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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Dinsmore, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Your’s of the 5th . is recieved this day. I wonder the Copper sheets had not got to hand, as it is very long since they left Philadelphia. the steps, or plinths for the dome must be got from Fluvanna. as there seems to be too little dependance on Reuben Perry to let the whole work of the housejoiner & plaisterer depend on him alone, I will pray you to engage some other person to go on with the...
I have just learned by letters from mr Traquair & mr Jefferson that mr Stewart is gone on, having arrived at Richmond the 17th. inst. so that I presume he is with you by this time. I am rendered uneasy by the account I have of the condition in which he was there. if it be habitual, he could not be trusted with the superintendance of the nailery. Mr. Traquair had once before got alarmed on the...
This is merely to correct an error in my last . I mentioned that the brick pilasters should have their Capitals 3. courses of brick high & with 3. projections. but as the Capital should be in height only half the diameter, & that is of a brick and a half, say 13. I. the height of the capital must be of 2. courses only, each course projecting 1.¼ I. so as to make the upper one 2. bricks square....
Yours of the 17th. is recieved. a very useful emploiment for mr. Fitch will be the partitioning the side and end of the kitchen, and studding the 3. servants rooms. the kitchen partitions are to be of inch plank, planed on both sides, & square jointed. the front & partitions of the servants rooms and dairy to be bricknogged, with good lime mortar: or perhaps the front of the dairy had better...
Your’s of the 12th . did not get to hand till last night. the ornaments for the frize of the chamber left this on the 10th. and are probably at Richmond by this time. but I shall be at home on Sunday, as early as they will arrive. from what you mention of the rotting of the sleepers of the Bow part of the Parlour, & the ends of the other, I presume that wall was close & that they have dry...
On opening the door leading from the passage into my bookroom, and on the shelves to the left, immediately on entrance, are a parcel of locks which I omitted to give out to mr Perry to be put on the doors he made. there are 3. small Cup-board locks for the 3. lockers in the kitchen. 3. japanned closet locks, for the 3. servants rooms, and a 4th. I think for the North necessary. of the stock...
Your’s of Nov. 25 is recieved and I have ordered the patera wanting for the tea-room. with respect to the joists for the N. West wing of offices, I leave it to yourself to decide; only let there be no danger of failure for want of due strength. I am quite at a loss about the nailboys remaining with mr Stewart. they have long been a dead expense instead of a profit to me. in truth they require...
I some days ago wrote directions to mr Lilly for filling the Icehouse : but I forgot one previous requisite, which I must get you to have done. make a long square tube , open at both ends, 6. I. square within, & reaching from the bottom of the well of the icehouse up through the flat roof. the bottom of the tube to be notched thus to let water run into it at bottom. then make a square bucket...
I conclude absolutely to cover my terras with sheet iron , and have accordingly written to Philadelphia to see if I can procure sheets 15. I. wide and 9½ f. long.—The method of doing it is shewn below Fig. 1. it consists in forming gutters across the terras declining from the ridge pole to the eaves, the gutters being 21. I. horizontal measure each. We shall take off the present shingling, and...
Yours of the 1st. & 9th. have been recieved, and the last has much relieved me as to the last box or boxes of Composition ornament. it was impossible to think of taking mr Hudson’s cherry , for which he asked five times what has ever been given within my knolege. I hope mr Meriwether’s will suffice for the parlour, and we must take time for the rest. I am told there is great difference in...
MS ( MHi ); undated; entirely in TJ’s hand; see Nichols, Architectural Drawings Frederick Doveton Nichols, Thomas Jefferson’s Architectural Drawings, Compiled and with Commentary and a Check List , Charlottesville, 1978 , No. 160. Although the Editors cannnot be completely certain that this sketch was among those enclosed by TJ, the above drawing matches almost exactly the design that Dinsmore...
I return you the drawings for the architrave of the front of the gallery, with a preference of that marked b. with the rounded listel. I do not approve of cutting the wall, not even the cellar wall, to make a space for the descent of the clock weights ; but would have them advanced into the room so as to descend clear even of the cellar wall. should the box in this case encroach too much on...
After writing to you yesterday, I was at the painting room of mr Stewart (the celebrated portrait painter) who had first suggested to me the painting a floor green, which he had himself tried with fine effect. he observed that care should be taken to hit the true grass -green, & as he had his pallet & colours in his hand, I asked him to give me a specimen of the colour, which he instantly...
Your’s of the 22d. came to hand yesterday. I inclose you two specimens of cherry, one done with boiled linseed oil, the other with the newspaper composition you referred to. I think the former the best; but am inclined to believe that daily rubbing with wax will soon produce the same effect. I rather think therefore of leaving the floor to time to give it’s proper colour. as you will but...
I find by Latrobe & Mifflin’s account that on the 7th. of Aug. they shipped for me from Philadelphia 2. boxes of sheet iron weighing 7C—2n/2.—16℔ has it ever been recieved? be so good as to inform me by return of post as I am called on for paiment. I never sent to them for sheet iron but twice. the question is then whether we have recieved a supply of sheet iron once only, or twice. best...
In answer to your letter of the 20th. I would prefer that the door of the North pavilion should be a folding one, opening from the outer architrave into the jamb, so as to enter the room but a little below the chairboard, within, it is to be plaistered. the cornice to be Tuscan of the form of that used in the bedrooms of the house, but proportioned to the height of the room, that is to say,...
Will you be so good as to press mr Jordan for the circular bricks? the semicircular cast iron sashes will be at Monticello before I shall, & I shall be anxious while at home to get them put in. mr Barry will be with us about the last of September, before which the glass will be recieved, & also the sheet iron for the South offices. I salute you with my best wishes. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Mr. Barry is engaged in some painting for this house & the Capitol, and tells me he can get a crate of window glass here for Monticello; & he thinks it safest that he should cut it here & pack it because it will be so much less liable to break in small plates than great ones. I must therefore get you to cut models of the circular panes in stiff writing paper & inclose them to me by the return...
We have finished two large windows of this house with Venetian blinds in the place of window shutters, and shutting into the jambs as the shutters would. They are beautiful & convenient. the slats move on 2. pivots as mine do, and are made to lie close when shut into the jamb that they may occupy less thickness. I think the following windows in my house may be advantageously finished in this...
I wrote to mr Jefferson, on my arrival here, to forward 1000 ℔ of lead to Monticello, and yesterday I recieved a letter from him informing me he could find but 50. ℔ of lead in all Richmond, & for that they asked 1/. the ℔ considering the price & difficulty of the article, I refer it to your consideration whether it will not be better to have the weights cast here of iron, where they will be...
Your’s of the 16th. was recieved by last post. I should certainly prefer Walnut for the Bedford sashes, because well rubbed on the inside & unpainted it has a richer look than a painted sash, and I believe no wood is more durable but if you cannot get it good, then certainly good pine will be preferable to bad walnut. it must therefore depend on your being able to get good walnut & without...
I find that the window weights will be so small & long that the small degree of warping which happens in their cooling will probably render them useless; I have therefore this day ordered 1000. lb. of pig lead from Philada, which I observe costs but ¾ of the price of bar-lead, to wit, 10 cents, and I presume is as good for our purpose. you may expect it at Richmond in 3. weeks from this time....
Davy brings a box containing all the articles you wrote for, furnished by Doctr. Ott.   The lead (1036. 1b) left Philadelphia the 7th. instant.   I will thank you to tell mr Bacon that I forgot, in my letter to him, to tell him that I sent off from this place, 3. or 4. weeks ago, 8 trunks of books and some other packages for Monticello, & that when they arrive they must be put away in the...
One half of the sheet iron for the offices was shipped from Philadelphia Sep. 23. The pig lead was shipped thence Nov. 7. and the remaining half of the sheet iron was shipped Dec. 1.   this last half is said to be thinner than the former, consequently should be used separately, so that whichever goes first to decay, may leave the other part wholly good. but the season is now too far advanced...
I recieved yesterday yours of the 11th. I wrote to mr Oldham on the 12th. of October for mahogany for the tables, & took for granted it was gone on but as I have not heard from him I will write again to-day, as to that as well as the additional quantity you want. I was in hopes that Abram could have hewed locust as fast as Lewis could turn it, but if he cannot, let mr Perry supply it as I...
I do not know whether mr Barry got here, window-glass for the Bedford sashes. will you let me know by the return of post, that I may immediately provide for it. Accept my best wishes. NCorniM .
Mahogany forwarded to Monticello by mr Oldham f I 43— 4 of St. Domingo wood. 31÷ 8 of Bay do.   1 ½ I. 75— 0 The two planks for tables measure 27. I. at one end and 26. I. at the other by 10. f. 3 I. long.   I could not possibly find any wider; & supposed this could be made to answer. it is very nice & solid. there is very little of St. Domingo wood made use of here. The 1 ½
Your letter of Jan. 30. was recieved by the last post. the Copal varnish & pullies were waiting till the river should open, to be sent by water. however I have now had a jug of 2. gallons of varnish cased in a box, and the pullies also put into a box to be forwarded by the stage. but I have little expectation that the varnish can ever arrive safe by that conveyance.   by this post I shall...
On the 18th. I sent from here to Alexandria to be forwarded by the first vessel to Richmond 8. boxes of glass, containing 200. panes 12. I. square, 300. do. 12 by 18. and 50 do. 14. by 18. by which you will percieve I have considerably enlarged the quantity called for, in order to have a supply for breakage. be so good as to tell mr Bacon of this shipment, & that on it’s arrival at Milton, the...
Your letter by the last post is recieved and I have directed the error in the glass to be corrected. but opportunities of forwarding things are now rare. a new coat of shingling is all that is wanting to the South Outchamber. for that we may prepare. Congress rose last night, I shall leave this on the 5th. of May & be at home the morning of the 8th. and will bring with me the money you desire....