, & judge Woodward’s letters, to be communicated to the Secretary at War. should not Claiborne be instructed to say at once to Govr. Folch that as we never did prohibit any articles (except slaves) from being carried up the Misipi to Baton rouge, so we do not mean to prohibit them, & that we only ask a...
I return you the papers which accompanied yours of yesterday. I think the case of Capt Hewes is merely a case for a demand of indemnification from Gr. Br. and a proper acknolegement of the violation of jurisdiction. it would be a very dangerous precedent for Congress to indemnify the individual.   I think it would be well for Smith to be furnished with the declaration of mr Canning only taking...
Health & weather permitting I shall set out on Wednesday without fail. if I can get off early enough I will be with you by half after three, supposed your dining hour. but knowing how difficult it is to clear out from home at any given hour, if I find I cannot be with you at half past three I shall dine at Gordon’s & beg not to be waited for. recieve for yourself & mrs Madison my affectionate...
I send you a letter from the Ex-basha of Tripoli. had we not better be done with this man by giving him a plain answer stating the truth & sending him the extracts from our instructions, by which he will see that if our agent engaged any thing beyond that he went beyond his powers, and could not bind us. nothing short of this can clear us of his sollicitations. we might go further and promise...
Your’s of Oct. 7. was recieved on the 11th. and remains as you desired, within my own breast. I had a considerable time before proposed the place to Colo. L. Smith, & recieved his acceptance by the same post which brought your letter. I acknolege at the same time that I should have had some qualms of conscience excited by my attachment to the college on one side, & to yourself on the other.—we...
I return you the papers on Clarke’s claim, which indeed I have not considered with all the attention which should be done were this an ultimate decision but my first impression is that the claim ought to be rejected. It is clearly a claim for money, not for land. The Commrs. of N.Y. were constituted a special court of justice to distribute the 30,000. D. of Vermont according to right, & they...
The inclosed act of Michigan, tho’ dated Jan. 30. 07. did not get here till the last Congress had risen. it seems merely occasional, & the occasion passed over. I think therefore it is not worth communicating singly to Congress. perhaps they will send their collection to be communicated, which will embrace this. in the mean time this may be filed in your office. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
The preceding address is now transmitted thro’ you to the president of the United States in consequence of the following resolution carried at a meeting held by the Democratic citizens of the county of Adams in Gettysburg upon Monday the 15th. Febry. instt. Resolved unanimously that a committee of five be appointed to draft an address to the General government on the present critical situation...
I suppose we must dispatch another packet, by the 1st. of Apr. at farthest. I take it to be an universal opinion that war will become preferable to a continuance of the embargo after a certain time. should we not then avail ourselves of the intervening period to procure a retraction of the obnoxious decrees peaceably if possible? an opening is given us by both parties sufficient to form a...
Notes on the British claims in the Missipi territory. 1803. Mar. 3. act of Congress gave to Mar. 31. 1804 to exhibit their claims or grants 1804. Mar. 27 do. gave to Nov. 30. 1804. & allowed transcripts instead of originals Etc. 1805. Mar. 2. do. gave to Dec. 1. 1805 to file their grants. & in fact to Jan. 1. 1807. time when the sale might begin. 1807. Dec. 15. the British claimants...
Notes on such parts of Foronda’s letter of Apr. 26. 08. as are worth answering. I. I know of no recent orders to Governor Claiborne as to the navigation of the Misipi, Yberville & Pontchartrain. he should specify them. but he may be told that no order has ever been given contrary to the rights of Spain. these rights are 1. a treaty right that ‘the ships of Spain coming directly from Spain or...
Your favors of the 11. 15. & 16. came to hand last night. the request of Turreau to be allowed a vessel to carry home another cargo of French citizens is admissible according to our former practice, only observing that the size of the vessel be proportioned to the number of passengers. I think also that Michaux, the botanist, may be allowed to go in our vessel, on the known usage of civilized...
I now return you the papers reserved from the last post. our regular answer to mr Livingston may well be that the Attorney General having given an official opinion that the right to the batture is in the US. and the matter being now referred to Congress, it is our duty to keep the grounds clear of any adversary possession until the legislature shall decide on it. I have carefully read mr....
Of the papers I recieved from you yesterday I have sent mr Graham’s letter (in favor of R. Brent as paymaster) to Genl. Dearborne, and that of the Lowries to mr Gallatin for information. all the rest are now returned. on some of them I will make short observations merely for your consideration and determination. Rademaker & Hills. I really think the good which may result from permitting...
I suppose the object of the inclosed information was to obtain a pardon; but as Judge Potter’s means of information respecting the opinion of the Supreme court in a like case may be imperfect, I think it would be best that the Attorney General should enquire into the case, and say whether a pardon ought to go on the ground of the illegality of the judgment.—I propose to leave this for...
I return you all the papers recieved from you by yesterday’s mail, except mr Burnley’s, which I shall send to the Secretary at war. altho’ all the appointments below field-officers are made, it is possible some may decline & open a way for new competition. I have observed that Turreau’s letters have for some time past changed their style unfavorably. I believe this is the first occasion he has...
Yours by yesterday’s mail is recieved & I now return Pinckney’s & Graham’s letters. I thought it best to forward the passport for Hill’s vessel to mr Graham direct lest it should lose a post by going in to Montpelier. with mr Grymes’s request of a vessel I can do nothing till further advised. the application is new, and I think unnecessary, as I presume the trade to N.O. is sufficiently open...
I retain mr Wilson’s letter, and return you his two certificates, as he may wish to keep them. If I ever heard his name before it has entirely escaped me. I do not believe he has been misrepresented to me, & doubt if he has been represented in any way. DNA : RG 59—LAR—Letters of Application and Recommendation.
Robert H. Jones of N. Carolina to be District attorney for N. Carolina. he resides at Warrenton. ViU .
The passport for the Leonidas goes by this post to the Collector of Norfolk. I return you Jarvis’s, Hackley’s & Montgomery’s letters, and send you Hull’s, Hunt’s, Clarke’s & Mr Short’s for perusal & to be returned. on this last the following questions arise. When exactly shall the next vessel go? whence? is not the secrecy of the mission essential? is it not the very ground of sending it while...
Yours of the 3d. is recieved. I also have recieved a letter from B. R. Randolph. who he is I know not. he may be of a family of Randalls of the neighborhood of Petersburg, who have lately begun to spell their names Randolph , tho’ totally unconnected with those of that name. one of them was not long since convicted of the murder of his father, and the family is generally in very ill...
Yours of the 7th. was recieved yesterday, but the post was so late, and arriving with his portmanteau open threw me into great alarm, as I expected a large sum of money in the mail. I was relieved by finding it safe. I return you Pinckney’s Joy’s, Claiborne’s, Foronda’s and Bailey’s letters. would it not be worth while to send Erskine a copy of Bailey’s letter, to observe to him that this...
Your’s of the 10th. came to hand yesterday & I return you Foronda’s, Tufts, Soderstrom’s & Turreau’s letters. I think it is become necessary to let Turreau understand explicitly that the vessels we permit foreign ministers to send away are merely transports for the conveyance of such of their subjects as were here at the time of the embargo, that the numbers must be proportioned to the vessels...
Yours of the 14th. is recieved and I now return the papers which accompanied it. I must cry peccavi as to the answer to Sullivan’s letter. I found it in the letter itself. I now inclose you two letters from mr Short. I fancy he is right in supposing that by the time he could arrive at the Baltic, it’s navigation would be uncertain, if not impracticable; but certainly it would be closed before...
The government of the US. will not make itself an accomplice in the crimes of invading a foreign nation which never did it a wrong, in the abduction of their people and selling them in slavery. PPAmP .
Yours of the 17th. came to hand yesterday. I wrote to mr Gallatin that the principle to govern our indulgencies of vessels to foreign ministers, was that it was fair to let them send home all their subjects caught here by the embargo & having no other means of getting home, proportioning the tonnage permitted to the number of persons according to the rules in the transport service; and that...
The last post brought me the counter addresses now inclosed. that from Ipswich is signed by 40. persons, the town meeting which voted the petition consisted of 30. there are 500. voters in the place. the Counter address of Boston has 700. signatures. the town meeting voting the petition is said to have consisted of 500. in the draught of an answer inclosed, I have taken the occasion of making...