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Mr. Stoddart, Secretary of the Navy having early in this month informed me by letter of his desire to resign that office, and having continued in it ever since, on my request only, I hereby authorize & appoint you to recieve the charge of the department from him, and to perform the duties of it until a Secretary of the Navy shall be formally appointed. Accept assurances of my high...
I inclose you a sheet from an anonymous letter of many sheets which I have just recieved. the letter is chiefly of the sneering kind, but among a number of gigantic measures he recommends to procure fame for myself, there is one which as it may procure public good a more legitimate object appears worthy consideration at this moment while we are about to negociate for roads through the Indian...
Colo. Smith the writer of one of the inclosed letters is the republican […] in the place of Page lately elected to Congress in Virginia. a man of very great respectability. setting that aside, our service is not so urgent as to render it necessary to drag sons from their fathers. the affection of citizens to their government is worth cultivating as it’s best support. these considerations would...
I am just making the last arrangements for my departure. the inclosed proposition of Monsr. Dupont for the purification of our Saltpetre being of some magnitude I have thought it best to forward his letter to you, that you may decide on it yourself, and give him an answer. we have nothing material from Europe except the communication from his Britannic Majesty that understanding we were...
I inclose you a letter from a mr Quarrier of this state asking a military commission. I know little of him, but that he is young, and ought to expect to be merely a commissioned officer. those who recommend him are persons of the first respectability. the abuses in the military & naval departments seem to have been so great, that it will doubtless be indispensable that we bring them in some...
I think I once before sent you an application from the same person from whom the inclosed is, with some notes on the subject of his application to me before the 4th. of March. his recollection of a promise on my word & honour , is a proof that he recollects too much with those who know me. a much greater occasion would have been requisite to draw such a pledge from me. I do not recollect the...
I inclose for your consideration a paper addressed to me from Lieutt. Landais of the Artillery, to consider & decide whether any thing & what should be done in consequence of it.—I formerly referred to your consideration the petition of John Rowe , confined in jail for having counselled or procured a souldier to desert. he was sentenced to 3. months imprisonmt. & to paiment of costs . his 3....
In my letter of the 14th. of August I inclosed you a note respecting some abuses said to have been committed in the works at Newport. tho’ I am since informed that the facts are possibly or even probably true, yet I find they were sent to me under a forged name. this may render circumspection necessary, as it certainly lessens the probability of the truth of the information. I thought it...
I have been looking into the case which is the subject of Majr. Foreman’s letter from St. Mary’s , stating that the Govr. of E. Florida proposes to enlist souldiers within our territory for an expedition against the Creeks . the statute of June 14. 1797. is only against naval enterprizes. but that of Mar. 3. 1799 regulating intercourse with the Indians, comes perfectly up to this case in...
I thank the Lord for a clear sky and bright day to hear the answer of our good Father, The President of the United States— Brother, The four Angels have directed that all the lands which have been reserved for the use of your red children, should be secured to them for their comfort so long as the sun shall shine, and this they desire may be done, by giving them separate deeds for each tract...
Strongly impressed with the sentiment that the Great Spirit is displeased with his red children for the little attention which they have paid to the preservation of their lands And having received reiterated assurances from the Government of the United States, that every injury on representation should be redressed, I beg leave to state to our good father the President, that Mr Morris in...
The Great Spirit looks down on me this day, and expects that I shall take measures to secure all the reservations to which your red children are entitled. My anxiety on this subject is encreased by a knowledge I have of the will of the Great Spirit above us all. He expects if from me, and faithfulness to him and to my red brethren compel me to be importunate in urging a completion of this very...
I thank the Lord that the day has arrived when we can settle all our business, and I thank you for the friendly manner in which it has been conducted thus far— Brother, I wish to communicate to you that our whole Nation great and small were much pleased that we were willing to come forward to our father the President, and to consult measures for the greater security and comfort of the Nation....
The guarding our arms at New London & Manchester stands on totally different ground. the former was at my request, delivered verbally to Governor Monroe about the 15th. of April 1801. certainly not a week sooner or later. the latter was in the time of the insurrection of their slaves and no more chargeable to the Union than the other expences of their militia on that occasion. I should have...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of the Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary at War & Secretary of the Navy to carry into execution the inclosed resolution of the H. of representatives of May 3. 1802. desiring a statement of expenditures from Jan. 1. 1797. by the Quarter Master Genl. the Navy agents, for the Contingencies of the Naval & Military establishments and the Navy contracts for timber &...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 7th. and entirely approve your proposition to remove the arms from New London . I suppose it would be generally a good rule to break up all the small deposits and carry them to the great magazines where they may be kept in order, guarded, & always ready. health & affectionate salutations. PrC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “Secretary at War.” Recorded in SJL...
Your favor of the 29th. came to hand yesterday, and I now return the papers it inclosed. I am in hopes the measures you have taken will enable Govr. Harrison to satisfy the Indians. I believe there is nothing new in the present circulation of lies among them. I have always understood that they are peculiarly inundated with lies at all times. that vice is practised pretty freely by themselves;...
Your two favors of July. 31. came to hand yesterday. I have no hesitation in approving of the purchase recommended by Genl. Sumpter, but I retain the papers a post longer to make myself acquainted with them. indeed the volume of my mail is such that subjects which require any consideration cannot be dispatched during the single evening & morning of the post’s stay. hence I shall generally on...
On further view and consideration of the papers from Genl. Sumpter, and Colo. Senf I continue of opinion that we ought to purchase the lands spoken of by them, about 4, or 500. acres, and further would approve of a purchase of any quantity within the limits of the act of assembly (2000 acres) considering that they must [be moderate in their] price as yet and that much will be wanting for...
I inclose you some more resignations of militia commissions. I think we should do well in all cases to know that a commission will be accepted, before [. . .]. We have recieved information that the emperor of Marocco, having asked passports for two vessels loaded with wheat to go to Tripoli while blockaded by us, and being refused, has ordered away our Consul: this demand of his is so palpably...
I inclose you more militia resignations, as also a petition of Benjamin Dame of Newington praying the discharge of his son under age enlisted in the army. this being a matter of right, and not of discretion in us, which he might effect by a Habeas Corpus, I hold it a duty that he be discharged. if I recollect rightly we did the same in a similar case on some former occasion. Accept assurances...
Your’s of the 7th. with the inclosed papers came to my hand only last night. I now return the papers with an entire approbation of your letter to Govr. Harrison & proceedings. the white people who are among the Indians, having designs of their own to answer, & no principle to restrain them, make great use of lies to effect their purposes, and fabricate them from time to time according to the...
Having had occasion to write more fully to mr Gallatin on the appointments for the customs in Massachusets as well as other places, I beg leave to refer you to that letter which I have asked him to communicate to you, & that you & he will decide definitively what is to be done. I therefore now reinclose the sheet of capt. Crowninsheild’s letter recieved from you. it does not contain any thing...
The inclosed letter from Govr. Tatnall and petition from the inhabitants over the Cherokee boundary, on a subject which Colo. Wafford had before presented to us , renders it necessary to advert again to it. I think we have had some information from our Commissioners of the unsuccessful endeavors they used, according to our instructions, to obtain indulgence for these settlers, but I do not...
Your favor of the 15th is recieved and I now return mr Bowdoin’s letter forwarded in it. his doctrine is unquestionably sound. I have enjoyed uninterrupted good health, the story of the five physicians notwithstanding. by this post I recieve the opinions of the Secretaries of the Treasury & navy as well as yours on the subject of our Barbary affairs. I had before asked & recieved that of the...
Your’s of the 22d. was recieved last night, and I now return the papers it inclosed. the exact statement of the boundary of cession by the Choctaws to the British is indeed important. I know not the character of Purcell [. . .] writer, but the minuteness of the details call for credit. I think the [spirit] of our former instructions is to be observed, but as they looked only generally [to] the...
I inclose for your consideration & to take order, a petition from the inhabitants of Cahokia, a letter from I. Darneille on behalf of those of Pioria, and a letter inclosing them from Govr. Harrison. the Poutawatamies have killed two Americans on their farms about 5. leagues above Cahokia; and altho’ the inhabitants of that place call it a declaration of war, yet from the amount of the aid...
I inclose you a letter recieved from Governor Strong on the subject of the military articles furnished us with the fort . considering that our predecessors may have engaged more fully than we suppose, and that in all cases where a state is urgent, the General government ought to exercise towards it the liberality & indulgence of a parent, I should be for yielding whatsoever was not too...
I recieved yesterday yours of the 3d. and now return the papers it covered. the treaty between New York & the Senecas I suppose is to be laid before the Senate on their meeting as well as the deed of exchange between the Senecas and the Holland land company. our approbation being the only function which belongs to us, we should go out of our line in laying the latter before the legislatures...
Your favor of the 8th. was recieved yesterday. I cannot [but consider?] the case of the French negroes at New York as substantially within the police of the state: and that [cases] of that kind will not be as well provided against by the General government as by the government of the place. our relations with it are only incidental, to wit, as it comes within the laws of contraband or...
The permission of the Emperor of Marocco to our Consul to remain for six months for the purpose of explanations, which is their way of declaring a state of peace having materially changed the state of things in the Mediterranean, I had recommended to mr Smith to stop the sailing of the John Adams. I now recieve a letter from him pressing her sailing. I had thought the thing so obvious as not...
Your favor of the 20th. is recieved. on consultation with mr Madison who came here the day after mine of the 17th. to you, he appeared so clearly to concur with mr Smith in sending the John Adams, towards which the present state of her preparation had considerable influence, that I thought it better to conclude on her departure, and so wrote to mr Smith by the post of the 20th. I had intended...
In the case of Crutchelow & John Williams , two of the murderers of the Indians who have fled, had the case happened in any of the states which proceed according to the forms of the English law, an indictment would be preferred to a grand jury, the witnesses called to appear, and on it’s being found a true bill, a capias issues, which being returned non est inventus, an Exigent goes out, on...
Hints on the subject of Indian boundaries, suggested for consideration An object, becoming now of great importance, is the establishment of a strong front on our Western boundary, the Missisipi, securing us on that side, as our front on the Atlantic does towards the East. our proceedings with the Indians should tend systematically to that object, leaving the extinguishment of title in the...
Th: Jefferson asks a consultation with the heads of departments tomorrow at 11. aclock, on the subject of N. Orleans & the Floridas. should we meet later, we may be prevented by the visits usual on the day.   will mr Smith be so good as to send the inclosed over the way to mr Lincoln? RC ( MHi : Levi Lincoln Papers); undated or date clipped; endorsed by Levi Lincoln as 31 Dec. 1802; with...
Observations on mr Hawkins’s letter of Dec. 22. 1802. Our proceedings on the subject of the deed by the Speaker of the Creeks to mrs Darant should be decisive, prompt and exemplary. if she be an Indian (which I should not expect as she is the sister of Mc.Gillivray) we cannot punish her. if she be an American citizen, the Attorney of the US. in the Missisipi territory might be instructed to...
The inclosed were sent to me by mr Bacon with permission to keep them. they may therefore be filed in the War office. as we percieve that a light French breeze has already reached most of the Indians, it will be well for us to keep our eye on all their movements. I have therefore asked the favor of mr Bacon to continue to send me this correspondence. as I have no doubt the arrival of the...
Th: Jefferson [presents] his friendly the Secretary at War and sends him the Governors Page in his office. PrC ( DLC ); faint. Recorded in SJL with notation “lres from Govr Page & Saquiricia.” Enclosures: (1) John Page to TJ, 2 Mch. 1803 . (2) “Saquiricia” to TJ, 15 Feb. 1803 (recorded in SJL as received from Windsor, North Carolina, on 16 Mch. with notation “W,” but not found). (3) probably...
I am much pleased with both the ideas suggested by Lyons , viz. 1. to proceed from Knoxville direct through the Cherokee Creek & Choctaw country to Natchez. 2. to encourage individuals to make terms with the Indians on their private account for establishing farms along the line at every 15. or 30. or 45. miles distance as can be obtained.   but instead of going from Knoxville to Natchez in a...
The dangers on the road to Natchez are really serious, & calling for attention. mere stationary posts, as proposed by Govr. Roan, appear to me inefficient. either a small body of cavalry, or mounted infantry, to be perpetually scouring the road and hovering about the caravans of passengers, as a marechaussée, seems worthy of consideration, as also the employing Indians in the same way, or...
I inclose you a letter from E. I. Dupont who has established a gunpowder manufactory at Wilmington. if the public can with advantage avail themselves of his improvements in that art, it would be to encourage improvement in one of the most essential manufactures. I should be the more gratified by it as it would gratify his father who has been a faithful & useful friend to this country. during...
It is suggested to me (indirectly from the person himself) that Jerome Bonaparte is at Baltimore under the name of Monsr. Dalbarton , with a son of Rewbell, and that they mean to ask a passage to France in one of our frigates. if this be the fact, he will have satisfied thereof the minister of his nation, thro’ whom we shall be apprised of it, and relieved from all trouble in deciding on it....
I inclose you a petition from Aaron Goff of Vermont praying the release of his son under age. the fact of infancy being established, the discharge becomes a matter of right.   I have the pleasure to inform you that William Clarke accepts with great glee the office of going with Capt Lewis up the Missouri.   in the moment of my departure from Washington mrs Madison informed me you had a thought...
I inclose you a letter from mr Jackson of Tennissee, formerly a Senator from that state on the subject of Colo. Butler. he is a man of great integrity and respectability; carried sometimes beyond strict reason by an overwarm and excellent heart. another from judge Campbell on the subject of Doctr. Vandyke. I also return the one from him to you covering mine. on the subject of the robbery...
About a twelvemonth after we came into the administration we learnt by a letter from mr Simpson that our predecessors had promised to the Emperor of Marocco 100. gun carriages. you have known most of the unlucky circumstances which have baffled our execution of it. the last however is but recently known. we had desired mr Simpson to have them made in Europe, or to offer the value to the...
I now return you the proceedings of the courtmartial held at Fort Jay with an approbation of the sentence against Lt. Van Renslaer, & a remission of the corporal punishment of Ferguson & Rush as you advised.   I am sensible of the risque we run in returning to Washington before the commencement of the [frost?] but the collection & copying of documents & other preparations for the meeting of...
Will General Dearborne be so good as to recommend some person? or will it be better for him to retain the papers & consult the republican members from Maine ? [ Note by TJ :] Dudley Broadstreet Hobart of Gardener recommended by Genl. Dearborne, who candidly states that he is his son in law, but the applicn is from many respectable persons of the neighborhood, & the only competiton is a young...
I am very much pleased to find that the Choctaws agree to sell us their country on the Missisipi, and think we ought to accept it to any extent they will agree to, only taking care the price be not too high. they are poor; and will probably sell beyond what will pay their debts, so as to be entitled to an annual pension, which is one of the best holds we can have on them. their strength & the...
It is represented to me on the part of a person of the name of Solomon Sessum living at Tarburgh in N. Caroline, in independant circumstances, but himself & wife both old, that Roderick Sessums their son was, in the year 1795, during a fit of intoxication, enlisted by a Captn. Rickard then recruiting in that quarter. that being at Natchez in 1800, when his time was to expire, the father with...
Considering that we have shortly to ask a favour ourselves from the Creeks, the Tuckabatché road, may we not turn the application of Hawkins to our advantage, by making it the occasion of broaching that subject to them? he might be directed to say to them that we furnish with pleasure the several articles which he has asked for their use: that there is nothing we have more at heart than to...