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I now inclose you the letter for mr Appleton which covers one for mr Mazzei according to promise. I have considered the case of mr Lenthall according to your letter of Feb. 29. 04. and to the statement you put into my hands the other day, and I approve of your allowing him three dollars & two thirds a day. pressed with business before my departure I can only add my salutations and assurances...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Latrobe and returns him the volume of Parkyns’ Monastic remains, with his thanks for the opportunity of looking over them. if the Maisons de Paris is arrived Th:J. will be glad to recieve it, as he sets out for Monticello tomorrow or next day. if convenient to mr Latrobe Th:J. will be glad to meet him at the Capitol to-day between one & two aclock....
It would be well to recieve from you as early as possible the report you propose to make for Congress as to the progress, state and further cost of the public buildings. I am apprehensive of a more serious opposition to another appropriation than has ever been made. perhaps after you shall have sent me the report, & it is referred to a committee it may be expedient you should come up yourself...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Latrobe, and in consequence of his information yesterday that there is a great deal of broken glass which may be cut into sizes sufficient for private purposes, but not for the public buildings, & which it would ease those funds to dispose of, he prays him to have prepared for him the following parcels, to be packed in boxes ready for...
Mr. Munroe has just communicated to me a statement by which it appears that there remained but 17,000. D. in the treasury of the monies appropriated for the South wing of the Capitol, of which sum I have now given him a warrant for 10,000. D. so that no more than 7000. D. remain subject to future draughts. I mention this, as it renders it necessary that not another Dollar may be expended or...
I had the honor of writing to you on the departure of the Sculptors, and afterwards, & to give you every necessary information relative to the Statue of Liberty, of which you appeared so desirous to be informed. Either my letters to you, or yours in reply have miscarried, but the truth is, I have not received a line from you since the one in which you requested my services. You will therefore...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Latrobe. he delivered yesterday to Colo. Tatham (who said he was to meet mr Latrobe at 10. oclock, and therefore came to ask them) every drawing of the capitol he was able to find, & which, as he then supposed, he possessed but after he was gone he found another which he suspects to be exactly the one mr Latrobe desires, as he observes in it a part...
Yours of the 13th. came to hand only yesterday, having been delayed by the high waters consequent on the rain of the 11th. & 12. I am quite willing that the earth for finishing the N.W. quarter of the ground at the President’s house, should be taken from the cut marked B in your drawing, instead of the place from O to I as proposed by me, either way kills two birds with one stone. To remedy...
I inclose you the bill appropriating 110,000 D. for the South wing of the capitol & 20,000. for the North wing & other public buildings as it has past the H. of R. with only 17. dissenting votes. I have no reason to suppose it will fare worse with the Senate: but till it passes them it will not be safe to take any positive steps. I will endeavor to have it hurried there, and as soon as it...
The bill appropriating 110,000. D. for the South wing & 20,000. for the other public buildings. is passed—it would be well therefore to contract for the materials immediately, and to begin at once all the branches of the wooden work which can be done independantly of the walls. also to order the paving tile from Bourdeaux, Havre being blockaded. mr Lee our Consul there will do any thing in...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Latrobe and returns his report in which he will find some notes. they respect to a misplacing of the expences of the roads on the North & South sides of the President’s lot to the debet of the fund of 15000. D. for the Pr’s house & lot, instead of charging it to the fund of 3000. D. for avenues and roads. 2. a special statement of the account of the...
I took a note last night of the appropriations of the bill for the public buildings, they are as follow. for Debts 51,400. D. for the Wall round the President’s square } ‘so as to close this part of the expenditure’ 14,000. D. Planting the grounds Steps at the principal entrance  South wing, finishing—11,500. D.  North wing 25,000. D. We will consider these heads singly. Debts. under this head...
Having paid to mr Munro the amount of the glass I purchased from the public, I wish to say a few words in explanation. I was induced to take it, because of it’s convenience on the spot, & on your mentioning that it would be sold at what it cost the public, and would be a benefit to the public in taking off their broken fragments which were too small to be applied to any use for them. the...
The H. of R. having by a resolution requested me to take effectual measures for the completion of the S. wing of the Capitol by the commencement of the next session, it becomes my duty to be under a constant & well supported certainty that the work (except such internal stone carving as may be done at leisure hereafter) is making such progress as will admit it’s being ready by a fixed day....
I found your letters of the 12th. & 14th. on my return to this place on the 17th. and such was the mass of business accumulated during my absence that I have not been able sooner to answer them.   I am very happy that there is no doubt of the readiness of Congress hall for the meeting of that body.   with respect to the North wing I like well all your ideas except that of introducing a Cupola...
Since my letter of the 22d. mr King has shewn me the alterations of your original design of the Contour of the grounds around this house, & I find they are precisely what I proposed in my letter except as to the extent of ground to be allowed to the offices, which may be a subject of consideration hereafter. this is but the 2d. day of the Labourers working on the S.E. quarter, & it begins...
I returned here on the 30th. Ult. and confess myself much disappointed in the progress of the Capitol. mr Lenthall urges the general sickness among his hands as the cause, and from my entire confidence in his diligence I have no doubt as much has been done as could be by the hands he had. the error has been in not engaging others so as to keep up a sufficient number constantly at work. I am...
I was so extremely sick on both the days you were so kind as to call on me that I had been obliged to desire the porter to recieve nobody, except the Secretaries. I am now well enough to do business & shall be glad to see you whenever it shall be convenient to you to call. in the mean time I will observe that the information you have recieved that I was displeased with the mode of lighting the...
Another reporting day has come about, and by mr Lenthall’s report I find the stone work falling more & more behind and keeping back the work of the Carpenters & Plaisterers. instead of 6. stone cutters, which might have sufficed at the date of my former letter, 12. at least will now be necessary, & every days delay of their arrival must still add to the number to be sent on. price must not be...
I am told there are good workmen who will undertake the wall of our inclosure at 2 ½ D. per perch. this saving alone (or difference between that & last year’s price) would build our South porch. I have no doubt of your attention to this, and that you will avail us of the benefits of competition by inviting proposals generally. you proposed to carry up the hewn stone work of the gates as high...
On considering the amount of our 15,000. D. fund and it’s objects, to wit, 1. finishing the offices of the Pres’s house, 2. smoothing the ground, and 3. inclosing it, and sensible it would not do the whole, I concluded that it was best to do the first absolutely, to do all that part of the 2d. which will require but a moderate sum, & then such a portion only of the inclosure as the balance...
In order to keep within our power the completion of the South wing of the Capitol, as desired by the H. of R. I have requested mr Lenthall to report to me, at the epochs stated in your estimate, the progress actually made. the report of this day should have stated 1. all the columns on the E. side set up. this is done. 2. the West architrave up. half only up. i.e. ¼ of the whole. 3. grounds...
When we were conversing last on the digging & smoothing the ground round the President’s house, you mentioned that there would be wanting some earth to be dug to fill up the Northwest angle of the ground. as I have in contemplation to extend the offices at the West end of the house 50. feet further Westwardly, I should be glad that the earth wanting for the N.W. angle should be procured by...
Yours of Aug. 31. has been recieved. the partition you propose in the clerk’s office of the Senate is readily approved, as it will not injure the room for that purpose, and is necessary to support the decayed beam. this latter consideration will justify it to the Senate even should it not be otherwise agreeable to them. but the division of the semicircular Vestibule I cannot say I approve. it...
Your letters of the 1st. 2d. & 5th. are recieved. I am really afraid to move the Supreme court from the room they at present occupy, altho’ it be but an indifferent one. public bodies of high standing would expect the respect of being at least consulted, & not to be removed from their quarters but on high & imperious considerations. by leaving them in their quarters too, we have the question...
Yours of the 11th. was recieved on the 15th. but too much other business having made it impossible to answer by the return of that post, I avail myself of the first afterwards to say that as I propose to set out for Washington in a week I will defer concluding about fixing up the court room for the Senate till I see you in Washington. this will not occasion more than a week’s delay, and you...
Being to leave this for Monticello tomorrow I have to express to you my earnest request that so many workmen may be employed on both wings of the Capitol as to have them ready for the Upholsterers to go into by the last day of September, and the whole in readiness for Congress before their meeting. I shall be here the 5th. of October if nothing calls me sooner. I must further request that the...
Your’s of the 14th. came to hand on the 20th. The idea of spending 1000. D. for the temporary purpose of covering the pannel lights over the representatives chamber, merely that the room may be plaistered before the roof is closed, is totally inadmissible. but I do not see why that particular part of the plaistering should not be postponed until the pannel lights are glazed. I hope there is no...
I return you mr Lenthal’s letter, on which the most painful observation is that it furnishes proof in addition to suggestions which have been recieved that he is not always in a state of temperance. should he take this turn, he would be a real loss. I have by this post desired mr Munroe to settle his account @ 4. D. a day, back from the beginning because that seems to have been his own...
In my letter of Oct. 5. I asked the favor of you to have me furnished with 100 sheets of rolled iron 16. I. wide and 11. f. 8. I. long, and pressed the welding the ends of the sheets together in the manner of a model of paper therein inclosed as greatly preferable to tucking them in the ordinary way, a process which I suppose known at all the works, as I have heretofore recieved such from the...
Having returned a few days since, I called on mr Ludlow to have the offices for this house now begun. he told me he awaited your instructions, papers etc and would write to you immediately. having three months now before our Autumnal recess I should be glad this work could be pushed on such a scale as to compleat one end at least while I am here. having given you the only sketches I had of the...
My letter of yesterday was gone before I recieved yours of Apr. 29. & May 19. or I should not have written it, the latter one placing me at ease as to the glass for the skylights which was the principal object of my writing it. A third gang, nearly as strong as the other two, has now got to work on our grounds, so that in a short time they will begin to shew handsomely.   they are beginning...
I could not sooner return your drawings, because I could not till yesterday have a conference with mr Gallatin. some parts of your propositions being approved, some doubtful, some not satisfactory. I can only write short observations as texts for consideration, and to be discussed vivâ voce when you come here. the piers instead of half columns at the junction of the new with the old buildings...
Your favor of May 23. is duly recieved, and reserving fuller explanations to my return, which will be during the next week, I shall enter into some brief explanations at present. on the dissolution of the board of Directors of the public buildings, and substituting by law a Superintendant to exercise all their functions, the numerous litigations in which the city rights were involved, and mr...