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Documents filtered by: Author="Monroe, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I have the pleasure to transmit you a copy of some communications which have lately taken place between this government and myself relative to the trial of Captain Whitby, which you will find is postponed till the first of March next to afford an opportunity for the witnesses to attend on the part of the United States. The time allowed is I fear rather short for the o bject, especially if the...
I had the honor to receive your letter of July 6th. by Doctor Bullus on the 31. ulto. & did not lose a moment in entering on the business committed to me by it, in the manner which seemed most likely to obtain success. The details shall be communicated to you in my next dispatch. All that I can state at present is, that the whole subject has been plac’d fully before this government in as...
I arrived here on the 2d. which was notified immediately to Mr. Cevallos by Mr. Pinckney, who acknowledged the notice in polite terms from Aranjuez to which place the court was moving at the time of my arrival. He invited us there for me to be presented to the King, which took place on the 13. The reception was very attentive & friendly: we had one interview with the minister afterwards, in...
You may consider the letter wh. accompanies this either as a publick or private one as is most proper. If it may be taken as a private one that will be most agreeable to me, for reasons you will readily conceive. I intended to have written you fully on my private concerns, but really I have not time, as I do not wish to delay my departure a moment for Madrid, whither I set out in an hour or...
We have the honor to inclose the account which Should be annexed to the Convention transmitted you. The Bordeaux embargo is in Assignats, and two thirds will be deducted from many of the others. We have reason to think from a particular account now in our hands there will be Such considerable deductions as will reduce the whole charge to less than 20 millions of livres including the interest....
Since my last nothing interesting has taken place in any view on this side of the atlantick. I have been told that my note was referrd to the admiralty, from whom a report had not been recd wh. was the cause of delay in the answer; that the delay in the admiralty was in part owing to some changes in it, Sr. Evan Nepean being removed to Ireland in character of chief secry. to the Ld....
I have recd. several letters of late from some of our friends, who complain of the arrangment or rather provision made in the treaties with France for American creditors, to whom they intimate an attention was paid wh. may embarrass our treasury. It is presumeable that we might have plac’d them on any reasonably satisfactory ground that we wod. have proposed; but as the payment of no part of...
You will receive with this a duplicate of a private letter sent some few days past by Liverpool. It is private from the reference it has to Mr. Livingston, of whom it may [be] better that any remarks however impartial which I make, shod. be thus convey’d. I hope you will receive that, as this being a bad copy from the press may not be easily read. I lately requested that you wod. be so good as...
It is this moment reported and is I think unquestionably true that Mr. Pitt is dead. He is said to have expired this morning. The complete disorder of his bowells, and of his digestive faculties, were the simptoms which attended his last moments. It is more than presumeable that the failure of his measures on the continent may have been the real cause of them & of his death. The parliment...
My publick letter and the papers will give you every thing wh. is not communicated in my letter to the President. What has become of the convention formed by Mr. King just before he sailed from this country? You have not mentioned it in any communication of late. Mr. Baring tells me it was rejected, wh. is the only intelligence I have on the subject. In commencing a negotiation it is probable...
I took the liberty lately to forward to yr. care by Major Coleman who went to Alexa. a box containing the three pieces of tapestry, which are intended for Mr. Fenwick, he having promised to take charge of and sell them for me. Can you possibly convey them to his possession. He is I believe some where ⟨in th⟩e neighbourhood of the federal city. Will you also be so good as put the enclosed...
28 September 1803, London . Introduces the bearer, Mr. Halsey, “a respectable citizen” of Rhode Island. “He has been introduced to me as a young man of the best connections there, and I have understood from the best authority, that his character & conduct in Europe, have been such as might be expected from a person well educated and connected in the UStates. I shall thank you to present Mr....
You will receive within a copy of a note recd. yesterday Evening from Mr. OReilly of Phila., of certain reports in circulation yesterday at the exchange. That with respect to the Prussian minister has been confirm’d in the gazettes of this morning, tho’ no notice is taken in them of that wh. more particularly regards us. I send so much of the Chronicle as respects publick concerns. No allusion...
I believe the ship is almost ready to sail, but that her detention to sunday will not expose me to any expence. We are ready to embark as soon as I receive my instructions. I left in yr. office the observations of Mr. Ellicot on our southern & western territory, having no time to read them at Georgetown & prefering to take every paper from yr. department in the same packet. I hope you found &...
Mr. Purviance to whom we commit the treaty which we have lately concluded with the British government will have the pleasure to deliver you this with our publick dispatch. He acted as Secretary to the commission in the late negotiation, the duties of which office, which were laborious, he discharged in every respect intirely to our satisfaction. We had equal proof in the course of this...
Since my last nothing material has occurr’d here or in any other quarter that has come to my knowledge in which the United States are interested. On the impressment of our seamen and some other interferences with our commerce, I propose shortly to address a note to the Secretary of State for foreign affairs, to which I have reason to expect that a suitable attention will be paid. I took...
I have yours of the 26th. of decr (private[)] with those which accompanied it. No change of any kind has taken place in publick affrs. since my last. It will I think be more easy to form a treaty than obtain thro’ the admiralty any important change in the system as to impressments. I expect to receive further instructions by Mr. Baring, & powers if it is yr. wish to form a treaty. The King is...
Although the negotiation with which we are charged with the Government of Spain is only in the earliest stage, yet we consider it our duty to communicate to you what has passed on that interesting subject, by the safe opportunity furnished by Mr. Gorham, who leaves Madrid to Morrow for the United States. As soon as the Mission Extraordinary was received by the King, & we were apprized by Mr....
I dined yesterday with the Minister of foreign relations in Company with my colleague, Mr. Marbois and others. After dinner Mr. Marbois and myself had much conversation on the Subject of my Mission in which he declared with frankness an earnest desire to adjust every possible cause of variance with us. He assured me that the first Consul had decided to offer us the whole of Louisiana for 100...
This will be presented to you by Mr. Davis a very respectable young man from the State of Kentuckey, who among other acquirments wh. he deems useful, is making by a trip to the Eastward, that of a knowledge of men and things in that quarter. I beg to present him to yr. acquaintance & civilities and to request you will be so kind, and give him a letter of introduction to any person, with whom...
You promised to send me the documents which I left in your hands when at Washington as soon as copies were made of them, or Mr. Rose delivered to you the originals. As it will be necessary for me to recur to those documents in the letter wh. I intimated to you it was my duty to write you on the subject of the treaty lately signed by Mr. Pinkney & myself, with the British commissrs., and it is...
I heard last night of Mr. Lee at Bordeaux that my dispatches from that place on my way here original & duplicate to you, have both miscarried, one set in the brig george which was wrecked in the bay of Biscay, the other in the ship mars captn. Wilson, on the coast of Ireland. I regret this extremely because I began to hope daily of hearing from you in reply. I have since sent by Mr. Gorham as...
I am happy in yr. acceptance of the department of State in the new admn. & sincerely hope yr. service will prove honorable to yourself, and prosperous to yr. country. Nor have I a doubt of the result, since we have had enough of crisis, to teach the people how to estimate an admn. which is attached & faithful to republican principles. Mr. Jefferson’s address delivered on taking the oath gives...
We have the pleasure to transmit you a copy of a Note from Mr. Fox of yesterday which announces the appointment of Lords Holland and Auckland to meet us on the subjects which are embraced by our joint Commission. We flatter ourselves that we shall enter on this business in the course of a few days, and that we shall be able in a short time afterwards to speak with some confidence of the...
I had the honor to transmit you with my letter of the 4. inst. a copy of a correspondence with Mr. Canning relative to the late aggression in the case of the Chesapeak frigate. You will receive with this a copy of a more recent one on the same Subject. By Mr. Canning’s queries in his last note I was led to consider it as preparatory to an embargo on American vessels. I could not conceive why...
I ought to have answer’d sooner your favor of the 5th., but I have been so unsettled since my return, and so much interrupted that I have equally neglected my friends & my private affairs. I have recd. the note for 300. dolrs. wh. I did not wish you to have sent, being altogether ignorant of the claim wh. I have to any sum beyond what I had before recd. This however will be adjusted between us...
I must request that you will be so good as to forward the enclosed to Mr Divers. As it relates to an object of some importance to me I am very desirous that it reach him soon. On publick topicks I have nothing to add to our joint communication. We have had many difficulties to encounter with this govt., & I hope that such will never occur again in our relations with it. If a favorable...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance Mr. Camp of Culpepper a young man who was presented to me by Mr. Wm. Lambert, who formerly wrote in Mr. Beckley’s office, and likewise by Mr. Pollard of this place who is his relative. His object is to obtain some office, or rather employment, under you if to be had, or in the treasury department if yr. office can give him no place. By Mr. Lamberts...
It is probable I may sail in the remittance Captn. Law in Jany. to be with you the last of Feby or first of March. Nothing will prevent it but the season, especially shod. it be unfavorable. However I will write you by the John Bulkeley for Phila. which sails next week. I shall be able then to bring you full information of the state of our affairs in this Country, & on the continent, & it is...
You will have been surprized at not hearing from us sooner on the business confided to us, under the Commission with which we are honored by the President. The delay proceeded from a desire to give you some satisfactory information of our progress in it which it was not in our power to do. It happened unfortunately, just about the time of Mr Pinkney’s arrival, on the 24. ulto., that Mr. Fox...