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It was with regret, that I left Boston without seeing you again, but we were in such a state of uncertainty, till it was tame to take our departer, that it was not in my power. I am extremely sorry to hear by Mrs Cushing that you was very unwell, when she left you; but hope that you are quite recovered; by this, & that you will enjoy the society of your friends and neighbours this winter,...
I was in hopes ere this time of having the satisfaction of seeing you here, but from what I could learn from Dr Bourn of Barnstable, who spoke with the President last week, it is to be feared that your unfortunate fall has occasioned a much longer confinement than we flattered ourselves it would. I have several times been determined that another week should not pass without my writing, but my...
Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
Though your last Letter was not immediately answered, I offer no apology but my own frequent infirmity. It was, my dear Mrs Adams, a very pleasant circumstance to me, to receive an account from your own hand, of your appreciated health, nor did I find in your late letter, any marks of the shattered condition of your head, of which you complain.—Indeed, I think the bough that bends to the gale,...
It has been many weeks since I have heard from you; I hope you have enjoyed health. Our Winter has been very temperate, so warm that we could have no sleighing, & great dificulty the people have had to transport the produce of their rich Farms—I pitied their Cattle, more than their Masters for many broke their Limbs, & died. I mended a Shirt and several things for Cousin William and John which...
We have been under the necessity of delaying our journey a few days on account of the marriage of Harriet which took place on thursday evening at eight o’clock since which I have been so much engaged with company and preparations for my departure It has not been in my power to write you untill this morning—We propose leaving this place on Tuesday morning and shall probably reach Quincy in...
I have just received your affectionate letter of the 15th:— and do not a moment delay to answer your question— I did attend the meeting of members at the Capitol on the 23d: of last Month— but not without invitation— I received the same invitation, which was given to the other members— And besides that I was also personally urged to attend, by another member of the Senate— I did not attend...
By the last mail, I had the honour, and the pleasure, to receive your most acceptable letter—To be indeed remembered by you, and with so much distinction, was what I had rather hoped , than expected. Yet it was an hope, so flattering to my pride, and so grateful to some better feelings, that it had been fondly cherish’d, and had served to brighten many of the hours since we parted. I was made...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. my charities to Callender are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796. I was told in Philadelphia that Callender, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
We came to the City on the 4th The weather & roads were as favorable as could be expected for the season. At New-York we had the pleasure to hear from Mrs Smith, that your health was much better than when we were at Quincey. Judge Cranch was so good as to engage us lodgings; they are as agreeable as any here, although not so pleasant to us as the last winter. I have been twice to see Mrs...
I wrote a line to my father, from New-York, enclosing a letter for Mr: Shaw, and informing you of our safe arrival thus far, upon our Journey.—We stopp’d at New-York two days, and then proceeded with as much expedition as we found practicable, untill we reached Baltimore. We stopp’d only one Night at Philadelphia, and had no opportunity to visit any of our acquaintance there—We came on in the...
The enclosed publications should have been sent by your Son. The Account of Christr: Ludwick was written to fulfil an Old promise made many years ago, in case I should survive him. You will feel the patriotic Sentiments uttered by him. To the present calculating generation, they appear fanatical, and unintelligible.— I send you the Account of the successful use of Mercury in the Consumption,...
I am almost asham’d to acknowledge how long it has been since I wrote you last, and can only hope you will consider my numerous letters to my brother, most of which I intended as much for you as for him, to be a sufficient apology—I have not received a line from you or from my father since last June, though I think it impossible but that you should have written more than once—My last letter to...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. My charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796, I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
I received your Kind letter of the 8th. inst. and was extremely sorry to hear of the indisposition of the President and your Son Your own health is I trust considerably mended and that you will soon be enabled to return to your usual avocations I am sorry to repeat what I said in my last regarding Mr. Adams’s health I have not it continues very bad and I am very apprehensive it will end in a...
My brother enclosed me Alibone’s bill for flour sent to you, & about which you wrote to me. I will pay it and send you a receipt, very soon. You enquired in one of your last letters, who is Mr. Hemphill that so much distinguished himself by his speech on the judiciary law? He is a young man, from the County of Chester, who was bred to the bar, studied in the Country and until sent to Congress,...
Indolence shall no longer prevent my acknowledging, the pleasure I felt (my dear Mrs. Adams) from your kind & affectionate letter which I received some time ago. Your sentiments on the subject of friends are so congenial with my own, that I wish by every means in my power, to cherish with the warmest affection, the few that are spared to me. The last respects were paid to our friend Mrs...
The first thing I look for in all the letters I receive from Quincy, is that which relates to our children, who cannot speak for themselves, and both of whom we left indisposed, and when I find that they are well, I feel myself relieved thus far, and only hope that the rest of the letter may contain information equally pleasing, of all the other persons in whose welfare I am so deeply...
I have received your favors of the 18th. ult: and 2d. instant, the latter enclosing a valuable communication from my father; for which please to express my thanks. I have taken note of those “thoughts on the times,” and will make use of them. I hope Mr. Ames , will continue to expand his thoughts on those topics. The Port Folio begins to get into Some favor all over the Country, and the...
Our city has sustained a very great loss in the death of Dr. Bailey. As health officer, he was obliged to reside upon Staten Island, to which the sick from the vessels that came in were carried, and the hospitals have been crowded all summer with the Irish emigrants; he has taken the fever from them, and was only ill four or five days. He has not left his equal as a physician most certainly in...
As the vacation draws near—and consequently the time to settle who are to form our family for the winter Term, I wish to know whether you intend Susan shall stay—I am resolved to keep no other so young—but her Abilities are so good and her constitution so firm, that it will be a pleasure to have her with us if you wish it—She will then have a double advantage as she will be with the older...
Your favor of the 22d: inst. ulto, has been a few days in hand. I thank you kindly for “the word intended for my private ear,” and shall avail myself freely of the offer, when occasion may require. Since I wrote you last, I concluded that it was hardly worth while to Insure the Carriage, and therefore if fortune has proved adverse, your loss will be total as to the body of the Coach only,...
I have received your kind letter of January; and shall particularly attend to your directions at Philadelphia, respecting the flour—It is at present my intention to leave this place the 4th: of next month; but the winter and the roads are now breaking up; so that I know not whether the roads will at that time be passable The termination of this Congress will leave our public affairs in a...
We are again permitted to return home in good health, after having passed as pleasant a winter as the times would permit. Mr Cushing was confined to his room three weeks with a great cold, attended with a slight fever, but his spirits were good even at that time, & he saw company every day. He attended Court 19th. Feby & on the 22nd. sat near seven hours without once leaving the bench, with as...
Agreable to your wish, expressed some months past, Mrs: Smith, accompanied by Miss Caroline and Our son William, pay you a visit, I lament that it is not in my power to accompany them, but agreable to the old tune, I cannot leave my post, as Besides the paper War is recommencing, and as We are threatned with a broad side, I must recive it, & proceed to action, against the Clintonian...
I have at length returned to the City for the purpose of remaining in it during the rest of the Season. We do not yet pretend to be free from cases of autumnal fever, which have been particularly malignant and fatal; but those, who, like myself, are believers in domestic origin, may return without apprehension. From my brother I have had accounts, from time to time, of the health of our family...
Your very kind letter has eased my heart of a load of anxiety, on account of our dear George, whose health appear’d to me to be in a very indifferent state. and I could not have quitted him with any satisfaction, had I not placed him under your protection. recieve my dear Madam our united thanks for your extreme kindness in taking him to Atkinson which journey I sincerely hope proved...
I fear my dear Madam that long before this you have taxed me with neglect. But however strong appearances are against me, not a day has passed since we parted in a snow storm, that my good wishes for your health & happiness have been omitted. Mr Cushing had business at Norwich, which obliged us to return that way. I then intended & fully expected, as soon as we had arranged the family in some...
A few days since I recieved your very obliging letter in which you mention having procured the articles I wrote for and for which I return you many thanks. I am much distressed at the idea your letter seems to convey of want of respect or attention to Mrs. Cranch it has ever been my most ardent desire so to conduct myself to every branch of your family as not only to merit their esteem but...
I had anticipated a visit from Mrs Adams, & both her Children, for a few days at least, when she came to Haverhill, & we regretted very much that it was not in our power to send for them, or to visit her while there—Abby, & I, both went down a monday, and had the mortification to find she went to Boston the Saturday before—Mr Peabody was absent the whole of your Thansgiving week, & I could not...