Thomas Jefferson Papers
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To Thomas Jefferson from Charles Pinckney, 8 December 1808

DecemBer 8:1808 In CoLumBia

Dear Sir

I wrote to you the 4 instant from this & enclosed the copy of the within But as it went by a circuitous route & may have miscarried I send you a duplicate thereof.—I mentioned we had given Mr. Madison an unanimous Vote here & are pleased with stand the Government are about to take as to the Belligerents

I will thank you if any vessel or dispatches go to Mr Pinkney or the Consul to Send the enclosed letter to him & to request him the favour of forwarding it—

Our Citizens bear the losses of the Embargo with great great patriotism & are ready to meet all wants in defence of their independence as a nation.—

In the course of the summer it is to be expected the Question must be decided whether we have a war or not & with which power.—the latter we have little doubt of in this state, should the Spaniards succeed—if not & the English Armies are obliged to leave   that country, it may make some difference, although no doubt the trade with their colonies may have a tendency to tempt them to hold on as long as they can—

But be the Event as it may the people of this State are with you & Mr. Madison almost to a man—.

I was much pleased to see your corespondence with Colonel Monroe & to hear a similar one had arisen Between Mr Madison & him.—I well know Colonel Monroes worth & principles & respect & regard him much. I know also the great affection & regared he has for Yourself & Mr Madison. how tenderly & affectionately he used to speek to me of You both in Europe & how You each regarded him with the most paternal affection—I therefore rejoiced when I saw these letters, for when I go to Washington, the greatest pleasure I expected was to see You all & as candid as I knew You were & ought to be with each other—I will thank you to present my regards & best respects to both—

With great respect & regard I am always dear Sir Yours Truly

Charles Pinckney

If you favour me with a line please Direct it to Charleston—

DLC: Papers of Thomas Jefferson.

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