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  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency
  • Dates From

    • 1801-03-04
  • Dates To

    • 1805-03-03
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Adams, Thomas Boylston" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Starting date=4 March 1801 AND Ending date=3 March 1805
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I know not how it has happened that I have not found time to write you Since my return to my long home. The angry North East Wind, which has prevailed with little Interruption has pinched my faculties, I believe. We have been all, pretty well. This is the Day of our Election of Governor, Lt Govr. & Senators. The Democrats are very Sanguine and the others are not So. The former Say that Mr...
I know not how it has happened that I have not found time to write you, Since my return to my long home. The angry North East Wind, which has prevailed, with little Interruption, has pinched by faculties I believe. We have been all pretty well. This is the day of our Election of Governor Lt Governor & Senators. The Democrats are very Sanguine and the others are not So. The former Say that Mr...
If any one had foretold that three or four months would have passed away at Stonnyfield, and that I should have written but one short line to my dear Thomas, I should have resented the prediction, as an affront to my understanding, if not to my heart yet so it is. I have not even acknowledged yours of 21st of May. My heart was too full to write upon the subject of that of your letter which...
I received yours of the 4th with double pleasure occasioned, by the Encouragement you give me to hope that I shall See you Soon at this chosen spot. There are indeed in this Country, all the Characters and humours that you describe, and there will be such for many years to come, which will keep alive the extravagant Spirit of democracy longer than it would live of itself. Exaggerations of...
I received your favor of 27th: Ult. in season; and have been slow to answer it; for what should I say? Quid ego irrigationes? Quid fossiones agri, repastinationesque proferam, quibus sit multo terra fæcundior? Quid de Ulilitate loquar Stercorandi? Quid ego vitium Satus, ortus, incrementa commemorem? I might say to you, Satiari delectatione non possum, ut meæ Senectutis requietem...
Have a care, that you do not let Captain Duane know, that I am reading Cicero de Senectute again: because he will immediately insert in his Aurora Borealis, that I recollected, those Words in the 17th Chapter “nihil ei tam regale videri, quam Studium agri colendi.” He will say that there is nothing in building Stone Wall, or in collecting Heaps of Compost, but the tang of Royalty and Monarchy,...
Politicks are forbidden fruit to me, at present, and what other Subject can I choose for a Letter? Shall I tell you what Books I read? or how many times a Week I go into the Woods? These Informations would not be interesting to you. I Suppose I may hint at a Question of Law without giving offence to the Powers that be, or the Powers that once were, but be not . A great noise has been made...
Mr Dobson the Bookseller has an Account open with me.—It is of 13 or 14. or 15 Years Standing.—Several Years ago he Sent his account to me, but, intending to take the Ballance due to me in books I did not Sign it. I wish you would call upon him, and presenting him my Compliments pray him to Send his account to me through you. I presume there is a ballance due to me. This ballance you may take...
I recd in due Course your favour of March 18 and thank you for your prompt and punctual Attention to my several requests. The Harleyan Miscellany I should be glad to have. Mr Dobsons account I presume is correct. I know not the Cost of the Harleyan Miscellany: but if any ballance should remain you may take it in any Books you may want, or Send any to me that you think have merit. I have red...
I am much alarmed at the Intimations in the public Prints of the Appearance and prevalence of the Fever in Phyladelphia. Anxiety for the public in all our great Cities as well as in Philadelphia, is not So easily removed as our concern for your Person may be by your own discretion, in removing immediately from the Scene of danger. It will be a favourable moment to make a Visit to Us. I long to...