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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Thomas Boylston" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I received yesterday your cover dated the 30th: ult: enclosing a packet for our friend Oldschool, which made his heart right glad, and he begs a further supply, which may be addressed to him directly, or under cover to me, until I inform you of my determination to evacuate this place. I am to Set out tomorrow morning for the little excursion, which I mentioned to you in my last, and in my...
Supposing that you will be at Washington long enough to receive a letter from this place before your departure I shall venture to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 19th: ult: to inform you of the health of both your children, as also of your friends at Quincy, who are looking with pleasure for your return, and who hope the cause of your leaving your wife behind you will terminate in...
I received, at Norristown, while attending a County Court, your favor of the 25th: ult: with an enclosure for Old-school, which is already delivered to him. He is thankful for it, as well as for the translation of Bülow, which you will perceive he has begun to publish. The concluding sentence of the Editor’s introduction will excite your smile, as being the first instance, wherein he has...
Since I am embarked in a very doubtful speculation, and I am ready to own, that I am by no means sanguine as to its success, yet as I am assured of your good will and best wishes towards the promotion of our interest, you must also indulge me in one request I have to make, which is to leave off croaking , which you know I never could endure, not because I could not appretiate the use and the...
I do not intend to write you very often, though I find it impossible to refrain altogether. Your last is of the 10th: instt: but a subsequent enclosure has been received, which gave great joy to our trusty and well-beloved O. liver O. ldschool A second sheet is wished, before the publication commences, lest the thread should be broken. As yet you will not expect any very brilliant account of...
I have your favor of the 11th: informing me of your having sent me the Massachusetts laws & the translation from Bülow. also that you are a Suffolk Senator; whereupon I tender my congratulations. The feds’ will be glad to use your name and talents, so long as they can give them a lift; I am willing however to give them the credit of intending you a compliment, on this occasion; the triumph is...
I received to day your favor of the 7th: inst: covering the journal & Speech not spoken—since which I have had no time to read either—Parson Bentley’s promotion is to me by no means unaccountable—I heard something, by going to Salem so often last winter—If you like to hear a very familiar conversation between a frail mortal and infinite wisdom, listen to the prayers of this “no God or twenty...
I have just now received your favor of the 28th. ult. with the enclosures; Dennie stepp’d in a moment after, and I gave him the fables, for which he thanks you. He desires me to add, that as he cannot expect, from your present, unsettled State, you will have much time to bestow in producing original matter, he will be grateful for any thing you may send him, from your stock on hand. I was...
I received yesterday your favor of the 7th: instant in which you request information, respecting the claim of Mr. Engel against Jacob Mark & Co. of New York. I have already stated to you the circumstances in which the affairs of the house of Messrs. Marks were involved at the time I received Mr. Engel’s papers, and I employed Mr. S. B. Malcom of New York to investigate, as far as he was able,...
I duly received your favor of the 8th. inst. with the two last sheets of the Review. Your suggestion respecting the life of Florian came too late, as the paper was already put to press. I do not however think the circumstance of much consequence, since at almost any distance, of time the person, who opened the letter, might recollect when he saw it in print, when & how & where he had seen it...