You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Eppes, John Wayles
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 1

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Eppes, John Wayles" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-31 of 31 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
[unfavorable change in appearances there, unless we consider as such a procrastination which may be fairly ascribed to other causes. We find from our last information that we shall have one of the finest roads in the world from Athens to Fort Stoddert, which is within 180 miles of New Orleans. This last distance will admit a good road but an expensive one. All the stuff you see in the papers...
Your two letters of Aug. 9. & Sep. 21. were duly recieved: and altho’, according to the latter I may expect your servant tomorrow, if you succeed in the purchase of the horse, yet as mr Coles is now here & proposes to go by the way of Eppington I think it surest to answer by him. I have had your table, copying press & bust well packed in a box, and as I am sure it would be agreeable to mrs...
In revising my philosophical apparatus I find I have some articles to spare which will be of use to Francis when he comes to that part of his education, and may in the mean time amuse yourself. these are Martin’s portable air pump & apparatus by Dollond an Hydrostatic balance by Dollond a Solar microscope in brass, with Wilson’s pocket apparatus by Dollond a best barometer. a Camera obscura,...
It is now long since I have heard from Maria or yourself. Congress will rise certainly on the 3d. and I shall leave this on the 5th. for Monticello where I shall be one fortnight, and return hither. I mention my movements that if you should be meditating a visit to your plantation about that time we may meet, and at any rate that you may know whither to direct a letter to me. no important...
Yours of the 16th. was recieved the day before yesterday; and altho’ I do not foresee a conveyance of the present, yet I write it to be ready for any one which shall occur. my intentions of having the levelling done at Pantops have continued, because till that is done, no planting of trees or other improvement, could be undertaken. I am now engaged in levelling my own garden. I have fewer...
After the inclosed was written & delivered to mr Coles, your servant arrived; I therefore send it by him instead of mr Coles. the purchase of the horse may lie till we meet in Washington as I shall not be in want of one during the winter. the two boxes with the harpsichord, table Etc were sent to mr Higginbotham yesterday to be forwarded by the boats to Gibson & Jefferson. a rod belonging to...
Yours of the 3d. is recieved. at that time I presume you had not got mine of June 19. asking the favor of you to procure me a horse. I have lost three since you left this place. however I can get along with the three I have remaining so as to give time for looking up a fourth suitable in as many points as can be obtained. my happiness at Monticello (if I am able to go there) will be lessened...
Your’s of the 14th. came to hand last night, and I am glad it was written before mine of the 13th. could have been recieved, because that might have delayed the expression of your convenience. the 400. D. shall be remitted to G. Jefferson the first week in May for you. I remit it there because it appears that the conveyance by post between that place & you is too tardy & unsafe to be relied...
My last to you was of the 31st. of Jan. I now inclose you one for Maria. the H. of R. decided the great question on the repeal of the late judiciary bill, the night before last, by 60. against 31. it was yesterday past to the 3d. reading, and I expect it will be finally passed this day. this done, I am in hopes they will press forward the other important matters, as the season is now advancing...
Your letter of the 5th. mentioning that you should be at Eppington till the 14th. & then proceed to Cumberland did not get here till the 15th. it had either been put into the post-office at Richmond after the mail hour, or loitered there a week. I thank you for your attention to the purchase of a horse. I now send for him, & the bearer goes first to Cumberland, & if yourself or the horse...
I arrived here on the 4th. inst. and found the family at Edgehill all well. we are now all together at this place, and only want the addition of your’s and my dear Maria’s company to be entirely happy. I shall leave it pointedly on the 25th. if not some days before. mr Overton is married & settled adjoining us. Nancy Jefferson is said to be about marrying Charles Lewis. this is our only small...
Your’s of the 6th. is recieved. I have not yet heard any thing from mr Hancocke respecting the syrup of punch.   I remit monies to G. Jefferson by this post, out of which he will answer the 400 D. for which I now inclose you an order. If the proposition you make of the exchange of the lands in Bedford for Lego, involved no further consequence, the difficulties would be lessened. but a...
Martin arrived here the night before last & delivered safely yours of the 22d. I learn with great pleasure the good health of yourself & the good family of Eppington & particularly of our dear Francis. I have little fear but that he will out grow those attacks which have given us such frequent uneasiness. I shall hope to see him well here next winter & that our grounds will be in such a state...
Not understanding the conveyance to you by post beyond Richmond, I have thought it safest to remit the 100. D. for you to Gibson & Jefferson, subject to your order, which is done this day. I was never better pleased with a riding horse than with Jacobin. it is now really a luxury to me to ride.   The early prevalence of sickness here this season will probably drive us hence earlier than usual,...
I wrote to Maria on the 14th. of Dec. My occupations are now so incessant that I cannot command a moment for my friends. 7. hours of close business in the forepart of the day, and 4. in the evening leave little time for exercise or relaxation. Congress have not yet done anything, nor passed a vote which has produced a party division. the sending a message, instead of making a speech to be...
Yours of the 14th. came to hand last night. I am glad you are all well so far, but having terrible apprehensions of the Hundred after the warm weather sets in, I should have been better pleased to learn you would go to Monticello immediately from whence you could make your trip to the Louisa springs if necessary at your convenience. groceries & other necessaries for summer use at Monticello...
In my letter to you from Monticello by your servant I had concluded to let the purchase of the horse lie till you should come here. but I find I am obliged to get another & without much delay: & that therefore I had better not let the chance slip out of my hands of getting Major Egglestone’s horse, for taking into consideration his price, & the circumstance of it’s being known that he draws...
Yours of the 22d. by Martin is recieved together with the horse. in the exchange we have made my own knolege of the horse recived is sufficient to prevent all after-claims as to his soundness, should he become unsound. so frequently the lot of horses the loss must be mine, without affecting you. With respect to the land at Poplar forest you are free to enter into occupation of it when you...
Your’s of the 10th. was recieved on the 16th. I shall leave this about the 6th. of March, unless unexpected business, bad roads or bad weather should delay it a little. I am happy to learn that I shall meet Maria & yourself at Monticello. my stay there will be of two or three weeks, the visit being for the purpose of planting trees, in order that they may be growing during my absence. as Lilly...
Yesterday morning I recieved information of Maria’s safe arrival at Edgehill. some apprehension that Francis had recieved the infection of the measles on the road had determined her to await there the usual term of it’s appearance. I have to acknolege several letters from you . Colo. Monroe arrived here the night before last, not having previously heard of his appointment to Paris & Madrid to...
Martin & Davy arrived on the 20th. with the horses. I am perfectly satisfied with them all, & they completely answer my expectations. they are dear certainly, but horses, less perfect, however cheaper, would not have answered my purpose at all, so that I think the extra prices better submitted to. your draughts will be duly honored & provided for at maturity. the horses being tried in the...
The family arrived here yesterday morning , without accident. mr Lilly’s order for £40. his wages & £20. for Austin is good. I have lately remitted to John Perry the whole balance due him to the completion of the South East offices; and our bargain is, whenever a compleat job is done & settled it is to be paid for. he says the shop is done, and that it will amount to £60 although he always...
I have lost two days ago the most valuable horse I had remaining (Turn-coat). a constipation of the bowels which nothing could remove carried him off in 24. hours. I am now reduced to 2. carriage horses, Castor & Fitzpartner; they are old & do not match. I can not get along without another, & therefore must pray you to get me one to match Castor. a perfect match I cannot expect, but if he is...
As it gives room for federal clamour for me ever to say any thing about an election, what I am now to say is confidential. Genl. Mason arrived here yesterday. I spoke to him on the subject of the resignation which he had meditated. he expressed great anxiety to withdraw, but finally said that if re-elected he would serve again. you can therefore affirm as a thing known to you through a single...
I wrote to you the day before yesterday, since that I have taken a more correct view of my [probable] receipts & expenditures and find that I may venture to take Haxall’s horse immediately at 500. doll. paiable at 90. days. it would be a great inconvenience to have to send from Washington for directions; & on the [other hand] a convenience to have […] brought to Monticello by the messenger who...
Your favor of the 12th . came to hand this morning, and brings me the always welcome tidings of your’s & Maria’s health. I sincerely wish she had gone to Monticello sooner: but as it is, you must not aim at more than 20. miles a day, nor to go much out of a walk, but in the safest road, for it is the oversetting or breaking down which is to be apprehended, and is less violent in proportion as...
On reciept of your letter I sent Joseph into the country to enquire into the situation of the mare. he reported that the people there thought she had a month to go; he thought less, because he observed her bag enlarged. mr Randolph recovers strength remarkeably slow, & I am now in the 8th day of periodical head-ach which threatens to be obstinate. I question if we get from here under a...
Your letters of July 16. & 29. both came to me on the 2d instant . I recieve with great delight the information of the perfect health of our dear infants, and hope to see yourself, the family, and them, as soon as circumstances admit. with respect to Melinda I have too many already to leave here in idleness when I go away; and at Washington I prefer white servants, who, when they misbehave,...
Understanding that you thought of building some time ere long on the upper Pantops, I mentioned to Maria (I do not recollect whether I did to you) that I thought it indispensable that the ground should be first levelled as that of Monticello is, and that if you would be at the trouble of hiring hands, & having the work done, I would pay their hire: and this I recommend to you: desirous of...
Yours of the 6th. has been duly recieved. but the printer has been slow in making up for me the documents you desired. they are now inclosed. the Census is not yet printed. the bill for the Military establishment , on the scale proposed by the Executive, passed the H. of R. yesterday by about 58. or 60. votes against 12. a proposition to strike out the Brigadier General had a good deal divided...
According to the plan I had proposed of each of us answering immediately on reciept of a letter from the other, by which means we should keep up a continued correspondence, & hear mutually about once a fortnight, I was waiting a letter from you, and began to be very uneasy, when yesterday yours of the 18th. came to hand. I set out the last day of this month for Monticello, where I shall remain...