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Your favor of the 12th. is just now at hand. with respect to the time of your departure it will depend on the return of mr Dawson with the ratification of the Convention. we may expect this in 4. months: so that you may have time enough to prepare for your departure soon after his arrival. we shall join with you a Secretary of legation, to guard against any accident happening to yourself: and...
Your favor of the 2d. has been duly recieved. it will be a subject of real regret if the regulation we have adopted does not meet your wishes, & the more so as it is too far gone to be changed, acceptances having been recieved . I explained to you in my former letter the principles on which it was done, to wit, 1. to train for public service in future such subjects as from their standing in...
Our Attorney general being absent, and none of the other members of the administration being professional lawyers, I am obliged to decide for myself in a case of law, which, in whatever way I decide, will make a great deal of noise. in this situation I ask the favor of you as a friend , and as a lawyer still in the habits of law reading, which I have not been for 30. years, to tell me what you...
The question of Neutral rights has not yet been taken up in our Cabinet. there is a visible leaning however to the liberal side. having had occasion in a particular case to state my own opinion privately, it will not be improper that Chancellor Livingston should see it; and the rather, as I believe my coadjutors, when we shall come to compare notes, will be found in the same sentiments. but...
The Principles insisted on by the English are that 1. free bottoms do not make free goods. 2. that a port may be blockaded by proclamation without force. 3. that Naval stores are contraband. 4. that belligerent may search neutral vessels, in all cases. 5. that Neutrals have no right to a commerce in war not permitted them in peace. When two nations chuse to go to war, it should in no wise...
I have recd. your favor of the 1st. instant. Your observations on Neutral rights & the means of promoting them are certainly very interesting, & will merit consideration. It is questionable however whether any leading arrangements by the U. States during the war, even in an eventual form adapted to a state of peace, would be free from the danger of entangling us too much in the present...
Your favor of the 10th. inst. came to hand yesterday, and I recieve it with the respect & attention with which I do every thing coming from you. nothing can be done on the subject of it till after my return to Washington which will probably be after your departure for France. whatever may be determined by the gentlemen of the administration on the subject of mr Davis, other candidates have...
Information is just received that the sloop of War, the Maryland, has arrived with despatches from Mr. Murray & Mr. Dawson. By some accident the despatches, tho’ forwarded from Washington have not yet got to hand. It appears however by letters alluding to their contents, that an objection is made by the French Government to the Treaty in the form given to it by striking out the second article....
You will recieve, probably by this post, from the Secretary of State, the final instructions for your mission to France. we have not thought it necessary to say any thing in them on the great question of the Maritime law of nations, which at present agitates Europe, that is to say, Whether free ships shall make free goods? because we do not mean to take any side in it during the war. but, as I...
You will herewith receive your commission as Minister Plenipotentiary from the U. States to the French Republic. You will also be furnished with copies of the instructions given to Mr. Dawson who carried to France the modified ratification of the Convention of the 30th of Sepr. last, and of those to Messrs. Elsworth and Murray charged with negociating a ratification in the same form by the...
You have already been informed of the intention of the President that your departure for France should be hastened, and that you would be furnished with a passage in the Boston Frigate, which after landing you at Bourdeaux, is to proceed to the Mediterranean. When this intention was communicated, it was understood that some difficulty had arisen in obtaining from the French Government a...
The bearer hereof, mr Tubeuffe, is the son of a gentleman of that name from France who settled in Virginia some years ago, and was unhappily murdered by some ruffians who made their escape. I was not acquainted personally with him or any of his family, but heard much of them from time to time, and always favorably. the inclosed letter from mr Giles however, as personally acquainted with their...
This is probably the last time I shall address you on this side the water. the occasion is furnished by a desire that you will be so good as to deliver the inclosed letter to my eleve and friend mr Short. I recommend him at the same time to your patronage and attentions. you will find him a man of great natural ability, compleatly read, and better acquainted with the world than most in it. he...
28 November 1801, Department of State, Washington. Requests Livingston’s aid in obtaining compensation for Elias Vander Horst, U.S. consul at Bristol, whose claim against the French government for the illegal seizure of some indigo by the French privateer Tyger is of long standing. Notes that Skip-with or Mountflorence can probably acquaint him with present state of the case. Letterbook copy (...
The Convention with the French Republic as finally exchanged by Mr. Murray arrived here on the 9th day of Octr last in the hands of Mr. Appleton. As the form of ratification by the French Government contained a clause declaratory of the effect given to the meaning of the Treaty by the suppression of the 2d. Article it was thought by the President most safe as a precedent to ask anew the...
27 January 1802, Department of State. At the request of Senator Sheafe of New Hampshire, provides this introduction for an agent who will carry claims and documents in support of them from Sheafe to Livingston. Requests Livingston’s “favorable attention to the business.” RC ( DNA : RG 76, France, French Spoliation Claims, box 5); letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6). 1 p. Sheafe’s agent...
This will be handed to you by Mr. Curwan who is charged with sundry claims by Mr. Stephan Gerard of Philada. against the French Republic. Mr. Gerard is a very respectable Merchant & Citizen of the U. States, and feels so strongly both the justice & importance of his claims, as to depute Mr. Curwan to Paris for the purpose of supporting them. He has expressed an anxiety also that they should be...
Your two favours of the 10, continued on the 12th Decr., and of the 31 of the same Month, have been duly received, as were the two of preceding dates written on your arrival at Nantz and L’Orient. We are anxious to know the result of your communications with the French Government on the subject of restitutions, both as to the rules by which they are to be settled, and the prospect of their...
Your favor of Dec. 26. was recieved the 5th. inst. and one of a later date to the Secretary of state has been communicated to me. the present is intended as a commentary on my letter to you of Aug. 28. when I wrote that letter I did not harbour a doubt that the disposition on that side the water was as cordial, as I knew our’s to be. I thought it important that the agents between us should be...
My last was of the 16th. instant to which I have nothing new to add on American claims, but to repeat our anxiety to learn the result of your proceedings on that subject. I have received yours of Jany 13th. with the papers to which it refers. The copy of the Treaty between France and Spain has been republished as you will find in the National Intelligencer of this City, from a Paris Gazette....
Mr. Latil a Frenchman by birth, but a Citizen of the U. States for near 20 years past, being about making a visit to his native Country, is desirous of being known to you. I have reason to believe that he possesses sufficient respectability and merit to entitle him to your civilities, and I therefore readily ask the favor of them in his behalf. I do it the more so as he has generally resided...
A favorable and a confidential opportunity offering by Mr. Dupont de Nemours, who is revisiting his native country, gives me an opportunity of sending you a cypher to be used between us, which will give you some trouble to understand, but, once understood, is the easiest to use, the most indecypherable, and varied by a new key with the greatest facility of any one I have ever known. I am in...
My last of which a duplicate is now sent, was of the twenty sixth day of March. I have since received yours not then acknowledged including the Dispatch of Feby 26 which came to hand two days ago. The conduct of the French Government in paying so little attention to its obligations under the Treaty, in neglecting its debts to our citizens, in giving no answers to your complaints and...
You will receive by Mr. Dupont herewith a public letter on th⟨ose⟩ subjects most important in your hands. You will receive at the same time a private letter from the President in which he refers for fuller communications than he gives on the subject of Louisiana & the Floridas. I have thought it best however not to go as far into certain views of the subject as he has done, because they are in...
I am within a few minutes of setting out on a short visit to Monticello, and must therefore be very short. 20 years of intimate acquaintance with M. Dupont de Nemours has given me an unlimited confidence in him. his dispositions in favor of this country as well as France are unquestionable, and his talents so well known that I presume his opinions will have great weight with the French...
The inclosed extract of a letter from Mr. Lear to Le Clerc the General in Chief at St. Domingo and of another from the latter to him, will explain an outrage against two respectable American Citizens, one of them lately an Officer in our Navy, which excites no less astonishment as a wanton departure from just principles than indignation as an insult to the United States. I inclose also the...
6 June 1802, Department of State. Introduces the bearer, Captain Johnson, who goes to Paris to prosecute the claim of Mr. Dunlap, an Alexandria merchant, against France. Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6). 1 p.
I have been lately furnished by Capt. Rodgers and Davidson, with their respective narratives of the outrageous treatment which they suffered from the French Administration at St. Domingo. These documents are now forwarded to you, and will enable you to press the subject on the French Government with the advantage to be derived from an accurate knowledge of its details. The insulting cruelties...
The departure of Made. Brugnard for France furnishes me a safe conveyance of a letter which I cannot avoid embracing, altho’ I have nothing particular for the subject of it. it is well however to be able to inform you, generally, through a safe channel, that we stand compleatly corrected of the error that either the government or the nation of France has any remains of friendship for us. the...
On my return from Virginia after an absence of two Months, I found here your letter of July 30th. Those of May 10. 12. 20. 28 June 8th & July 3d had been previously received. The zeal and energy with which you are urging on the French Government a fair construction and fulfilment of the Convention, and a discharge of all our just demands, render it unnecessary to repeat to you our anxiety that...
Having recieved from mr Short and others a very strong recommendation of M. Pougens a bookseller in Paris, and being desired to direct the procuring thence some books for the use of Congress, I thought to spare your time which is engaged on higher objects, & therefore desired mr Short by the inclosed letter to superintend the purchase, the details of which were to be executed by mr Duane and...
I am induced by the very favorable information given me of the promising merits of Mr. Cabell, the young gentleman who will hand you this, to ask the favor of your friendly attentions to him. He visits France I understand partly on account of his health, but with a laudable view also to the advantage of his mind. On the supposition that he will proceed with little delay from Bourdeaux the port...
Know Ye, That reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Abilities of James Monroe, late Governor of the State of Virginia, and of Robert R. Livingston, at present the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to the French Republic, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, appointed them the said Robert R. Livingston to be Minister...
My letters of Decr. 23d. and Jany. 3d. communicated the information which had been received at those dates, relating to the violation at New Orleans of our treaty with Spain; together with what had then passed between the House of Representatives and the Executive on the subject. I now enclose a subsequent resolution of that Branch of the Legislature. Such of the debates connected with it, as...
My last to you was by mr Dupont . since that I have recieved yours of May 22. mr Madison supposes you have written a subsequent one which has never come to hand.   A late suspension by the Intendant of N. Orleans of our right of deposit there, without which the right of navigation is impracticable has thrown this country into such a flame of hostile disposition as can scarcely be described....
I have the honor to inclose copies of a communication made to me by the Senat⟨ors⟩ from Massachusetts and of an order of the House of Representatives of the United States whence it appears that the authorities of the Island of Guadaloupe have, in two instances, forced obnoxious people of colour on board of our vessels, to be transported hither. A Bill is now depending before Congress, relative...
Since my last which was of the 18th day of January, I have received your several letters of the 11th and 14th November, 1802. As you will receive this from the hands of Mr. Monroe, I refer to him for full information relative to our internal affairs generally, and in particular to the violation of our right of deposit at New Orleans, with the impressions and proceedings which have resulted...
You will herewith receive a Commission and letters of Credence, one of you as Minister Plenipotentiary, the other as Minister Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, to treat with the Government of the French Republic, on the Subject of the Mississipi, and the Territories Eastward thereof, and without the limits of the United States. The object in view is to procure by just and satisfactory...
I have the honor to enclose you an application from Col. Leven Powell of Virginia, relative to a claim he makes upon the French Government for losses sustained by him about the year 1792. by reason of the stoppage, by French authority, of the Mail in which some bills of exchange in which he had an interest were passing to England; the same bills having been afterwards depreciated and paid to...
The reasonable and friendly views with which you have been instructed by the President to enter into negociations with the French Government justify him in expecting from them an issue favorable to the tranquillity and to the useful relations between the two Countries. It is not forgotten however that these views, instead of being reciprocal, may find, on the part of France, a temper adverse...
Inclosed herewith is a Blank Commission for the Consulate at Antwerp, vacated by the translation of Mr. Barnett to Havre de Grace. The President wishes the Blank to be filled with the name of Daniel Strobel if that gentleman chuses to accept the appointment; and in case of his declining it, with the name of Jacob Ridgway. The latter is established at Antwerp, and so I believe is the former....
Your several letters of March 3. 11. 18 & 24th with their inclosures have been duly received, as has been that of March 12th to the President. According to the request in this last, I now acknowledge also, or perhaps repeat the acknowledgment of the two papers inclosed, the one in your letter of Feby 26, the other in that of Augt. 10th. 1802. The assurances given by the Chief Consul on the...
Since my last which was of April 18th the tenor of our information from France and Great Britain renders a war between those powers in the highest degree probable. It may be inferred at the same time from the information given by Mr. Livingston and Mr. King that the importance of the United States is rising fast in the estimation both of the French and British cabinets and that Louisiana is as...
Since the date of my last which was May 24 I have received your several letters of April 11. 13. & 17th and May 12th. As they relate almost wholly to the subject which was happily terminated on the 30th April, a particular answer is rendered unnecessary by that event and by the answer, which goes by this conveyance to the joint letter from yourself and Mr Monroe of the 13th of May. It will...
Your dispatches including the Treaty and two Conventions signed with a French Plenipotentiary on the 30th of April were safely delivered on the 14th by Mr. Hughes, to whose care you had committed them. In concurring with the disposition of the French Government to treat for the whole of Louisiana although the western part of it was not embraced by your powers you were justified by the solid...
The bearer hereof is mr Robert Carter , one of the sons of Colo. Charles Carter of Shirley in this state, our first citizen in point of wealth, and head of one of the oldest & most distinguished families in it. the son having past some time in the study of medicine & surgery in Philadelphia, now goes to London, Edinburgh, & Paris to pursue the same studies. apprehensive that in the present...
My last was of July 29th. written a few days before my departure for Virginia, whence I returned as did the President ten or twelve days ago. Your letters received since that date are of May 20. June 3. & 25. July 11. 12 & 30th. In the reply to the communication made by the French Government on the subject of the war, you are charged by the President to express the deep regret felt by the...
One of the inclosed Memorials, respecting claims which are made upon the French Government for bills drawn by its Agents in St Domingo and which remain unpaid, having been presented to the Senate, its subscribers had leave to withdraw it, and with the other, which has never been preferred to Congress, has now been brought before the Executive, with a view to a referrence of the subject to your...
Jerome Bonaparte who came to this country with a view to a more secure passage to Europe, has been smitten, it seems, with a young lady in Baltimore, and the result is to be a marriage which will probably have taken place before this leaves the port to which it is sent. It is to be hoped that the connection will be more auspicious to the happiness of the parties, than the suddeness of it and...
A report reaches us this day from Baltimore (on probable, but not certain grounds) that Mr. Jerome Bonaparte, brother of the first Consul, was yesterday married to miss Patterson of that city.* *Nov. 8. It is now said that it did not take place on the 3d. but will this day. the effect of this measure on the mind of the first Consul, is not for me to suppose: but as it might occur to him, primâ...