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I have had the pleasure to receive yours of Octr. 26. and shall not fail to bring with me the articles mentioned in it from Jones the Instrument maker in Holborn. I am much indebted to you that the sum they will cost on an old account so that that matter will rest of course for the present.   I am very thankful to you for the information given me respecting the state of my affrs. in Albemarle....
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Voss of Culpepper county, a young man of merit, who has expressd a wish of being personally known to you. He is a lawyer by profession, of respectable standing at the bar, and a fair prospect of becoming eminent if he pursues his profession. He intends making a visit this spring to the south, and hearing that it is proposed to adjust the...
At the request of Mr. Arthur Lee of Norfolk I have given him an introduction to you, but not knowing his object, think proper to mention that I do not, as the contrary might otherwise be inferrd. He is in my opinion a young man of merit, tho it is not founded on much acquaintance with him. He deliver’d an oration not long since which was well spoken of, and is a republican. He is however...
Altho’ it is not yet decided whether I shall sail this fall or not to the UStates, as I most earnestly wish to do, yet I cannot neglect the opportunity by Col: Mercer, to add something to you which it is possible may not be in any other letters. It was my intention as I intimated by Captn. Dulton, to sail immediately after my arrival here, & nothing wod. have prevented it but the seizure of...
I returned from Albemarle on saturday & had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 28. ulto. on Monday last. I perceive that the idea which I suggested of a new and decisive effort, to avert the dangers interior & exterior of the present crisis, by a special mission to France & England, has not obtained your approbation. As the idea was suggested without illustration you will permit me to...
The inclosed was lately sent me by Col: Newton to be forwarded to you. Since my last R. Evers Lee has been here and a suitable occasion presenting itself, I confered with him on the subject of the comr of bankruptcy at Norfolk, in which he informed me that William Bennett a merchant the brother of the person mentioned in my last was the most suitable of the two. He lamented that there was no...
Your favor of May 4th. was presented to me on the 24th. ulto. by Mr Pinkney. That of March 16th. has not yet reached me. You are so good as to offer me either of the governments of Louisiana & to intimate that they shall be kept open sometime for my answer. I should be very sorry if any injurious delay proceeded from that cause; I hasten therefore to prevent it. At one time I was inclined to...
I communicated to you, when I had last the pleasure to see you, that during the late conspiracy of the slaves in this state, I had, by advice of the Council, ordered a guard, consisting of a subaltern and suitable number of men over the deposit of Arms and military Stores of the United States at New London , which would be continued until you had made some disposition of those Arms, which...
Dr. Barraud who will present you this is a very respectable citizen & able physician of Norfolk. Having been intrusted with the care of the marine hospital at that port, he thinks it incumbent on him to make some communications relative to it to the Executive of the UStates, for which purpose he makes a visit to the seat of govt. you will I am well persuaded find his communication very...
I have inclosed you the papers relative to the British Consul at Norfolk, in the affr. of the man who was sent to the Island and as reported executed, for mutiny on bd. a British ship. In a private letter sometime since I submitted to you a question respecting the mode of correspondence to be observed, between the Executive of the Genl. Govt. and a state, in wh. I gave my opinion freely. I...
There are two persons in this place who according to the information I have recd., have respectable claims to the office in question. The first of these is Jacob I. Cohen , a Jew but sound in his principles, of fair character & much employed in the business of the corporation. the other is Tarlton W. Pleasants , a brother of the clerk of the h. of Delegates , of equally fair character, and...
Our correspondence will be printed today in a pamphlet, a copy of which shall be sent to you by the mail if it is completed in time. I have omitted in the publication every passage which had been noted by you, and added to the list of omissions, one passage, in your letter of April 11th. which speaks of the use made of my name for vindictive purposes, the publication of which could only serve...
On information of the death of John Page which gained general belief here, I wrote you a letter two days since, which had relation to an object connected with that event. The present accounts contradict that report & as I hope & believe on good ground. I hasten therefore to correct the error into which I had been led.   You are I presume by this time return’d to Washington. I hope that you...
I have just returned from Richmond & send the inclosed for yr. inspection in the hope that you may not have set-out to day for Washington, knowing that you have heretofore frequently staid a day longer than that which you had appointed for your departure to arrange more completely your private affairs. I take the liberty to submit to your perusal a copy of my letters to Mr. Randolph, being the...
I returned on friday from Albemarle without having accomplished the object of my trip by the sale of my land above Charlottesville. In my absence an alarm took place at Norfolk relative to the negroes, wh. was felt here, but which seems to have little foundation for it. Such is the state of things that it is hasardous for me, in regard to the publick opinion, to be absent from this place at...
Our communication will be laid before the assembly to morrow with its doors closed. The objection which I suggested applied to a delegation of any confidence or trust over the subject, from the legislature to our Executive, not to the agency of the federal Executive in the affair. In the latter view I saw no objection to the clause, for what was proposed in that respect was precisely what the...
Mr. Halsey a respectable citizen of R Island who has been some years in Europe, will have the pleasure to present you this. He has been introduc’d to me as a young man of merit, of the best connections at home, and expressing a desire of being known to you, I take the liberty of giving him this letter stating his pretentions in the light, they have appear’d to me, and to add that what I have...
I enclose you some columns of a paper here edited by Mr. Callendar. It was whispered sometime since that the federalists knew he was possessed of some letters from you , and were endeavouring to bring them before the publick. In several of his preceding papers he glancd at the subject , but at length enters more directly on it. Perhaps it will be best that nothing shod. be said in reply by any...
Colo. David Lambert of this city has requested me to communicate to you his desire to be employ’d as a comr. of banruptcy, with which I readily comply. He is a respectable citizen who has held several offices of credit, among wh. is the command of the rgt. of the city which he lately voluntarily resigned; he was comr. under the act for choosing Electors of P. & V. Presidt., & has been a comr....
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. as he sits out to Richmond to morrow or next day, & will probably not see him before his departure, he will thank Mr Jefferson for information on the following subjects. The state of Maryld. has set up a claim to the territory lying within this State no. the so. Branch of Potowk., on the principle that the so. branch is her true boundary. She...
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. If he has a moment of leisure, he will thank him for a few words on the subject of a note he left at Monticello yesterday, in addition to wh. he begs to trouble him with the inclosed. If the accommodation wh. it proposes can be given, it will essentially forward the arming of the militia of the State. He will be happy to bear Mr. Jefferson’s...
I did not receive yours of the 9th. till the day before yesterday (15). I am sorry it will not be in my power to see you while at home. many considerations of a publick nature keep me here for the present, the most urgent of wh. is, the trials which are in train in several parts of the state of slaves on the charge of conspiracy & insurrection, and the applications growing out of them for...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 11th. instant the day after I returned from Albemarle. It is very distressing to me to discuss with you the topicks on which it treats, but in the state in which things are it is certainly best to come to a perfect understanding on every point & to repair on both sides any injury which may have been received. To do you an injury or indeed any one...
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. As the person for whose benefit the enclosed was intended has left this for Washington it is thought best to return it. It is presumed that every thing appertaing. to that object will be settled at Washington with that person; but shod. the contrary be the case, and it be proper to execute any thing here, J.M. will with pleasure attend to it when...
I send you by Mr. Law a book from a Mr. Williams of this place who was presented to me by Mr. Barlow, as an old friend of Dr. Franklin. He appears to be a well enformed worthy man. If you chuse to answer it I will present the answer. He stood ill with his govt. some years since, but is on tolerable footing with it now. Your answer if you send one will certainly be spoken of, tho’ I presume not...
It is painful to touch on other topicks but I shod. feel myself deficient in candor if I did not observe that at no period of my life was I ever subjected to more inquietude than I have suffered since my return from Spain. I have found myself plac’d in a situation thro’ the whole of this interval altogether unexpected & in consideration of the parties to it equally novel. It was my wish to...
My great anxiety to forward to you the account and receit for the sum which I paid for your mathematical instruments at London, when I should acknowledge your kind letter of the 18th, prevented my answering it sooner. To obtain them I was forced to ransack all my papers, which required much time, & in truth I did not succeed in finding them till this morning. I have now the pleasure to inclose...
Mr. Fenwick has requested me to state to you what I know of his conduct while acting under my ministry with the French republick. Altho’ it wod. be more agreeable that no appeal shod. be made to me on subjects of the kind yet it is impossible to withhold my evidence where it is called for by the party interested, especially under circumstances like the present. When I went to France Mr....
I am inclined to think the mode by which a certain end is to be accomplished, refering to a subject in discussion when I last saw you, is of less importance than I then thought it. A gradual operation will not offend republicans, nor will an off-hand entire one, make friends of the tories. Sooner or later that party will rally and make another effort. That course which best preserves, at the...
I have been requested by Colo. Goodall who is an honest republican character, I presume well known to you, to add his name to the list of candidates for the post office in this city. You will get correct information of every one not known to you from our members in Congress. In a late letter to Mr. Madison I gave the details of some federal intrigues here during the Session of our assembly. He...
On my return lately from Albemarle I found yr. favors of the 15. 17. & 20th. wh. were unopened according to orders I had left in such cases. An attack from Callendar is a harmless thing unsupported by any document from yrself. From such letters as you wrote him I do not think any thing is to be hoped to him or the federalists. If the printers wod. say nothing in reply to the attacks of that...
Yours of june 15th. was recd. on my arrival here. Mr. Gamble has not been here that I can learn. Shod. he come while I am here I shall most certainly pay him the attention you desire. I have conferr’d with Mr. Carey respecting the documents concerning the war in our southern states which you committed to him for publication, & send his apology in a letter to me for not having answered yr....
I was requested by the General Assembly at its last Session to transmit to the President of the United States, a copy of my communication to it, with the documents accompanying it, relative to the conduct of the Britith Consul at Norfolk, who was charged with having received a man of a Magistrate of the Borough of Norfolk, said to have confessed himself one of the Mutineers on board the...
Jas. Monroe is happy to inform Mr. Jefferson that Joseph Scott the person lately appointed Marshall for this district, is the brother of Genl. Scott of Kentuckey. He was an officer through the revolutionary war, dangerously wounded in one of its battles by which he lost the use of one of his arms, is respectable for his talents, of fair and upright character, and sound in his political...
From some distant allusion it was inferr’d that Mr. Hay wod. not act as a comr. of bankruptcy. The proposition was not directly made, so that he did not refuse; it was only inferr’d that it was not an office which he was desirous of. I have not yet been able to form a list for Norfolk, but expect soon to do it, which shall be transmitted without delay. In the interim there is no reason why you...
My present and past employments have made me acquainted with many deserving men whose demands I cannot resist to make themselves & their views known to you. I must mention several at present with whom I stand in that predicamt. lest by withholding their pretentions longer, a reliance on me for that service might possibly expose them to injury. David Gelston of New Yk. wod. be happy to accept...
I have yours of Jany. 8. by Mr. Baring who arrived lately in the packet. From the view I am able to take of the subject I am of opinion that my appointment to Louisiana will be incompatable with the duties I am to perform in this quarter. To conclude a treaty with this govt., or to make such an experiment as wod. authorise me to say that one cannot be had, to regulate on just principles the...
I should have acknowledged the rect. of your favor containing a copy of yr. message to the congress before this had I not expected to have done it in person. It was my intention after remaining here as long, from the expiration of my late office, as was sufficient to make it known unequivocally to the publick that I was sincere in returning to the bar, to pass thro’ the federal city on my way...
The admn. likely to change its tone & I to be swept from the stage. On the 25. of April I was resolved to press the business with more earnestness than I had done; to remind Mr. Fox of his engagmts & thro’ him produce some effect in the Cabinet. In that state he found it necessary to secure quiet somewhere & asked me if Mr. M. or Mr K. were coming over. I verily believed that no one was coming...
I had yours of the 7th. by yesterday’s mail. The danger of reaction is the evil to be fear’d from an energetic course, of disgusting and disuniting the republican party by an opposit one. These are the rocks, (to use a worn out metaphor) which you have to shun and which it is not easy to shun, but which may be done. On which side is the greater danger? In my judgement the latter. On which side...
I enclose you a resolution of the General Assembly of this Commonwealth, of the last session, by which it is made my duty to correspond with you on the subject of obtaining by purchase lands without the limits of this state, to which persons obnoxious to the laws or dangerous to the peace of society may be removed. This resolution was produced by the conspiracy of the slaves which took place...
I had intended writing you on a subject mentioned in my last , but when I came to act on it I found it an affair of more personal delicacy than I had anticipated. Between the person referr’d to and myself nothing ever occurr’d to restrain me from expressing my sentiments freely on any subject in wh. the publick were interested, but yet I feel that I shod. be the last person in the world who...
I enclose you some resolutions of the General Assembly of this Commonwealth, passed at its last session explanatory of a resolution of the preceding session authorizing a correspondence with you relative to the purchase of lands without the limits of the state, to which persons obnoxious to its laws or dangerous to the peace of society might be removed. You will recollect that as the precise...
Immediately after you left Albemarle, I was forc’d to go to Loudoun to make some arrangements in the estate with which I am charged there, & having returned by the same route, I did not reach this place till yesterday late at night. I had not therefore the pleasure to receive your kind favors of the 12th. & 13. till to day. The papers noted in your letters to me shall most certainly be omitted...
I find by your letter of the 3d., that you think Sierra Leone on the Coast of Affrica a suitable place for the establishment of our insurgent slaves, that it may also become so for those who are or may hereafter be emancipated, and that you are disposed to obtain the assent of the company to such a measure through our minister in London, while your attention will be directed in the interim to...
In my communications to Mr. Madison publick & private which you would see, I have been so full, that it seemed as if I shod. only trouble you by a repetition of the same ideas in writing you. I most earnestly hope that what is done here, and may be done in Spain, will not only prove an ample vindication of the measures of yr. administration during the last Session of Congress, when contrasted...
I find among the papers in the council chamber an acct. adjusted by you between Houdon and the Commonwealth. Perhaps you have a copy of it at Monticello, which may be the document to which you wish to recur before you decide on his claim. If this paper is material it shall be sent to you, tho’ to me it appears as if it cod. not be, as the sole or principal question is, what the depreciation...
Hearing that Mr. Hay is disposed to seize the few days of leasure which an interval between the courts gives him, to visit the federal city with his lady and that he doubts whether you wod. recognize him, I take a pleasure in fre’ing him from that anxiety. He is really a very able and respectable citizen, one who deserves and will be highly gratified with your attention. At what time will you...
When lately in Albemarle I found the complition of a chmney in my house delayd by the want of abt. 350. bricks, which were not to be had in the neighbourhood. As the number is too small to burn a kiln on purpose to obtain them and as it may possibly be in my power to replace them sometime hereafter when you may have occasion, if convenient, I will thank you for as many. sincerely I am your...
The opportunity by Mr. Bankhead is too favorable not to be taken advantage of to write you, altho I may be able to add but little to what you find in my official dispatches. The business here has been suspended since the late appointment was known & will remain so till Mr. Pinkney arrives. It was impossible for me to move in it after that event, either with propriety or effect. besides it...