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Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Voss of Culpepper county, a young man of merit, who has expressd a wish of being personally known to you. He is a lawyer by profession, of respectable standing at the bar, and a fair prospect of becoming eminent if he pursues his profession. He intends making a visit this spring to the south, and hearing that it is proposed to adjust the...
I am happy in yr. acceptance of the department of State in the new admn. & sincerely hope yr. service will prove honorable to yourself, and prosperous to yr. country. Nor have I a doubt of the result, since we have had enough of crisis, to teach the people how to estimate an admn. which is attached & faithful to republican principles. Mr. Jefferson’s address delivered on taking the oath gives...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance Mr. Camp of Culpepper a young man who was presented to me by Mr. Wm. Lambert, who formerly wrote in Mr. Beckley’s office, and likewise by Mr. Pollard of this place who is his relative. His object is to obtain some office, or rather employment, under you if to be had, or in the treasury department if yr. office can give him no place. By Mr. Lamberts...
I had yours of the 7th. by yesterday’s mail. The danger of reaction is the evil to be fear’d from an energetic course, of disgusting and disuniting the republican party by an opposit one. These are the rocks, (to use a worn out metaphor) which you have to shun and which it is not easy to shun, but which may be done. On which side is the greater danger? In my judgement the latter. On which side...
Mr. Fenwick has requested me to state to you what I know of his conduct while acting under my ministry with the French republick. Altho’ it wod. be more agreeable that no appeal shod. be made to me on subjects of the kind yet it is impossible to withhold my evidence where it is called for by the party interested, especially under circumstances like the present. When I went to France Mr....
I acknowledged yours of the 7th. by Mr. Camp who went on some days since. I shod. have answered it more fully before this had I not been prevented by indisposition from wh. I am nearly recovered. Your address has been approved by every description of persons here. It is sound and strong in principle, and grateful to the opposit party. With your judgment views and principles it is hardly...
My present and past employments have made me acquainted with many deserving men whose demands I cannot resist to make themselves & their views known to you. I must mention several at present with whom I stand in that predicamt. lest by withholding their pretentions longer, a reliance on me for that service might possibly expose them to injury. David Gelston of New Yk. wod. be happy to accept...
Jas. Monroe is happy to inform Mr. Jefferson that Joseph Scott the person lately appointed Marshall for this district, is the brother of Genl. Scott of Kentuckey. He was an officer through the revolutionary war, dangerously wounded in one of its battles by which he lost the use of one of his arms, is respectable for his talents, of fair and upright character, and sound in his political...
I am inclined to think the mode by which a certain end is to be accomplished, refering to a subject in discussion when I last saw you, is of less importance than I then thought it. A gradual operation will not offend republicans, nor will an off-hand entire one, make friends of the tories. Sooner or later that party will rally and make another effort. That course which best preserves, at the...
I had intended writing you on a subject mentioned in my last , but when I came to act on it I found it an affair of more personal delicacy than I had anticipated. Between the person referr’d to and myself nothing ever occurr’d to restrain me from expressing my sentiments freely on any subject in wh. the publick were interested, but yet I feel that I shod. be the last person in the world who...
I found on my return from Albemarle the day before yesterday yours of the 6th. wh. had arrived in my absence. Mrs. M. who recd. it forwarded immediately to Callendar that which was enclosed to him, very properly concluding it was more important he shod. receive it without delay, than that I shod. previously peruse it. As I do not know precisely the contents of yr. letter to him, I can make no...
This will be presented to you by Mr. Davis a very respectable young man from the State of Kentuckey, who among other acquirments wh. he deems useful, is making by a trip to the Eastward, that of a knowledge of men and things in that quarter. I beg to present him to yr. acquaintance & civilities and to request you will be so kind, and give him a letter of introduction to any person, with whom...
I was requested by the General Assembly at its last Session to transmit to the President of the United States, a copy of my communication to it, with the documents accompanying it, relative to the conduct of the Britith Consul at Norfolk, who was charged with having received a man of a Magistrate of the Borough of Norfolk, said to have confessed himself one of the Mutineers on board the...
Since my last Callendar has been twice with me. He called in the morning on friday last and appeared so agitated that I requested him to call again, hoping he might be more composed. He returnd in the evening in the same temper, so that I thought it best to hear what he had to say, that our communication might be concluded on the subject of the interview. He complained that no positive order...
I have inclosed you the papers relative to the British Consul at Norfolk, in the affr. of the man who was sent to the Island and as reported executed, for mutiny on bd. a British ship. In a private letter sometime since I submitted to you a question respecting the mode of correspondence to be observed, between the Executive of the Genl. Govt. and a state, in wh. I gave my opinion freely. I...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Blake consul at St. Domingo who is represented to me by respectable authority to have rendered useful service to his country in that office. I am persuaded on inquiry into the character and services of this gentleman, you will find him what I believe him to be on the authority of his introduction to me, very deserving of yr. attention and...
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. As the person for whose benefit the enclosed was intended has left this for Washington it is thought best to return it. It is presumed that every thing appertaing. to that object will be settled at Washington with that person; but shod. the contrary be the case, and it be proper to execute any thing here, J.M. will with pleasure attend to it when...
I have yours of the 1st. and have since seen Mr. Callendar with whom I had much conversation, in which I endeavored to tranquilize his mind, and bring him to view the cause of his disquietude with more temper and candor. I retrac’d the commencment of his acquaintance with the person on whom his displeasure chiefly rested, to shew there was no period at which the attentions of that person were...
The letter enclosed was sent to the tavern for Mr. Beckley, but the tavern keeper omitted to give it to him. Will you be so good as deliver that to him personally if at Washington. I communicated to Mr. Jefferson the wish of David Gelston for employment in the collectorship at New York, & he told me, he wod. be attended to. He is a very honest, respectable republican, one to whom the cause is...
The day after the date of my last to you I saw Mr. Randolph & communicated to him the contents of the paragh. in yrs., which was intended for him. He promised to write you immediately on the subject of it. I requested him to confer with the late marshall and ascertain whether he wod. pay Callendar the fine remitted him, under the late order of the Treasury department, which he very willingly...
I enclose you a resolution of the General Assembly of this Commonwealth, of the last session, by which it is made my duty to correspond with you on the subject of obtaining by purchase lands without the limits of this state, to which persons obnoxious to the laws or dangerous to the peace of society may be removed. This resolution was produced by the conspiracy of the slaves which took place...
I communicated to you, when I had last the pleasure to see you, that during the late conspiracy of the slaves in this state, I had, by advice of the Council, ordered a guard, consisting of a subaltern and suitable number of men over the deposit of Arms and military Stores of the United States at New London , which would be continued until you had made some disposition of those Arms, which...
Colo. Norton has been very solicitous with me to write you in behalf of his son in law Captn. Merchant who was condemned to a fine and two years imprisonment, for piracy. I know so little of the merits of the case that I wished to avoid saying any thing on it, and write more to give a proof, of my respect for the feelings of a venerable old parent than in the expectation of rendering the...
Hearing that Mr. Hay is disposed to seize the few days of leasure which an interval between the courts gives him, to visit the federal city with his lady and that he doubts whether you wod. recognize him, I take a pleasure in fre’ing him from that anxiety. He is really a very able and respectable citizen, one who deserves and will be highly gratified with your attention. At what time will you...
On my return from Albemarle two days since I found the enclosed from Mr. Forbes which I beg to submit to yr. consideration. I was well acquainted with Mr. Forbes in France, and considered him one of the best informed & most deserving of our countrymen at that time in that country. He was educated at Cambridge in Mass: and bred to the law, wh. he declined in favor of commerce, having at the...
It has occurr’d to me it might possibly be of some use for me to give Mr. Livingston a letter to the consul Cambaceres. I was well acquainted with him, while in France, had much intercourse on publick business & he was often at my house. Still I am not aware it will produce any good effect; perhaps there may be an impropriety in my writing him. I send you a letter to him for mr. L., and submit...
At the request of Mr. Arthur Lee of Norfolk I have given him an introduction to you, but not knowing his object, think proper to mention that I do not, as the contrary might otherwise be inferrd. He is in my opinion a young man of merit, tho it is not founded on much acquaintance with him. He deliver’d an oration not long since which was well spoken of, and is a republican. He is however...
Letter not found. 11 October 1801. Acknowledged in JM to Monroe, 24 Oct. 1801 . Encloses letter for Robert R. Livingston.
Letter not found. 15 October 1801, Richmond. Calendared in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC, series 7, container 2) as a two-page letter “recommending sund[r]y persons” and concerning “a sword for the heir of Gen. Campbell to be presented by Virginia.” Acknowledged in JM to Monroe, 24 Oct. 1801 .
I requested Major Coleman to enclose you lately 300. dolrs. which are intended as a remitance or deposit to enable Mr. Livingston to purchase two swords, one for the heir of Genl. Campbell the other for John Jouett, for services rendered in the course of our revolutionary war. You will receive herewith a letter to Mr. L. on that subject which you will be so good as peruse, seal & forward him...