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The enclosed letter is from Captn. De Butts in whose vessel, and under whose command I sailed to France. I have known him since that time and believe him to be a very honest deserving man. This letter exhibits such a picture of unmerited misfortune & distress as is calculated to excite the simpathy of every benevolent mind. I send it to you to request you will be so kind as look into the...
Since writing the within letter I have seen Mr. Merry on [ sic ] had an interesting conversation with him on our affrs. especially the impressment of our seamen. I have given you an acct. of it in a letter committed to his care, but it may be well to add it here also; He told me that he had confer’d with Ld. H. on that subject as he had promised me, and that he was instructed by Ld. H. to...
I hasten to transmit you a copy of the note which I lately wrote to Lord Howick, to request a postponement of the trial of Capn. Whitby, and of his reply to it; by which you will find, that the trial is postponed to the first of May. At present, I am too much indisposed to make any remarks on the subject; though indeed, I do not know that it would be in my power, to add any thing material to...
My expenses abroad having exceeded unavoidable the compensation allowed me in the station I held & the mismanagement of my estate in my absence, make it an object to me to command on loan the sum of about 10,000 dolrs. I should therefore be happy to receive the accomodation from the bank provided it would be willing to make it, on su ch terms as I could accept, or indeed comply with. To enable...
I omitted to state in my letter of Saturday last that the copy which I then sent you of a proposition, which Mr Pinkney & I presented to the British comrs. relative to impressment which was mentioned in our letter to you of Novr. 11th. 1806. and which, as I believe, we afterwards renewed to Mr. Canning, was a copy only of the amendment which we offered to your original project: you will I...
After my interview with Mr. Fox on the 25. ulto. I waited a fortnight without hearing from him. This new instance of delay surprised me, because he had shewn a sensibility to the former one, and did not seem aware of the necessity of adding to it. Independent of the general object, the war with Prussia and the blockades incident to it, the doctrine and practice respecting which it was...
I enclose you the letter from Mr. Livingston wh. was referr’d to in my publick one of the 9th. It is to be presumed that this affr. is ended between him & me. I have adverted to the guaranty in my publick letter in all the lights in wh. it seemed to be applicable to the existing state of affrs. in relation to France & Spain. It appears probable that it may be necessary that some person shod....
I enclose you a copy of a private journal which I have kept of the affair with this government, which connected with the letter from Bordeaux, of which I send you a more correct copy, gives a history of the whole transaction. I am well convincd that the affair at Paris had no other object than a financial one, and that success was expected from immediate accomodation, or the fear of danger on...
We have the honor to transmit you a Treaty which we concluded with the British Commissioners on the 31st. of December. Altho’ we had entertained great confidence from the commencement of the negotiation, that such would be it’s result, it was not untill the 27th. that we were able to make any satisfactory arrangement of several of the most important points that were involved in it. On the next...
I enclose you a copy of a letter recd. not long since from Mr. Marbois and of my reply relative to the guaranty of ten millions of livres, of wh. you are already informd, and also of a communication with Mr. Livingston on the same subject. I comprize the latter in a private letter for the reason mentioned in my last, subjecting it nevertheless to yr. disposition. I have been very reluctantly...
My last to you was of the 16th. ulto. which was forwarded, by triplicate, by Bordeaux. We have since answered his note the recept of which was communicated in the to you on the western limits, in which we have insisted on the rio bravo as the just boundary on that side, as he complained that we had misconceived the cause of the delay to which he had subjected us in the negotiation, and wounded...
11 July 1803, Paris . “Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance & attention the bearer Mr. Helbran a naturalised citizen of the UStates. He is a young man of merit of very respectable connections, who reside principally at Bordeaux, and he returns to the UStates with commercial views where he has resided for several years, as his documents shew. Having recd. much attention from his friends...
I received lately a letter from the house of Mackenzie and Glennie of this city giving an account of a fraud which has been practiced on them in the name of Commodore Preble, by which they have paid to his account in favor of the United States £4000. sterling. I transmit you a copy of their communication and beg to assure you that I shall not fail to make all the exertion in my power to trace...
We have been honored by your favors of the 18th April & the 28th May, as they both relate to measures that might lead to the accomplishment of the Treaty which was executed previous to their arrival no remarks upon them are necessary Except that one idea is held out in the last that Britain interested herself in preventing the possession of Louisiana by France. The fact is that she was totally...
This will be presented you by Mr. Gauvain who with his Lady have made us a visit since I wrote you last. He is the Gentn. of whom I wrote you & whose trip I wished to delay a week on account of particular circumstances, of a domestic nature. He was in my family near a year, or indeed rather more, after the appointment of Mr. Skipwith to the consulate. He is amiable, well informed, perfectly...
I have the pleasure to send you a copy of my note to Mr. Fox and of his answer respecting the misconduct of Captain Whitby at the port of New York in April last. You will find by it that that officer was removed from the command of the Leander by an order from the Admiralty of the 22d. of June, and that he is to be brought home to be tried by a Court Martial on that charge. I have lately...
We have the pleasure to acquaint you that we have this day agreed with the British Commissioners to Conclude a Treaty on all the points which have formed the object of our negotiation, and on terms which we trust our government will approve. It will require only a few days to reduce it to form. When that is done we shall transmit it to you by a special messenger. We hasten to communicate to...
A knowledge that there exists a disposition to misrepresent all the facts relative to the late negotiation at Paris, induc’d me in my first private communications to you to put in your possession the means of doing justice to the parties concern’d and interested in that event. Every thing that I stated or suggested in my letters by Mr. Hughes and Mr. Jay has been confirmed since. I doubted...
Jas. Monroe has the pleasure to enclose to Mr. Madison a power of attorney from Genl. La Fayette relative to whom he will shortly write him more fully. He can not omit adding here that that respectable & virtuous character merits all the regard which America has never ceased to entertain for him. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Docketed by JM: “Monroe Js. Aug. 1. 1803. inclosing...
To morrow our project will be presented to Mr. Cevallos. To prepare it and the letter which accom[pa]nies it required sometime, and to have the whole translated into French still more, which will explain why it has not yet been presented. Tho’ indeed not one moment has been lost, considering the extent and importance of the subject. Having been shut up exclusively engaged in this business, I...
I had an interview with Lord Mulgrave yesterday on the late seizure of ⟨ou⟩;r vessels, which I am sorry to observe presented the prospect of a less favorable ⟨r⟩;esult than I had anticipated from the preceeding one. He asserted the principle ⟨i⟩;n the fullest extent, that a neutral power had no right to a commerce, with the colonies of an enemy in time of war, which it had not in time of...
I enclose you a press copy of my letter to you of the 14th. wh. I find however was not dated in the original sent by Liverpool. The postscript of the original is supplied by my official letter wh. accompanies this. I send this copy being anxious you shod. see the considerations wh. influence me at this time, or rather embarrass me. If I was to give an opinion as to the course to be taken, or...
Two incidents occurr’d in the course of the last session of our Assembly which are worthy some attention. These were, the attack on the Executive respecting the disbursements of the publick money, and the meetings which took place in the Capitol towards the close of the session of some of the members from the western counties for the purpose of promoting a dismemberment of the State. The first...
I have just received your letter of the 13th. of January, relative to the trial of Captain Whitby, of which you desire me to obtain a postponement if possible. I shall accordingly address a note to Lord Howick on the subject, as soon as I can prepare it. The note shall be sent to him tomorrow or next day, and I shall not fail to give it all the aid I can in personal conference. I hope the...
I requested Major Coleman to enclose you lately 300. dolrs. which are intended as a remitance or deposit to enable Mr. Livingston to purchase two swords, one for the heir of Genl. Campbell the other for John Jouett, for services rendered in the course of our revolutionary war. You will receive herewith a letter to Mr. L. on that subject which you will be so good as peruse, seal & forward him...
Since my last Callendar has been twice with me. He called in the morning on friday last and appeared so agitated that I requested him to call again, hoping he might be more composed. He returnd in the evening in the same temper, so that I thought it best to hear what he had to say, that our communication might be concluded on the subject of the interview. He complained that no positive order...
Major James Barbour of Orange has lately intimated a desire that I wod. make you acquainted with his wish to visit Europe in some station, in which he might render service while it contributed to defray his expence. The consulate, & the comn. to adjust claims with Spain are the objects to which his attention is directed. I think him a young man of genius & good capacity for business, and have...
We have the honor to transmit herewith inclosed a Duplicate of our last under date of the 11th. instant. Some circumstances have since occurred with which it is proper that you should be made acquainted. On the 13th. we dined with Lord Grenville at his house in Downing Street, where we met the Lord Chancellor, Lord Howick, Lord Auckland, Marquis Wellesley, Lord Holland, Mr. Erskine, and...
I arrived here last night in seven days from Paris which I left on the 8th. It is necessary to write forward two days in advance to Bayonne, to make arrangments for the mules which are to take me to Madrid. The intermediate country or the greater part of it is said to be almost a desert. There are but few taverns on the route and those furnish neither beds provisions or other accomodation than...
My publick letter of the 23. acknowledges the rect. of yours of 15th april containg. instructions for Spain. My private one of June 10th. communicated the incidents attending Mr. Livingstons trip to this country, as far as they were known to me, with my opinion of the probable effect of it. From every information that I can obtain, it seems clear that it has given to the govt. very great...
As it appeared by what occurred in my interview with Mr Fox on the 28. ulto. that some weeks at least would elapse before I could hope to bring our business to any conclusion I thought it proper to make a formal application to him on the 31. for an order to Suspend the Seizure and condemnation of our vessels on the principle of the late decrees. I had not requested this in explicit terms...
The king has been several weeks and still continues to be dangerously ill. The report of his phisicians has been latterly favorable to his recovery, but the result by those who pretend to be best informed considered doubtful. No communication on the subject has been made to Parliament, nor will be while it can be avoided. It is said that the house of commons has been well attended lately in...
I informed you lately in a short note by Mr. Clark who sailed in the Remitance, of the death of Mr. Pitt which took place last week. The King hath since resolved to commit the administration to the opposition as we are informed by all the gazettes of this day. It is said that he announc’d this to Lord Grenville yesterday and authorised him in conjuncion with Mr. Fox to form a new ministry from...
I have the pleasure to enclose you my letter on the subject of the treaty, in conformity with what passed between us when I was at Washington. I have had many other objects to attend to or I should have sent it to you much sooner. I have to repeat what I mentioned to you at Washington, that if there should be any remark in it which in the slightest degree departed from the friendship & respect...
Within a few days past I have received your letters of the 29. of July, the first addressed to Mr. Livingston & myself, the second to me singly, with seperate letters to him & Mr. Pinckney, & also your letter to me of the 29. of september. These are the only communications that I have recd. from you since my arrival in this country. The letters to Mr. Livingston & Mr. Pinckney shall be...
The late struggle in the parliament has produc’d the appointment of Mr. Pitt to the place of Mr. Addington, of Ld. Harrowby to that of Ld. Hawkesbury, the latter being removd to the home department from wh. Mr. Yorke retired, and Lord Melville to the head of the admiralty, in the room of Ld. St. Vincent. Not many other changes are made, the present ministry being formed principally of Mr. Pitt...
Jas. Monroe presents his best respects to Mr. Madison & requests he will be so good as forward the enclosed to Mr. Lee. As it is in answer to a proposition of his for supplying the State with arms wh. are not wanted at present, but in arrangments for wh. he may incur some expence it is desirable that he receive it as soon as possible. J. M hopes that Mr. & Mrs. Madison are in good health....
On my return from Albemarle two days since I found the enclosed from Mr. Forbes which I beg to submit to yr. consideration. I was well acquainted with Mr. Forbes in France, and considered him one of the best informed & most deserving of our countrymen at that time in that country. He was educated at Cambridge in Mass: and bred to the law, wh. he declined in favor of commerce, having at the...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Blake consul at St. Domingo who is represented to me by respectable authority to have rendered useful service to his country in that office. I am persuaded on inquiry into the character and services of this gentleman, you will find him what I believe him to be on the authority of his introduction to me, very deserving of yr. attention and...
On the 21. I desired an interview of Lord Harrowby for the purpose of “ascertaining the sentiments and disposition of his majesty’s govt. on the subjects depending between the two nations” to which I recd. an answer the next day appointing the 29. for the meeting. I expect on that occasion either to conclude the business for the present by a postponment of it, or in case of agreement, to fix...
A bill wh. has been presented before the house of Reps. has produc’d much sensation here; I cannot say any thing positive as to the effect, as the principle of the bill seems to find no support in the country among the people. On the presumption that a particular measure alluded to in mine of the 2d. by Captn. Tompkins, had taken place, I was desirous that a certain other one shod. be taken...
I have the honor to transmit to you by Doctr. Bullus a copy of my correspondence with Mr Canning on the subject which was committed to my care by your letter of the 6th. July last. You will find by it that the pressure which has been made on this Government, in obedience to the instructions contained in that letter, has terminated in a decision to send a Minister to the U States, to adjust the...
I wrote you at great length by Havre on the 13th. by Mr. Hughes who was charged with the treaty. This will be forwarded by Mr. derieux by whom it was intended to have sent the original instruments, but he being forc’d to take the route of Bordeaux, and an opportunity offering by Havre, we committed them to Mr. Hughes, & send copies by Mr. Derieux. I detained this Latter gentn. here some days...
The letter enclosed was sent to the tavern for Mr. Beckley, but the tavern keeper omitted to give it to him. Will you be so good as deliver that to him personally if at Washington. I communicated to Mr. Jefferson the wish of David Gelston for employment in the collectorship at New York, & he told me, he wod. be attended to. He is a very honest, respectable republican, one to whom the cause is...
The trial of Captain Whitby took place on the 17th. inst. at Portsmouth, before a Court Martial, by which he was acquitted. As I have not heard from Mr. Canning since the decision, and no statement is given in the gazettes, of the proceedings of the court, it is not in my power to inform you, on what ground he was acquitted. I shall endeavor to obtain correct information on that point, which I...
I have lately rece[i]ved by Mr. Baring your letters of the 5th. & 16. of Jany: that of Octr. 24th. with the documents mentioned in it had reached me at an earlier period. I rejoice to hear that our government has obtaind complete & quiet possession of Louisiana. Independant of the vast importance of the acquisition, which surely cannot be held in too high estimation, it is very satisfactory to...
I wrote you on the 16th. in haste by the “John Bulkley” a letter in which I observed that in making the question of right with this govt. it might perhaps be best to take at this time the most moderate ground. As those terms are indefinite and may be misunderstood, some explanation may be necessary to convey an idea of what I shod. consider in that light. The seizure is a positive violation of...
Since my publick letter of the 16. I have recd. yr. private one of July 30th. with the originals of those of the 29th. They were sent from Paris by Mr. Livingston who expressed his satisfaction to find that our conduct had been approved in the great outline and surprise at the intimation it conveyed of a wish that the money intended for France had been so applied. He had not then (28. octr.)...
I expected to have had the pleasure of see[i]ng you before this in my route to New Yk., but a late indisposition and the pressure of my private concerns, compell me to postpone a visit to my friends to the claims of business which will lead me first to the westward. The day of my departure is not positively fixed, but will be in a few days. I shall pass thro’ the federal city in March when I...
I wrote you on the 16. & 18th. from Bordeaux so fully as to leave nothing to be added here, except that I am still in health & to proceed on my journey in the morning, every preparation being made for the voyage such as guards procured, bedding & provisions bought &ce, in the same manner as if I was to travel thro a desert country. It is understood that Spain has declared war agnst England at...