You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Monroe, James
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 211 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
We have the honor to inclose the account which Should be annexed to the Convention transmitted you. The Bordeaux embargo is in Assignats, and two thirds will be deducted from many of the others. We have reason to think from a particular account now in our hands there will be Such considerable deductions as will reduce the whole charge to less than 20 millions of livres including the interest....
We have the pleasure to forward to you by Mr. Jay the ratification by the first Consul of the Treaty and conventions, which we concluded on the 30th. of April, with this Republic. We have heretofore forwarded to you the original instruments, and two Copies by different ways, the original by Havre, under the care of Mr. Hughes, who sailed about two weeks since, expressly charged with that...
We have been honored by your favors of the 18th April & the 28th May, as they both relate to measures that might lead to the accomplishment of the Treaty which was executed previous to their arrival no remarks upon them are necessary Except that one idea is held out in the last that Britain interested herself in preventing the possession of Louisiana by France. The fact is that she was totally...
We have the pleasure to transmit to you by Mr d’Erieux a Treaty which we have concluded with the french Republic for the Purchase & Cession of Louisiana. The negociation of this important object was committed on the part of France to Mr. Marbois, Minister of the Treasury, whose conduct therein has already received the Sanction of his Government, as appears by the Ratification of the first...
Letter not found. 11 October 1801. Acknowledged in JM to Monroe, 24 Oct. 1801 . Encloses letter for Robert R. Livingston.
The delicate state of health which my family has enjoyed of late, attributable as is supposed in a great measure to the atmosphere of London induced me to come here last week. A letter from Lord Mulgrave, which I received just before I left town, having revived the expectation that I should hear from him on the subject of my former ones; I thought it proper to apprize him of my proposed...
Since my letter of the 30th. ulto. some facts have come to my knowledge which it may be of advantage to you to know. I have been told that mister T—D has replied when pres[s]ed to aid the negotiation at Madrid that it could not be expected of him as a project of a very different character countenanced by our agent meaning mister L—N was before our government—this fact is unquestionable, as I...
I have the pleasure to inform you that I had an interview with Mr. Fox yesterday, in which we conferred on all the interesting topicks depending between our governments. The result was as satisfactory in respect to his own views as his more early communications had promised, and gave a prospect more favorable of the disposition of the Cabinet generally than I had anticipated. The substance of...
The opposition of Spain to our treaty with France, by her minister in the UStates, attracts some attention here, and is the subject of speculation in certain circles as to the causes & probable effects. Some suspect France at the bottom of it, others ascribe it to the measures of this govt.: but I am far from suspecting either of any agency in the affair. I see no reason to doubt the good...
The duties preparatory to the meeting of the Genl. assembly prevented an earlier appropriation of the 300. dolrs. sent you by Major Coleman. You will now receive a letter for Mr. Livingston informing him that you have been so kind as charge yourself with that sum as a fund for the payment of two swords which he is requested to purchase for this commonwealth. I must trouble you with another...
From every thing I can hear Mr. Merry is a worthy candid man, & I hope you will find him reasonable & have an easy time with him. I think it will have a good effect to apprize him of the manner in wh. I have spoken of my reception here, as of the sincerity of my desire to promote the objects of our govt. in promoting peace &ca. A like course may be equally useful with Mr. Pichon to whom I...
You will receive herewith the treaty & conventions wh. we have entered into with the govt. of France for the purchase of Louisiana, with our publick letter on the subject. Could we have procur’d a part of the territory we shod. never have thot. of getting the whole; but the decision of the consul was to sell the whole, and we cod. not obtain any change in his mind on the subject. So peculiarly...
My late letters will have communicated almost every thing that deserves notice at this time. The new ministry is not yet formed, but there seems now to be no doubt, of the present one’s withdrawing, & that Mr. Pitt, Mr. Fox, & their respective friends will take their places. The mind naturally looks forward to the consequences likely to result from such a change. The most probable & important...
It is said that a letter is just recd. in town from Phila. of the last of Decr. wh. states that Mr. Adams of the Senate is or will be appointed Envoy Extry. to this country to adjust the commercial differences between it & the UStates. The gentleman who gave me the information declined mentioning the name of the author or receiver of the letter, tho he thought the fact might be relied on. On...
I avail myself of the opportunity afforded by Mr. Biddle to communicate to you a copy of a correspondence, and the substance of a conference, between Mr. Canning and myself relative to the late aggression on the peace and sovereignty of the U. States, by the British Ship Leopard in an attack on the Chesapeak frigate off the Capes of Virginia. Mr. Canning’s private letter of July 25. which gave...
I received a note from Lord Harrowby on the 3d. instant requesting me to call on him at his office the next day, which I did. His Lordship asked me in what light was our treaty viewed by our goverment. I replied that it had been ratified with the exception of the 5th. Art:, as I had informed him on a former occasion. He observed that he meant the treaty of 1794, which by one of its...
My publick letter of the 8th shew’d the state of affrs. here, since which nothing has occurr’d to change it, having recd. no reply from Lord Harrowby. As I inferr’d from what passed in the interview, that the cabinet was yet to deliberate on the whole subject, and of course that it had never acted on it before or even heard of it, for Lord Harrowby told me that by some casualty the project...
I arrived on saturday so much fatigued that I found it was impossible to proceed by the route of Albemarle & Loudon back to Washington. A slight injury wh. I recd. in descending from the stage made the exn. of that project the more inexpedient. I therefore sent up for Major Jas. Lewis in whose hands I propose to leave my affrs. to come down; I expect him to morrow, and hope to adjust them so...
My last to you was of the 4th. by original and duplicate, to the care of Mr. Jarvis at Lisbon. Since Captain Dultons return we have done every thing in our power to conclude the negotiation by a treaty in case one could be obtained, or without it, if not to be had. The great delay of the Minister to send us an answer on the Western limits, induced us to enquire whether he meant to give one, or...
I have not yet presented a note to this govt. respecting the impressment of our seamen, as I intimated to you in my last I shod. do. Mr. Erving is very attentive to the object, who most probably obtains every thing that can be expected on it at this time. I am persuaded that at no former period had we so little cause of complaint for injuries under this practice. Some however have occurr’d...
I recd. on saturday yr. letters of the first inst. wh. were put in the mail on that day, with a copy of the laws of the UStates, and I recd. this morning my instructions, with the letters to our ministers abroad and other documents that were forwarded with them. The ship had clear’d at the custom house on saturday, my baggage was on board, and every preparatory measure was taken for sailing...
Our last to you was of the first instt. which was sent by original & duplicate by Bordeaux, in which you had copies of our correspondence with Mr. Cevallos to the 28 ulto. Since then we have discussed the question relative to W. Florida, in his last note on which point is a passage relative to France of which I enclose you an extract. Having in our note to him of the 26th. ulto. stated that...
I have recd. yr. communications by Mr. Baring, & shall write you in reply by Mr. Smith who sails the day after tomorrow (son of Genl. Smith) to New York. I shall avail myself of the same opportunity to write the President an acknowledgment of his. The object of this is to make known to you the bearer, a Mr. Herries, who visits our country with a view to make an establishment in the western or...
I have already forwarded you copies of two letters to Ld Mulgrave respecting the late seizure of American vessels, and you will receive with this a Copy of a third one. His Lordship has endeavourd to manage this business without writing, from a desire which has been very apparent to get rid of it, without any compromitment. With that view he gave me in an early interview, a report of the...
I have this moment recd. yr favor of sepr. 24. the only one for a great length of time. You will find by mine forwarded by Col: Mercer & subsequent letters how the business stands, on which you touch, with this govt. Lord Mulgrave has given no answer to my letters, nor have I heard anything of late from him, or indeed since the short one to that notifying my intention to sail to the UStates by...
I enclosed you today from the council chamber a copy of my correspondence with the bankers relative to the 120,000 dolrs. remitted by the late Secry of the Treasury to me at Paris for them, intending to write you fully this afternoon on that & some other subjects, but am prevented by compy. I have the original letters of the bankers, and other papers referr’d to in that correspondence, which I...
I have recd. yours of March 30th. with a list of the documents lately submitted to Congress, and the papers sent you from this place. I return to you those latter papers, on a presumption that you have not copies, of them, or rather the originals; if you have they can be of no use to you, & in that case I will thank you to send them back, or that you will send me copies at your leisure. My...
I enclose you several letters on subjects wh. are explained by the parties, better than I can otherwise do. That of our friend La Fayette is no further material than as it mentions his not having recd. the copy of the grant by Congress. You will return it to me when we meet. Respecting those of Mr. Forbes I can only say that I think him a worthy man, very attentive to the enterest of his...
I am too recently on this theatre to give you any information of the state of public affairs which you will not obtain of the Gazettes, wh. I shall therefore not repeat. It will be more useful to go back to the transactions in which I have been lately engaged, and to communicate some incidents which occurrd in them, with which you are not yet acquainted. The pressure of business at the time,...
Captn. Dulton having occasion for money in the UStates with a view to his accomodation I have given him a draft on you for the amt. here, for my expences <per? > for the sum of sixteen hundred sixty dolls. 14. cents. I send you a letter from the Chevalr. Frere containing some offcl. papers relative to his recall. He is a worthy man a friend of the UStates. He feels some sensibility to the...
Soon after my last I requested an interview with Lord Hawkesbury which took place on the 2d instant, in which I informed him, that I had received your instructions to propose to his government, the regulation by Convention, of certain points which I was persuaded both countries would find their advantage in placing on explicit and equitable ground. I stated to his Lordship the concerns it was...
As I shall write you a publick letter soon I take occasion to observe in this that the material changes in the ministry, are Mr. Pitt in the room of Mr. Addington, Ld. Harrowby in that of Ld. Hawkesbury who has taken that of Mr. Yorke retired; Ld. Melville at the head of the admiralty instead of Ld. St. Vincent. The Grenvilles & Wyndham refused to enter the ministry without Mr. Fox, who it is...
I wrote you on the 26th. ulto a private letter which was sent with my publick one of the day before by Liverpool, respecting some objections wh. had been made to me by some friends to the arrangment abt. our citizens creditors of France in the late treaties with that power. I promised you in that letter one to some friends, open to be delivered or withheld as you thought fit, explanatory of...
I hasten to inform you that this govt. has decided to send a minister to the UStates, to arrange with our govt. the reparation wh. is due for the attack on the Chesapeake. The policy of this measure in all its aspects I shall communicate to you without any avoidable delay. It may have more objects than the ostensible one, & therefore it shod. be recd. with caution. My communications with Mr...
I expected to have been presented to the King at the last levee according to the intimation of Lord Hawkesbury at our interview on my arrival; but the day before the levee Mr. Hammond called to express the regret of Lord Hawkesbury that the death of Lord Bristol the father of Lady Hawkesbury, which was known only the night before, put it out of his Lordships power to accompany me to the court...
Some days after Lord Harrowby returned from Weymouth I received from him a note of the 26th. ult. expressing his regret that he had been so engaged since his return, that he had not been able to see me, and, that he could not even then fix a time for the purpose. His note concluded with an invitation to dinner on the 29. at his house in the country. On an attentive consideration of the note...
I have seen Ld. Hawkesbury & expect to be presented to the King soon. I shall mention in my next publick letter what passed, which was not material, otherwise than as it alluded to the state in wh. I found the negotiation when I arrived at Paris, & the late treaty formed with G. B. for admitting her into the mississippi by Mr. King as I understand is the case of which I had heard nothing & of...
You will receive herewith a copy of the treaty and conventions which we have concluded with the French republick for the cession of Louisiana, the original of which was sent by Mr Hughes, and a copy lately by the way of England. This will be forwarded by Mr. Derieux respecting whom I wrote you in my last communication. Mr. Derieux is the person who was engaged to take our first dispatch to the...
I forward the inclosed to Havre in the hope it may find Mr. Jay there & be conveyed with our other dispatches by him. I shall now decide in a few days on the question relative to my trip to Spn. & inform you of it by the first opportunity. I shall certainly not go unless I find I may with safety as to things here & with some hope of advantage there. The French are in complete possession of...
I hasten to transmit to you a copy of a letter which I received yesterday from Lord Mulgrave in reply to mine of augt. 12. and Sepr. 23d. From the length of time which had elapsed, and other circumstances, I had almost concluded that his government had resolved not to enter on the subject, but to leave me to get its determination as I could⟨,⟩; from the decisions of the admiralty. I find...
Of the destruction of the austrian army, consisting of 100,000 men, and near Ulm on the Danube, under Gen. Mack, by the French commanded by the Emperor, you will have heard before this reaches you, as you likewise will of the naval victory which was obtained by Lord Nelson, who perished in the action, over the combined squadrons of France and Spain near Cadiz. I decline therefore giving the...
My publick letter, which with this is committed to Mr. Pinkney, gives you the substance of the last communication which passed between Ld. Harrowby & myself respecting the questions depending with this govt. on our part. Whenever this govt. finds that our’s is established in its present system, that the great mass of the people are with it, and that the party on which it has relied as devoted...
I was presented by Lord Hawkesbury to the King, on Wednesday the 17 instant, who recieved me with attention. The audience, according to usage was private, no other person being present. I endeavored in a short address which the occasion invites, is always expected & I believe made, to do justice to the amicable policy of our Government towards Great Britain. I informed his Majesty that I was...
I found on my return from Albemarle the day before yesterday yours of the 6th. wh. had arrived in my absence. Mrs. M. who recd. it forwarded immediately to Callendar that which was enclosed to him, very properly concluding it was more important he shod. receive it without delay, than that I shod. previously peruse it. As I do not know precisely the contents of yr. letter to him, I can make no...
This will be delivered to you by Col: Tatham who I have known for more than 20. years, at first a clerk of the council at Richmond. I have seen him here from my arrival to this period, frequently, and at his request, as he is about setting out for America, give him this to you. I consider him as a firm friend to the UStates of wh. he is a citizen, being there thro the whole of our revolution....
I arrived here to day, with my family in the American ship the Augustus in 28: days from Portsmouth. It is my intention to set out for Richmond without delay, & leaving my family there, to proceed thence to Washington, for the purpose of giving you all the information in my power respecting our affairs with the British government. We are much exhausted by fatigue & sickness on the voyage, &...
I intended to have written you at some length by this opportunity, but my engagements, of various kinds have put it out of my power. I send a triplicate of my last letter since which nothing interesting has occured, except my presentation to the court, or rather the King, which was attended by no remarkable circumstance. His deportment was civil & conciliating, as mine certainly was. The...
I informed you from Havre on the 9th. of my arrival there the day before, and that I should set out the day after for Paris. On the 12th. I arrived here, and on the 13th. was announced by Mr. Livingston to the Minister of foreign Relations, who received me yesterday in a Manner which was perfectly satisfactory. He said that the first Consul was much gratified by the disposition which our...
I enclose you two notes which I recd. from Baron Jacob, the Prussian minister here, requesting me to make enquiries respecting two persons mentioned in them, about whom he wishes to give information to his government. Will you be so good as make the necessary enquiries & communicate to me as soon as in yr. power what you hear respecting them. There is nothing new in our affairs here. The...
It is highly important that the Congress be immediately called and the treaty & conventions we have formed be carried into immediate effect, in all their stipulations. If the measure we have adopted is approved, no delay shod. occur, in performing what we are to perform, since a failure in any one point in the time specified may defeat & I think will defeat the whole. We shall be more full on...