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    • Madison, James
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    • Monroe, James
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Mr. Camp handed me yesterday your two favors of the 11 & 12 of March. I can say nothing determinate as to the prospect of him & Mr. Lambert, because I do not yet know what arrangements may be contemplated throughout the Departments. I think however it would be unwise in any of the Candidates to neglect other resources; the number of them being such as greatly to reduce the chance to...
I have recd. your favor of the 23 Ult. Callendar made his appearance here some days ago in the same temper which is described in your letter. He seems implacable towards the principal object of his complaints and not to be satisfied in any respect, without an office. It has been my lot to bear the burden of receiving & repelling his claims. What feelings may have been excited by my plain...
The inclosed came last evening in a packet from Bourdeau. By the same conveyance I have a letter from Dawson of May 27. at Paris. Every appearance assured him that the convention would be ratified. Letters from King of May 30. & June 1 represent the British Govt. as in dispositions equally favorable. They have given peremptory orders to their W. Inda. cruisers to abstain from the Captures...
I have your two favors of the 11 & 15. instant. The letter inclosed in the first is returned, Mr. Livingston having sailed before it could reach N. Y. and the letter for which it was to be substituted, having before gone on to him. The letter inclosed in the latter is also inclosed, with a note at the bottom of it by the President which will serve for an answer. We think the best mode of...
General Mason has just requested me to forward the inclosed 100 dolrs. to be put into the hands of Mr. S. Pleasants for Mr. Callander. Yrs. affy. RC ( NhHi ). Virginia senator Stevens Thomson Mason was an active supporter of Callender’s cause (see Michael Durey, “ With the Hammer of Truth ”: James Thomson Callender and America’s Early National Heroes [Charlottesville, Va., 1990], pp. 110–11,...
The Bearer Mr. Eli Whitney has been introduced to me by a letter from Mr. Pierpont Edwards, as an eminent Mathematical & Mechanical genius, and otherwise highly respectable. Of his Mechanical ingenuity he has given a valuable specimen in his invention of a machine for separating Cotton from its seed. He will probably converse with you on the subject of making fire arms, in which he is also an...
I beg leave to inclose you a complaint transmitted to this Department by the Agent of the U. States at Jamaica, of certain frauds in the case of flour shipped to that Island. As the facts stated have reference to places within the State of Virginia, it is thought most proper to communicate them to you, who will be best able to decide on the manner & measure of enquiry due to the subject. With...
I have not yet thanked you for the copy of your Message, which I find has attracted attention, and circulates with advantage to yourself, as well as to the public. It is much to be wished that the same manly and enlarged sentiments, and the same just and enlightened policy, might distinguish the addresses of all the Republican Governors, and co-operate with the example set by the President, in...
I have this moment recd yours of the 14th. instant. The letter from Mr. Purviance which I herein return is a favorable specimen of his stile & sentiments. Mr. Jones will explain to you the occasion & object of my enquiries. I have as yet formed no final determination in the case, & there is a possibility tho not a probability that it may be rendered unnecessary. Mr. Dawson as you will see has...
31 January 1802, Washington. Introduces Prince Ruspoli, who has been recommended by Mr. King and through him by Mr. West. Ruspoli “proposes to make an excursion from Richmond, by the way of Monticello, to the Natural bridge; & returning thence, to proceed thro’ Norfolk to Charl[e]stown by water.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Incomplete. Docketed by Monroe.
I now return the letters to you from Mr. Purviance & Cambaceres, with an acknowledgment of those in which they were inclosed. The papers last recd. from you in relation to Mr. Skipwith will be of use in establishing one or two material points. His case has been a hard one, but it may be questioned whether he be well founded in the extent of his claims for interest & Agency for Claims. The...
29 November 1802, Department of State, Washington. “I beg the favor of you to insert Mr. christian name, in the enclosed commission, to send it to him and inform me of the name you shall insert.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, DL , vol. 14). 1 p. Left blank in letterbook. This was probably James Nimms. In a 2 Dec. 1802 note to JM, Jefferson wrote: “Mr. Nimms the Commr. of bkrptcy appointed for...
Inclosed herewith is the Cypher you are to carry with you. I send it apart from the despatches, because I shall put a few words in them into Cypher. The despatches will probably go off on wednesday morning, or thursday at farthest. They have been delayed by the slowness of Congs. in passing the law for which they waited. I recd. last evening yours of the 22d. & expect to hear further from you...
Since you left us we have no further intelligence from N. Orleans, except a letter dated Jany 20 from the vice Consular agent there, from which it appears that the letters to the Govr. & Intendant from the Spanish Minister here, had arrived abt. the 13th. and had not on the 20th. produced the desired change in the state of things. The delay however does not seem to have been viewed by the...
The inclosed came under cover of one to me from Mr. Coleman. The final communications to you will be put into the mail tomorrow, and will get to N Y. on sunday. Our utmost exertions could not send them off by this evenings mail. The bill before Congs. which is to be forwarded to you, required some formalities; and it passed a day or two ago only. Yrs affly. RC ( DLC ). Signature clipped....
You will herewith receive a Commission and letters of Credence, one of you as Minister Plenipotentiary, the other as Minister Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, to treat with the Government of the French Republic, on the Subject of the Mississipi, and the Territories Eastward thereof, and without the limits of the United States. The object in view is to procure by just and satisfactory...
You will herewith receive two Commissions, with the Correspondent Instructions, in which you are associated as Minister Plenipotentiary and Extraordinary to the French Republic and to his Catholic Majesty; together with the respective letters of Credence to those Governments. The allowance for this service will be a salary, at the rate of Nine thousand dollars a year. The general rule which...
You will be herewith furnished with a joint Commission to treat with His Catholic Majesty, and with a letter of credence to him. For the object of the Commission and as a guide to your negotiations, I refer you to the instructions given in relation to the French Government. Whatever portion of the arrangements contemplated may be found to depend not on the French, but on the Spanish...
The chart from which the enclosed was copied is contained in a collection made for the Department of State by Arrowsmith of London. The soundings and other minute circumstances, relative to the northern coast of the Bay of Mexico and the Islands situated in it, have induced the belief that it may prove serviceable to you. With very great respect, I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obed....
A month having elapsed since the departure of M Monroe it may be presumed that by the time this reaches you communications will have passed with the French government sufficiently explaining its views towards the United States and preparing the way for the ulterior instructions which the President thinks proper should now be given. In case a conventional arrangement with France should have...
The reasonable and friendly views with which you have been instructed by the President to enter into negociations with the French Government justify him in expecting from them an issue favorable to the tranquillity and to the useful relations between the two Countries. It is not forgotten however that these views, instead of being reciprocal, may find, on the part of France, a temper adverse...
You will receive with this all the communications claimed by the actual & eventual posture of our affairs in the hands of yourself & Mr. Livingston. You will find also that the Spanish Govt. has pretty promptly corrected the wrong done by its Officer at N. Orleans. This event will be a heavy blow to the clamorors for war, and will be very soothing to those immediately interested in the trade...
I commit to your care the inclosed letters & papers for Genl. Fayette which are left open for your perusal. We have just recd. the Message of his B. Majesty which is represented as the signal of a certain rupture with France. From the positions taken by the parties, both diplomatic & military, such an event seems scarcely avoidable. I hope we shall be wise enough to shun their follies, and...
Since my last which was of April 18th the tenor of our information from France and Great Britain renders a war between those powers in the highest degree probable. It may be inferred at the same time from the information given by Mr. Livingston and Mr. King that the importance of the United States is rising fast in the estimation both of the French and British cabinets and that Louisiana is as...
I have recd. your favor of the 9th. April, which gave us the first notice of your arrival in France. The moment of it, according to the posture of things between the two great rival powers as represented by our Ministers, must have been peculiarly critical. The information cited from King in my public letter marks the source from which the British cabinet begins to take counsel on subjects...
Your several letters to Apl. 19. have been recd. The dawn of your negociations has given much pleasure and much expectation . We wait with anxiety your next despatches, which will probably disclose the precise prospect if not the result in form . The crisis as seen here has been auspicious and I am persuaded that you will have seised [ sic ] and pushed its advantages . The purchase of the
Your dispatches including the Treaty and two Conventions signed with a French Plenipotentiary on the 30th of April were safely delivered on the 14th by Mr. Hughes, to whose care you had committed them. In concurring with the disposition of the French Government to treat for the whole of Louisiana although the western part of it was not embraced by your powers you were justified by the solid...
The communications by Mr. Hughes including the Treaty and conventions signed with the French Government were safely delivered on the 14th. instant. Inclosed is a copy [of] a letter written in consequence of them to Mr. Livingston and yourself. On the presumption which accords with the information given by Mr. Hughes that you will have proceeded to Madrid in pursuance of the instructions of the...
I recd your favor of by Mr. Hughs, the bearer of the public dispatches from you & Mr L. The purchase of Louisiana in its full extent, tho’ not contemplated is received with warm, & in a manner universal approbation. The uses to which it may be turned, render it a truly noble acquisition. Under prudent management it may be made to do much good as well as to prevent much evil. By lessening the...
I returned to this City on the 24th. The President arrived the day after. General Dearbourn was here before. Messrs. Gallatin & Smith are daily expected. We have reassembled a little earlier after our full vacation than usual, in order to be the more prepared for the earlier meeting of Congress. The last letter recd. from you was of the 11th. of Augst by Mr. Baring who forwardd. that with the...
I have recieved your several letters down to Augt. 11th. The considerations on which you declined proceeding to Madrid have all the weight with the president which you allowed to them . It is accordingly his instruction that you remain at London notwithstanding my letter of July 29. until the contrary be signified to you, or until you shall find in a change of circumstances a clear invitation...
Finding that [ sic ] Mr. Purveyance within reach of a few lines, I add these to what he is already charged with, to observe that Yrujo has written another remonstrance agst. our acquisition of Louisiana, alledging as a further objection that France by not obtaining the stipulated acknowledgmts. of the King of Etruria from the courts of Petersburg & London had a defective title herself to the...
I have received from you letters of the following dates written after your arrival in London, viz the 19th 20th & 26th July, the 11 & 15th August. I have the pleasure to inform you that the Treaty for Louisiana has been ratified in form, and is now before both Houses, for the Legislative provisions necessary with respect to the Stock, to taking possession, and to Governing the Country. There...
The case committed to the care of Mr. Erving in the inclosed letter (which I beg you to hand to him) being marked with very peculiar circumstances, I have thought it expedient also to request your advice to him and even your own direct interposition if you are encouraged to expect a suitable effect from it. Mr. McElwee, the father of the impressed young man, feeling with just sensibility the...
You must be already acquainted with many of the circumstances respecting the purchase made in France by General Ira Allen of a quantity of Arms and field pieces which on their passage to the United States were captured towards the close of the year 1796 by the British Ship of War Audacious. General Allen having requested a recommendation of his interest to your patronage, I the more readily...
I have recd I believe all your letters public and private down to that of October 22, written merely to say that all continued well. I have taken due care of the communications on the subject of your . Every thing seems to be well understood on this side the water. I can not say more now as I write of necessity without cypher. Mr. Merry has been with us some time. He appears to be an amiable...
The information and observations which you have as yet received from me since your arrival in London, on the impressment of our seamen, and other violations of our rights, have been in private letters only. The delay in making these injuries the subject of official communications, proceeded first from an expectation that the British Government would have notified formally to the United States,...
You will herewith receive the instructions in pursuance of which you are to propose and negotiate a convention between the United States and Great Britain, on the subject of impressments and other matters interesting to the two nations; and for which this letter with your commission of Minister Plenipotentiary to his Britannic Majesty will be your authority. I have the honor to be, Sir, With...
I write you by Mr. Baring, who will also take charge of full instructions on the subject of a Convention with G. B for putting an end to impressments &c: It is of great importance to the harmony of the two Countries that the project should not entirely fail. There is not time to forward by this opportunity instructions relative to Madrid. They will probably soon follow. In the mean time, you...
I have already, in a letter by the last British packet given you a hint of the sensation produced in Mr. & Mrs. Merry, by a circumstance of Etiquette. I had supposed that it would yield to the proofs of respect & cordiality which would be experienced by them, from all in & about the Government, and to the explanations which would be superadded. I find however that the case is to be transmitted...
You will herewith receive the ratification by the President and Senate, of the Convention with the British Government signed on the 12th of May 1803, with an exception of the Vth article. Should the British Government accede to this change in the instrument, you will proceed to an exchange of ratifications and transmit the one received, without delay, in order that the proper steps may be...
In a private letter by Mr. Baring I gave you a detail of what had passed here on the subject of etiquete . I had hoped that no farther jars would have ensued as I still hope that the good sense of the British government respecting the right of the government here to fix its rules of intercourse and the sentiments and manners of the country to which they ought to be adapted will give the proper...
Since my last of Feby. 14th I have received yours of November 16. The accounts of some jar between you and the British administration, republished from the English newspapers had begun to excite here considerable attention, and comments of different kinds from different quarters. As we knew that neither your disposition, nor instructions could lead to any unfriendly or unnecessary discussions...
Since my last which went by duplicates, & will therefore I hope have been recd. yours of Novr. 25. which like this is private, has come to hand. Your public letter accompanying it, is answered publickly by this opportunity. It is very agreeable to find the British Ministers so candidly acknowledging the justice of our general conduct towards their nation and the fairness particularly of our...
It being presumed that by the time of your receiving this communication, the Negotiation with which you were charged by my letter of 5th. January last, will no longer require your presence in London, the President thinks it proper that you should now proceed to Madrid, and in conjunction with Mr. Pinckney open a negotiation on the important subjects remaining to be adjusted with the Spanish...
Being advised that the Board of Commissioners under the 7th article of the British Treaty, when they were about to make a final adjournment found that the United States were in advance the sum of five hundred and twenty six pounds four shillings and nine pence, and that they ordered it to be paid to you, I request you to be pleased to pay it over to Sir Francis Baring & Co to be applied by...
In the postscript of 18th. to my letter of the 15th of April, you were requested to suspend your departure from London for Madrid until you should be informed of the President’s views as to your destination after closing your mission to Spain . I am now enabled by the return of the President to signify to you that he yields to the reasons assigned by you for declining the appointment on this...
I inclose copies of a letter from Margaret Mitchell of New York and its inclosure, whereby it will appear that her son Andrew Mitchell, a minor, having been practised upon to induce his enlistment, is now a private in the 22d Regiment of foot, under the command of Colo. Mercer, stationed at Calcutta. Should the distress of the mother, as depicted in her letter, fail to excite a degree of...
Since the instructions given you on the 15th of April last, further views have been obtained with respect to the interior of Louisiana and the value which Spain will probably put on such a limitation of our settlements beyond the Mississippi as will keep them for some time at a distance from hers. The President has accordingly become the more anxious that in the adjustment authorized by those...
Since my last acknowledgment of your letters I have received those of . I inclose herewith several correspondences with Mr Merry, Mr Pichon and the Mayor and Marshal of New York, on certain proceedings of the British frigates Cambrian and Boston, and the sloop of war Driver within and without the harbour of New York. Copies of the documents attached to these correspondences are also inclosed,...