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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Within the course of the last week, I have had the pleasure to receive your favors of the 20th: 27th: & 30th: of December, number’s 19-20-21. of the Series, which wants only No 18 to be complete. The interest, which your letters never fail to excite, has been abundantly testified by the eagerness, with which subscriptions to the Port folio, have been sent forward, from every part of the...
Your Letter of march the 10th is before me; your Brother informs me that he has one of April. It is true my dear Son, that I have read with much interest, and Sincere pleasure, your Letters to your Brother Thomas, and with many others, have been highly entertaind with your journey into Silicia. Whilst those letters convey usefull information, to the Merchant, the Mechanic, and the Farmer, they...
I have just received from the Department of State your favor of February 24th: enclosing No 26. of the series. My last number, goes by duplicate to England, under cover to Mr: King; with that, you will receive a particular acknowledgment of all the letters received from you, for three months past, and I cannot but hope, that you may find one of the copies, either at Hamburg or in London, prior...
The 11th. of September is reckoned among the happiest days of my Life. The Navy Officers who composed the late Court Martial on Capt. Little came out to visit me, with Mr Shaw who brought me your favor of the 4th dated at Philadelphia, informing me of your arrival on that day with my Daughter and Grandson in as good health as could be expected—You do not expressly say whether you intend to...
Welcome, welcome, my dear Son to your native Land after a seven years absence from it. God be praised that you and Louissa, and my dear John George &c have arrived in Safety, but I have trembled for you, least the extreem Heat you must have experienced Since your arrival should be too much for you all. The Sudden change we have experienced of no less than 30 degrees, is equally trying to weak...
I was so much fatigued from my journey that I found it impossible to write by Whitcomb he will tell you how very much the poor baby suffered and I hope it will be an inducement for you to come and fetch us as I really feel that George will be almost too great a charge for me alone he has quite recovered his fatigue and looks as well as ever the meeting with my friends was almost too much for...
I should have answered your very affectionate letter by this days post had I not been confined by one of my fits of the cramps &c. which owing to the fatigue of my journey and the unusual agitation of my spirits was attended with a considerable degree of fever I am however much better today and should be perfectly well if it was not for my hands which are extremely painful it is a return of...
I wait with the utmost impatience for a letter from you as I am extremely anxious to hear of your safe arrival and likewise to know something about your future plans as it regards my return home I have recieved a very polite invitation from your mother to Quincey but as I am very desirous of bringing one of my sisters home with me I have hesitated about the answer I will candidly own to you...
I recieved your very kind letter late last night and hasten to answer it although I have already written by this post. You need be under no apprehension about your dear Boy as it is impossible for a child to be in better health and the terrible eruption proved to be nothing more than bug bites he has taken his weaning like a little hero and continues to grow very stout and hearty I talk to him...
I write you a few lines merely to mention that George is perfectly well and that I am almost tired of our seperation and extremely anxious to see you. I must draw upon you for the sum of twenty dollars as I have been obliged to purchace mourning on account of the death of Mrs. Hellen the Mother of Nancy’s husband the family all very anxious to see you papas not at all well. Adieu believe me /...