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I Send you A few Lines to Enform you That I have Receivd, A letter from My Mother the 20 of May 1806 Enforming Me that All the Fammily of Your Late Deceased Brother Is Well at present And I hope that these few Lines Will find You the Same. I also Enform you that After the Death of My father I was Oblidgd to Come to this Cuntry for to Git My Living and I find it Very hard to do that here—I...
I hope you’ll be so good as to excuse the liberty of my troubling you with a Letter on a Subject which concerns me in the most Particular manner. I was Married in the Year 1780 to a Mr: Summer Adams, a Native of America (Who’s Father was a Merchant in Boston Named Jno. Adams) by whom I had three Sons who are all liveing the Eldest is in Labrador. My Husband was taken about Eleven Years Since...
I beg leave to represent to you the following account of your Brother Summer Adams , my late husband, and hope at the same time you will pardon my freedom.—he being a young Man at the time he left America, was taken prisoner, and was obliged to serve in His Majesty’s Service, under Sir Digby Dent & in the Repulse Captain Dumarie, during the years 1780.–81 & 82. ‘till the Peace, when he...
Having a considerable time since took the liberty of addressing you, being the Widow of your late Brother Summers, of whom I gave the particulars of, stating that by his Death I was left with three Children to maintain by my labour, which thanks be to God I have hitherto done.— Therefore Sir, having an opportunity per favor of the Bearer Captain Philip De Gruchy of this Island, who has known...
Impressed with a sense of your condescension, in permitting me to prefix your name to a second edition of this work, I am ambitious, that the present should make its public appearance under the same dignified and respectable patronage. I am the rather induced to avail myself a second time of the honour, which your name hath conferred on my Compendium, since your important talents and...
Before I proceed to remark upon the particular causes alledged by the citizen Hauterive in his book upon the State of France at the end of the 8th: year, as having disorganized the public law of Europe, it is proper to observe, that one of the greatest apparent purposes of the work, is to hold out a lure of temptation to the Austrian cabinet . To superficial observation, this may appear to...
We have seen in examining the first chapter of the volume “upon the state of France at the end of the 8th: year”—that the author’s object there was to prove, that at the breaking out of the french revolution, there existed no public law in Europe, & we have alledged the grounds upon which we consider him as having failed in the proof of this proposition. The second chapter is entitled “general...
We have this day a bill introduced to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—presented by Mr: Wright—It has pass’d to a second reading, and if it do not pass the Senate at the third, it will fail by a very small majority. A bill pass’d at the second reading, for the next Session of Congress to commence on the first Monday of November. The business of Congress is growing languid...
I enclose you a letter, which I received last Monday, and by which you will learn the distressing misfortune which has befallen me—I have not communicated it to you before, from the wish that it might not come to the knowledge of my brother’s wife, at a moment when it might too much affect her—I have another letter from Washington, one day later than the one enclosed; my wife was then as well...
My last letter to you, was of November 25. since which I have not enjoyed the pleasure of receiving a line either from my mother or from you—To her I have in the interval written once; and now enclose a press copy of the letter, in case the original should fail in the conveyance. My numerous letters to the Secretary of State, and to my brother will I hope apologize for my silence during so...
I received a few days since your very kind letter which I am ashamed of answering by a few lines; but by some accident I have fallen from a state of almost total idleness into an overwhelming flood of business, which leaves me scarcely a quarter of an hour of the day or of the Night—I sent you last week a copy of a volume in the form of a bill which I reported upon the Aggression business and...
I send you by this opportunity a french pamphlet entitled “ Bacon , as he is ; or denunciation of a french translation of his works, published at Dijon by Mr Ant. La Selle—by J. A. De Luc—Reader to the Queen of G. Britain, Fellow of the royal Societies of London & Dublin, member of the Society of naturalists at Berlin, of that of mineralogy at Jena & of several others—Professor of Philosophy...
I have now two letters from you, and one from my mother, which ought to be answered more particularly, than my time will admit—The business of the Session has been delayed, untill such an accumulation has taken place, as will very much hurry the close of our Time—And although I might perhaps without injury to the public, suffer the business to be done without taking much trouble about it...
I have received your kind favour of the 6th: instt: and shall be careful to enclose the more important documents which may be printed from Time to Time— I hope my dear Mother has ere this entirely recovered from her illness. I had a letter from Mr: Shaw, one day later than your’s, in which he gives me a yet more flattering hope of her being on the recovery. Although the more my brother’s...
Mr: Welsh proposes to return home by the way of Amsterdam, and will be the bearer of this letter—With it, I enclose the 4th: number of the Gazette, and copies of former letters to yourself and to my dear mother. I wish I could promise myself a more speedy departure than that which I anticipated in my last letter to you; but we can no longer form a hope of my wife’s immediate recovery—There is...
Your favour of the 14th: instt: came to my hands just at a moment to renew and to strengthen impressions which had been weighing heavily upon my mind for near a month—The general questions relative to the powers and the process of expulsion under our Constitution had been forced upon me by the situation in which I was placed as Chairman of the Committee on the present Inquiry—My own...
The bill to protect foreign seamen, has been again debated this day, and various alterations in it made—It is less obnoxious than at first, but still contains mischief enough to produce very ill consequences—Duane made his appearance this day to report the debate—The first time for many weeks; indeed I believe the first time since the debate on the Amendment to the Constitution. No other...
I continue as long as possible to send you my gazette; but I now hope in the course of three weeks to leave Berlin—I have written to engage a passage for myself and family, on board the Catherine, Captain Ingersoll; from Hamburg for New–York. No opportunity for Boston occurs from that place; nor do I know of any from Bremen or either of the dutch ports—Besides which the journey from New–York...
I have very much regretted, my dear Sir, that the severity of the Season has deprived us of the pleasure of spending the Sunday with you for so many weeks; but it affords me some consolation that you have found so agreeable a companion in La Harpe, whose work I was well assured would prove a great source of entertainment to you—The volumes containing his account of the philosophy of the 18th:...
No. I. 28th March 1801 Publication Date 6 June 1801 Dear Sir, I send you by this opportunity a French pamphlet, entitled, “ Bacon As He Is ; or, Denunciation of a French Translation of his Works, published at Dijon, by M. Ant. La Salle—By I. A. De Luc, Reader to the Queen of Great-Britain; Fellow of the Royal Societies, of London and Dublin; Member of the Society of Naturalists, at Berlin; of...
During the last days of the Session of Congress which has just expired, I found it impossible to continue the correspondence which I had previously maintained even so far as to enclose from day to day the public documents as they were printed—From 10 O’Clock in the morning untill 7 in the Evening the Senate was constantly in Session, with the interval of only half an hour each day for a slight...
I have already written you a very long letter in answer to your favour of the 8th: instt:—and after writing it, upon reading it over concluded the best disposition I could make of it would be to burn it—Accordingly the flames have consumed it, and I must begin again. Your answers and observations upon my inquiries respecting the impressment of our seamen by the British are of the highest...
The enclosed letter being from Mr: King, I apprehended might enclose one to me, from the gentlemen at Amsterdam; as I had forwarded letters upon your affairs through him to them—I therefore took the liberty of breaking the seal—But finding only open papers within, I now enclose the whole to you—I have not presumed to look into the contents. Yours faithfully MHi : Adams Papers.
As I am informed there is a vessel soon to sail from Amsterdam for Boston I now forward to Mr. Bourne to go by her, this letter enclosing copies of my numbers 2 and 3. upon the Etat de la France &c. The book itself will go with the copy of my first letter concerning it, from Hamburg—Hauterive has generally been given out as its author; but Talleyrand himself is now understood to have had the...
In my last Letter I observed to you, that the form of putting the final question on the Articles of Impeachment against Judge Chase, was varied from that which had been adopted in the case of Mr: Pickering, and made conformable to the English Precedents—To shew you how essentially this variation of form was connected with a most essential important question as to the nature of Impeachment...
I received together last Evening your two favours of 30th: ulto: and 2d: instt: for which I most sincerely return you my thanks.—In the dreary path which I am now compell’d to tread, it is cheering to the Spirits, and gives the most pleasing consolation to have occasionally the benefit of your correspondence.—What the issue of the election in Massachusetts, will be on the harmony of the ruling...
I have two letters from you which ought to have been answered some time since, but I have only one apology for the delay, which I have so often mentioned that I am almost ashamed to repeat it. I have no time for writing except when the Senate is in Session, and when such business is before them, as I can suffer to proceed without paying much attention to it.—We have now come to sit on...
The third chapter of the book upon the State of France, concerns the relative situation of France, with regard to her allies. It begins with a magnificent eulogium upon that country, for her great exertions in former ages against the domineering ambition of the court of Rome, of the Venetian Republic, and of the house of Austria successively. There can be no doubt, but that the efforts of...
Since writing the within letter, I have seen Coll. Smith, who informs me that my Sister will probably have left you before this arrives—So I shall direct the whole to you. My wife has so far recovered that we think of going on this day as far as Elizabeth Town, and hope to proceed further on our journey to-morrow. But She is still so weak, that I am not a little apprehensive on her account—...
When I expressed a wish in writing to my brother, that you should purposely dismiss some part of that attention to the present course of public affairs, which I thought contributed much to make your hours unpleasant, I was not aware that your expectations of change in the politics of a considerable portion of the States, more favourable to the real interests, and morals of the Country, were so...
I have received, and communicated to this Government, my recall from the mission here—I shall hasten my departure as much as possible; but the situation of my wife who is still confined to her bed, renders it uncertain when she will be able to travel at all, and yet more when to undertake the voyage. If a favourable opportunity from Hamburg for Boston occurs I shall give it the preference—But...
I received some days since your kind favour containing the account of your occupations and amusements; and I have this day that of my brother dated at the close of the last and commencement of the present year—I have occasionally forwarded such public documents to you, as I supposed would be worthy of your perusal, together with the Journals of the two Houses—That of the Senate will I hope...
I wrote you a few lines from New-York, enclosing a copy of Commodore Morris’s Defence, for Mr: Shaw—The day after which I left that City and came on multum jactatus mare et terris—to Philadelphia in the Land Stage, and thence to Baltimore by the way of Newcastle and Frenchtown; chiefly by water—a mode of conveyance to me much more agreeable than that of a Stage Coach over the chaotic roads on...
It is my intention during the short time that I expect to remain here, to send you from time to time such new publications in the french language, as may fall in my way, and appear to promise entertainment or matter of interesting meditation for you. With this design I purpose to combine another, which I am at least desirous to render of some utility to my Country.—The translation from Journal...
This prohibition of the admission of slaves into Louisiana, is like the drawing of a jaw tooth—We have expedient after expedient introduced to answer this purpose—Breckenridge has at last concentrated all his wisdom on the subject in the Amendment, which I now inclose you. This is a tolerably good device to reconcile the two parties of slave and anti-slave into which the majority are divided....
I have already sent you, one, or two specimens of translations from the German fabulist Gellert . I shall perhaps occasionally send you a few more, with the intention of giving you some idea of his character and merit, as a writer of fables. This cannot indeed be done in any other than a very imperfect manner, to those, who do not understand his own language. There is a mixture of archness &...
You will find, in the multitude of public documents, which I constantly transmit to you, the only apology I have to offer, for the irregularity which has crept upon the returns to your most valuable letters—Though I find it utterly impossible even to read all these papers, yet I feel it an indispensible duty to peruse with attention the greater part of them, and some of them require even a...
Since the date of your favour of the 29th: ulto: you have doubtless received many additional documents confirming your opinion of the system of policy prevalent here in relation to our foreign affairs—Unqualified submission to France, and unqualified defiance of Great Britain, are indeed the two pillars upon which our measures are to rest—And numerous as the proofs are which you will have of...
The foreign Seamen Law, was yesterday postponed to the first Monday in December.—yeas 21. nays 11.—I was not present at the vote having been obliged to attend the Supreme Court, to argue my second Cause before them—This I began yesterday, and finished this morning. Mr: L. Martin of Baltimore is at this moment occupied as the scissars of my arguments —(You know where this comes from.)—I have...
I enclosed under a blank cover to you a copy of the President’s Message, on the day when it was delivered, and having now to enclose a letter from my wife to my Mother, and a bill which has already pass’d both houses of Congress I cannot forbear writing a line with it, to recall myself to your kind remembrance. You will perceive that the message is in a style and tone which have not been...
The gazette , of which you will find the first number enclosed, is intended to give you a concise & comprehensive view of the principal occurences in every part of Europe—My project is during the remainder of my stay here, to send you twice a month a similar sheet, comprizing a period of the same length of time. It will perhaps seldom give you news , but it will concentrate information, which...
I have been happy to receive your obliging favour of the 14th: instt: and am much obliged to you for your opinions respecting the points of maritime Law, which require our attention at this Time—A coincidence of your opinion with that of the President of the United States, would be more than enough to stagger me in any point upon which I should have formed a different one—It makes me therefore...
You will remember, that in the year 1793, while the government of the french republic was in the hands of Robertspiere, a collection of papers, found among those of Louis the sixteenth was published under the title of Politics of all the cabinets of Europe . The most important of these papers, and that from which the title was given to the whole collection, was a work written by Mr. Favier, a...
The Fire and Marine Insurance Office are now repaying the third part of their capital, to which they were authorized by an Act of the Legislature; and issuing new Certificates to the Stockholders—The old Certificates must therefore be returned into the Office—I will thank you to send me, by the earliest opportunity, your Certificate for the forty shares, which stand in my name, but of which...
I received nearly ten days since your very kind letter, which has hitherto remained unanswered owing to the very sudden transition we made, from almost total idleness, to an excessive press of business—This transition was introduced by a question upon the building of a bridge , which has already made five days of debate, and upon which the question is not yet finally taken—Besides this Mr:...
I enclose herewith the second number of my Gazette, which completes the Journal for the month of March. By the last post I sent to Hamburg a letter for my mother, with the information that on the 12th: inst. my wife was delivered of a son. But she was then extremely ill, & I wrote under the impression of great alarm on her account. She has since very much recovered, & as I am assured quite out...
You will see by the folio sheet I inclose to you, that the House of Representatives have not yet done with the Government of Louisiana.—The fourth Section is the only one in which there seems much difficulty to the Legislators of the day—Many attempts were made to vary that here, and they are renewed in the House—They sport with Louisiana, as a Cat sports with a mouse—But to help our...
A letter is now reading from Captain Bainbridge, with an account of the loss of the frigate Philadelphia, wreck’d on rocks on the coast of Tripoli—the last week in October—They were in pursuit of a Tripolitan Cruizer, and struck on rocks, not laid down in any Chart they had on board —Captain Bainbridge and 307 men, are prisoners in Tripoli—I have already seen an account of this misfortune in...
After a passage of 58 days from Hamburg we have this day landed here, where we purpose to stay five or six days—My wife will then go to spend a few weeks with her parents at Washington, and I shall hasten towards Quincy where I hope within three weeks to present myself before you—Her health though yet very infirm is better than we could have expected, and your little Grandson is as hearty as...
The House in Which Mr. Brisler Lives With the Two Barns and Other Small Buildings and About fifty acres of Land Apprized by the Subscriber @ $3000 House in Which Mr. Whitney with the barn N and ten Acres of Land } 2000 Old house and forty Eight acres of Land formaly William Vesey } 1500 Six Acres of Land formally Cor Quincy @ 700 The Place formally Decn. Belcher Twenty four acres 2250 Fifteen...