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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I am almost asham’d to acknowledge how long it has been since I wrote you last, and can only hope you will consider my numerous letters to my brother, most of which I intended as much for you as for him, to be a sufficient apology—I have not received a line from you or from my father since last June, though I think it impossible but that you should have written more than once—My last letter to...
Permit Me, dear Madam, to offer My thanks for your care of letters, from Our dear Children—and to congratulate you on your return to peace feild . I feel assured that You and Yours, will injoy a tranquility, that is Not in the power of the World to give , Or take away —I reflect with triumph that Mr Adams can adopt those pleaseing lines of Our favourite Poet— “True Conscious honour, is to feel...
A mind agitated by the Vicissitudes attendant upon the present juncture of publick affairs, & oppressed by a large portion of domestic concerns, cannot often be disposed, nor find leisure to delineate its feelings upon paper—To the almost impossibility of portraying the various sentiments, passions, & exercises of the heart which have been roused in the past winter, I attribute yours, & my...
Your kind letter dated this day week, has just come to hand. I rejoice to hear of your arrival once more at the farm house & that you have so far recovered from the unlucky accident, which befel you, as to be able to walk about. The return of my father was announced in the newspapers & with the addition of a line, signifying that “his worth would make him welcome there.” It is a source of...
I received a few days ago your kind letter of 29 January. After having been so many months without a line from you, it gave me sincere pleasure to see your hand-writing again, though I could not but sympathise with the afflictions under the immediate burden of which it was written—I have cordially and deeply lamented my poor brother, and will obey your injunction respecting his child. I learn...
We live in such changfull times that it is delightfull to meet an Old friend with the same face and feelings . Your excellent sister added much to my injoyment yesterday by passing half an hour with me I gave her a long message to you. but as it may be some days before she sees you I think best to write a line. I have been wishing to pass a night or two with you a long time and had not Mrs...
I have received the things you sent me by Townsend and my Aunt Cranch with your letter of this morning and the shirts, for which please to receive my thanks. I find this town so very noisy and the present situation in which I am so very different, on many accounts from any in which I have ever before been, that it will take some time before I shall become naturalized. This circumstance and not...
Ten days ago, I shipped your Carriage on board a Schooner called the Hannah of Nantucket bound for Boston, and as there was no room below, I had to consent to its being secured upon Deck. Since the vessel sailed, we have had, until this day, a constant Succession of North Easterly Storms, which has given me uneasiness on account of your property on board, and in order to cover the loss, in...
Your favor of the 22d: inst. ulto, has been a few days in hand. I thank you kindly for “the word intended for my private ear,” and shall avail myself freely of the offer, when occasion may require. Since I wrote you last, I concluded that it was hardly worth while to Insure the Carriage, and therefore if fortune has proved adverse, your loss will be total as to the body of the Coach only,...
It was with peculiar pleasure my dear Mrs Adams that I received your kind favour of 5th of April, having heard of the accident you met with, I was fearful it might have been attended with bad concequences. Your neighbours whom you mention as being sick, I hope are in a state of convalescence & that Quincy air, is more salubrious than it has been for some time past. That the weather has been...
I received your favor of the 16th: on the 23d: instt:. My time has been so much taken up, during the week past, with removing my Office & lodgings, that I could not conveniently devote any portion of it to return you an answer. I have now obtained an establishment, which has long been the object of my wishes, namely, an Office under the same roof, where I lodge; in a pleasant part of Walnut...
For the communications by Mrs. Black, you have my grateful acknowledgements. She made me only a short, and sweet. I was very sorry she could not tarry longer. I rejoice to hear that after many dissappointments your Eldest Son is at length made the happy Father of a living Child. May his and your joy be complete, by seeing it grow up, a comfort to its Parents, an honour and a blessing to the...
The enclosed publications should have been sent by your Son. The Account of Christr: Ludwick was written to fulfil an Old promise made many years ago, in case I should survive him. You will feel the patriotic Sentiments uttered by him. To the present calculating generation, they appear fanatical, and unintelligible.— I send you the Account of the successful use of Mercury in the Consumption,...
The night before, our Exhibition I received your kind letter, which indeed sunk my spirits, as you can well suppose. My poor sick Son!—I had heard he had been ill, but was much better—& I hoped as I heard nothing from any one, that he had gotten quite well. I write to let him know that it is the joint request of Mr Peabody & myself that he would come & endeavour to revisit in the good air of...
Our city has sustained a very great loss in the death of Dr. Bailey. As health officer, he was obliged to reside upon Staten Island, to which the sick from the vessels that came in were carried, and the hospitals have been crowded all summer with the Irish emigrants; he has taken the fever from them, and was only ill four or five days. He has not left his equal as a physician most certainly in...
I fear my dear Madam that long before this you have taxed me with neglect. But however strong appearances are against me, not a day has passed since we parted in a snow storm, that my good wishes for your health & happiness have been omitted. Mr Cushing had business at Norwich, which obliged us to return that way. I then intended & fully expected, as soon as we had arranged the family in some...
In our absence from home, you was so obliging as to address a line to Mrs Gerry, which she has desired me to acknowledge, & to inform you, that in leiu of the first volume of Wraxall, that of Volneys travels was by mistake enclosed to her. this is sent to Mr Smiths, & if the volume of Wraxall should be sent there, or at Mrs Catharine Davis’ in tremont Street, I will order my servant to call...
I received your favor of the 10th: instt: the Day before yesterday, with an enclosure for J Q A & his wife, which I forwarded to her, as I perceived it was addressed to them both. They spent a week with me here, during the hottest spell of weather, we have experienced, this summer, and though much overcome by it, I was surprized to find, that they bore it so well. Dr: Rush, in the absence of...
I have recieved your very kind letters and should certainly have answer’d them sooner had I not been prevented by a disagreeable complaint in my hands I was very to understand from your last letter that you had again suffered an attack of your former illness I hope however that you have now entirely recovr’d your health and that the sight of your beloved Son will prove a cordial and contribute...
I have received your favors of the 5th: & 12th: currt:; the first containing the mournful tidings of the death of our venerable Uncle Quincy; and the latter, by my brother, directing me to procure for you a mourning ring. I hope by the time my brother returns from Washington, to have your commission complied with, but as you gave me no particular directions respecting the fashion of the ring,...
I have intended every day since my arrival here to write you a line and inform you of my having safely reached it; but have hitherto been prevented, partly by business, and partly by the waste of time in visits, dinners and other avocations of the like nature: I say partly by business, for I have found much more of that to do here than I was aware of: upon undertaking to settle my accounts...
We left Washington on the 3d: instt: as I informed you in my letter from that place of the 1st: it was our intention to do—Mr: and Mrs. Johnson and their two youngest daughters accompanied us to Frederick—But Mr: Johnson and my child were both taken so ill on the road that we had some difficulty to complete our day’s journey—Mr. Johnson’s illness detained us a week at Frederick-town, where I...
Your favor of the 22d: has been duly received. On the subject of peace, our Merchants are quite as drooping, as those of Boston; indeed it is viewed by the eyes of cupidity, as to our Country, a great national calamity. I do not regard it such, and therefore rather rejoice at it, as affording the best prospect for the gradual restoration of reason to many of our poor lunatic Countrymen. For...
I hope my Dear Sister has had her Cup of happiness filled, by having an amiable long absent Son, with his wife & little One, sit at her Thanksgiving Table. I have not heard of his return from Washington, but presumed it would be an object with him to be with his beloved Parents upon that Day. I thought of the pleasurable Circle, & sincerely wished myself one of the Affectionate Band, for I...
It was with regret, that I left Boston without seeing you again, but we were in such a state of uncertainty, till it was tame to take our departer, that it was not in my power. I am extremely sorry to hear by Mrs Cushing that you was very unwell, when she left you; but hope that you are quite recovered; by this, & that you will enjoy the society of your friends and neighbours this winter,...
We came to the City on the 4th The weather & roads were as favorable as could be expected for the season. At New-York we had the pleasure to hear from Mrs Smith, that your health was much better than when we were at Quincey. Judge Cranch was so good as to engage us lodgings; they are as agreeable as any here, although not so pleasant to us as the last winter. I have been twice to see Mrs...
My wife having been at the Ball last Night, was not up this morning, when your letter was brought by Mr: Briesler—In her name and my own therefore I must return you our thanks for your loaf of bread, and fine goose—It gives me great satisfaction to learn you are getting better—Our black man too is recovering, and we have no symptoms yet in any other part of the family—We have letters with...
I have your favor of the 7th: instt: before me; the letter for Mrs: Adams, which came with it, was sent to her the day after I received it, and the same day, She called in a carriage at my Office, to inform me of its receipt. Her daughter was with her and in good health. I have not been able to visit her so often as I wished, but before She returns to New York I will try to see her again. I...
The roads have been so bad & the weather such that I had almost despaired of ever hearing again from Quincy—I am very happy to hear that you and the President are well again—I left last week a letter & a number of papers at Connors for Mrs Black to take to Quincy. I hope you have received them. I send by Richard to days & yesterdays papers, with a number of papers & a letter from Wheaton,...
Richard has just brought me your note and I am very happy to hear you are all well. Betsys Mother must be mistaken as to her having had the Measles as she is now confined to her room which we hope she will leave tomorrow she has had them very favorably and at her age I think it a happy thing to have got through the disorder George we expect will have them next Sunday it is unfortunate as he...