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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Dearborn, Henry" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Mr. Gallatin having requested that letters might be written to the Governors for militia aid to his Collectors, I, without reflection, wrote the inclosed in my own name. but on consideration it seems more proper that it should go from yourself. the ideas I had expressed are those I supposed proper, you will make such alterations as you may think better. in general it may be easily accomodated...
I suppose that in answering Govr. Drayton we should compliment his ardor, & smooth over our non-compliance with his request; that he might be told that the President sees, in his present application a proof of his vigilance & zeal in whatever concerns the public safety, and will count with the more confidence on his future attentions & energy whenever circumstances shall call for them. that he...
I have read with pleasure the letter of Capt Davidson by which, according to unanimous resolves of the company of light infantry of the first legion of the militia of Columbi a commanded by him, he tenders their services as volunteers under the act of Congress of Feb. 24. 1807 I accept the offer and render to Capt. Davidson & the other officers & privates of the company that praise to which...
Will you be so good as to consider the inclosed answer to the Little Turtle, & suggest any necessary alterations, & return it to me.—I believe you have not returned me the rough draught for the Beaver. if the copies can be made out tomorrow, we may meet the Indians the next day. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have prepared the two principal answers to the Indians, & pray you to read them attentively & to suggest any alterations you would advise. in that to the Poughtewatamy, it is difficult to go exactly as far in restraining him as we can without committing ourselves absolutely to oppose force, which we must not do. I do not think I yet understand sufficiently the evidence against the claim of...
I shall be ready to recieve any of the Indians tomorrow. I send you a sketch of the answer I propose to the Chippoway, for correction. I suppose he will deliver his speech in his own tongue, and that I may give the answer at the same time, if he introduces no new matter. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose you a charge by mr Hanson against Capt Smith & Lieutenants Davis & Dobbins of the militia, as having become members of an organized company, calling themselves the Tar-company, avowing their object to be the tarring & feathering citizens of some description. altho in ordinary cases the animadversions of the law may be properly relied on to prevent what is unlawful, yet with those...
Th: Jefferson requests the favor of Genl: & Mrs. Dearborn & Mr. Wingate to dine with him on Monday the 17th: at half after three, The favor of an answer is asked. Privately owned.
Extract of a letter from Mr. John Sibley dated Natchitoches Octr. 12. 1808. Every thing in this quarter is quiet. the Season is healthy and very great crops of every thing. No occurrence amongst the Indians worthy of notice. Every body wishes the Embargo raised; but not untill the object for which it was layed is affected; or it is found insufficient to affect it. The late events in Spain seem...
The inclosed papers were recd. at Monticello, a little before I left it & were put by to be communicated to you here; but were in fact left there by mistake. I have just recieved & now communicate them. Affectte. salutns. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
Genl. Dearborne be so good as to read the inclosed and decide on what is best, returning the papers to mr Gallatin with whom it may be useful perhaps for him to confer PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
I inclose for your consideration several applications for military commissions. the recommendations of Doctr. Macaulay are very strong. he called on me, and one cannot help being influenced somewhat by the appearance of a man. he is quite a well looking subject, but not too much so for a Captain . altho’ a majority is mentioned, I presume less will be accepted. There is no man in South...
Yours of Aug. 18. is this moment recieved, & I forward you a letter of July 16. from Govr. Lewis from which you will percieve that the cloud between us, the Iowas, Foxes & Sacs is cleared up. he says nothing of the Osages; but I presume their enemies have taken advantage of the withdrawing our protection from them. should you not have issued orders for the 100,000 men, I believe it may rest...
Yours of Aug. 15. was recieved yesterday. I regret extremely that the estimate of the blocks at N. York should place them above our appropriation. the data of calculation should be above all question to justify suspending the operation. but, if they are to cost a million, altho’ I should be for it, yet Congress should be consulted.   I inclose you a letter from George Mosley wishing to be a...
In my letter of yesterday I omitted to inclose that of Hern, which I now do. I add to it a newspaper from St. Louis, in which is an account of the surrender of some Indian murderers. this paper says there were 3. or 4. whites murdered, but I think Govr. Lewis’s letter says but 1. on that ground I wrote to him to recommend, if they should be convicted, to suffer only one to be executed, unless...
In my letter of the 15th. I informed you that I had authorised Govr. Tompkins to order out such aids of militia on lake Ontario & the Canada line as he should find necessary to enforce the embargo, not exceeding 500. he proposing to repair thither himself to select trusty persons. I am now to request that you will have measures taken for their pay, subsistence & whatever else is requisite. I...
I inclose you a letter of July 1. from Govr. Lewis recieved from the war office by the last post. It presents a full, & not a pleasant view of our Indian affairs West of the Misipi. as the punishment of the Osages has been thought necessary, the means employed appear judicious. first to draw off the friendly part of the nation, & then withdrawing the protection of the US. leave the other...
I inclose you letters from McLure & Keteltas, asking military appointment, also one recieved from your office from Govr. Hull. official information of continued acts of forcible & insurrectionary opposition to the embargo law on the Canada line, & a letter to that effect from Govr. Tomkins, have obliged me to authorise him to call out detachments of his militia. as he will go to the spot...
Yours of July 27. has been recieved. I now inclose you the letters of Hawkins, Harrison, Wells, Hull & Claiborne recieved from the war office, and, as I conjecture, not yet seen by you. Indian appearances, both in the North West & South are well. beyond the Missisipi they are not so favorable. I fear Governor Lewis has been too prompt in committing us with the Osages so far as to oblige us to...
Yours of July 27. is recieved. It confirms the accounts we recieve from others that the infractions of the embargo in Maine & Massachusets are. open. I have removed Pope of New Bedford for worse than negligence. the Collector of Sullivan is on the totter. the Tories of Boston openly threaten insurrection if their importation of flour is stopped. the next post will stop it. I fear your governor...
A complaint has come to me indirectly on the part of the Cadets at West point, that the promotions in their corps are made on other principles than those of seniority or merit. they do not charge Colo. Williams with an unjust selection by himself, but with leaving the selection to his lieutenant, whose declaration that it was so left to him, they say can be proved. it is stated particularly...
I inclose you a letter from the Path-killer & others of the Cherokees, the object of which I do not precisely see. I suppose they are of Van’s party. the sentiments are unquestionably those of a white man. Sibley’s letters present a disagreeable view. it will be troublesome if we are once compelled to use acts of force against those people. it is the more difficult as we should have to pursue...
I send you a recommendation from the Senate of Georgia in favor of a David Alexander to be a brigade inspector or adjutant General. the writer signs himself President pro tem of the Senate of Georgia, & sais it is a concurred resolution of their General assembly & under the injunction of secrecy. the channel of recommendation is novel, & not to be approved as an habitual one; yet out of...
Th: Jefferson incloses to Genl. Dearborne a letter to be noticed or not as he thinks proper, with his affectionate salutations. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
The enclosed papers will explain to you the motives of this address—I deemed it improper to say any thing of my Accounts, while the opinion of the Court of Enquiry was unknown—This was not published before the 4th July, since which I have, with exception of three or four Days, been confined to my Room, and thus it happened I could not see you before your departure The first day I was able to...
I had written to Governor Claiborne according to what had been agreed between you & myself after which I recieved a letter from Pitot on behalf of the canal company of NO. which should have accompanied the printed report I communicated to you. the letter agrees with the report and asks specifically that we should either lend them 50,000. D. or buy the remaining fourth part of their shares now...
Could you, through any friend at Boston or elsewhere have a kental of good-dumbfish forwarded for me to Messrs. Gibson & Jefferson of Richmond, with as little delay as possible, as it is for use on my return to Monticello? it would oblige me much. mr Crownenshield used to do me that kindness. affectionate salutations [ Reply by Dearborn :] Sir, I have written to a gentleman in Boston, who will...
Th: Jefferson, with his affectionate salutations to Genl. Dearborne, incloses him the application of a mr Blount for military appointment, to take it’s stand among competitors in cases of resignation. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose you information from Genl. Jackson which I presume you have otherwise recieved of an outrage committed by the Creeks. altho’ Hawkins will probably give us an account of it yet I presume you will think it necessary to make enquiries of him respecting it. as I shall leave this in 10. or 12. days for Washington, I have desired that no more letters may be forwarded from the post office...
There is a subject on which I wished to speak with you before I left Washington; but an apt occasion did not occur. it is that of your continuance in office. perhaps it is as well to submit my thoughts to you by letter. the present summer is too important, in point of preparation, to leave your department unfilled, for any time, as I once thought might be done: and it would be with extreme...