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    • Pinckney, Charles
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jefferson Presidency
    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Pinckney, Charles" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I wrote to you the 4 instant from this & enclosed the copy of the within But as it went by a circuitous route & may have miscarried I send you a duplicate thereof.—I mentioned we had given Mr. Madison an unanimous Vote here & are pleased with stand the Government are about to take as to the Belligerents I will thank you if any vessel or dispatches go to Mr Pinkney or the Consul to Send the...
I had the honour by the last post but one to inclose you the proceedings that had taken place in consequence of the late outrage & I now have the honour to apply to you by the request of the General Committee to have a part of the sum appropriated for the defence of this City & Harbour laid out for it’s immediate protection & to expedite the permanent defence thereof & to direct an adequate...
In pursuance of my promise I have the honour to inform you that as soon as I recieved my instructions I sailed for Europe & had almost the whole way Eastwardly Winds—by which means the ship in which I arrived two hours agoe at Helder in Holland has had upwards of fifty six days passage—five of which we have been off the Texel & unable from the Winds to get in.—I propose to set out to morrow...
I had the pleasure of recieving your favour with the inclosure—as by the rotatory nature of our constitution I am ineligible again to the Executive here for four years & my time is just expiring I thought I owed it to your administration & to my constituents to make the inclosed communication in order that our citizens may understand the grounds on which You have made a stand against invasions...
I had the honor sometime since of mentioning Mr. Freneau to you as a proper person to be the Collector of Charleston & we have some reason to suppose that had you known in time of his willingness to accept he would have been appointed.—I now have the honour to say that should the Floridas be ultimately obtained & annexed to our territory & any such office therein should be offered to him as...
Having been absent for some weeks on the reviews in the interior of this country I had not the honour of receiving your letter until this day.—as I was constantly shifting my situation every day I ordered all letters to me to be kept for safety in Charleston & therefore was surprised to see in a late Newspaper a letter published addressed to me which I had never seen or recieved from Mr....
Our latest intelligence from Europe & Washington inducing an opinion that the Embargo will not soon be taken off, & possibly that a rupture will soon take place with Great Britain, I consider it as my duty to state that our Legislature adjourned in December long before we knew of the Embargo or the receipt of the Blockading Decrees of the belligerent powers & of course made no provision but...
Since my arrival in this City—lately I have been so confined by the indisposition & serious illness of one of my family that I have been able to attend to little else otherwise I should have written You more fully than I leave you a Number of occurrences here which You no doubt of have heard through other Channels—as the post goes out in an hour or two I send this line & shall write by the...
I have the honour to inform You that I have this moment arrived & have thank God found my family well. I experienced three severe gales on the Voyage & was 52 days on board Via Lisbon.—it is my intention to go on to Washington in the spring to have the pleasure of paying my respects to Yourself & Mr Madison & our other friends of bringing my accounts.—when I have the pleasure of seeing you I...
I have had the honor of recieving your favour of & am pleased to find my conduct has met your approbation—It is to be feared too many attempts are still making to break the Embargo & that all the vigilance of the officers & means employed will be necessary to prevent it.—Since I had the honour to write you last some important events have taken place in Europe, particularly as it respects the...