You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Livingston, Robert R.
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 3

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Livingston, Robert R." AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 150 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I send by this post a roll containing a patern for a coat, of cloth which Mrs. Edward P Livingston begs you wd. do her the honor to accept. It is a fine specimen of domestic manufacture, & of the superiority of Cler Mont Merino wool, as you will Judge by its being much finer than the superfine british broad cloths made from Spanish wool, since it took 1/ 4 less wool to make the same quantity...
I thank you for your favor of the 11th. which I have just now recd. I feel much more indifferent to the measures of the belligerents with respect to us than many of my fellow citizens not because I am more regardless of the general welfare but because I sincerely believe that "all things are working together for good". In our infancy we had the powerful protection we required. When we attained...
This will be delivered by my sons in Law Robert L. and Edward P Livingston. One being a senator may give you the politics of this State, & the other that of France, as far as a traveller could collect it. For myself I am content to be a mechanic & a farmer & find more pleasure in these occupations than you statesmen do in buffeting the storm that beats around you at Washington. I mentioned to...
I take the Liberty to enclose a letter to Genl. Armstrong, containing letters to my sister, & my children, which I pray you to have the goodness to forward. My extreme anxiety to let my Children hear from me, & to have them home again, must be my appology for the trouble I give you since I find that none of my letters by the Ossage reached their destination, except that which you had the...
This will be delivered by Mr. Jasper Livingston grandson of your old acquaintance Mr. Philip Livingston who died in attendance on Congress at York town, & son in law of Judge Livingston. He is established in the Island of Jamaica The office of agent for seamen being vacant by the death of Mr. Lenox, he thinks it might be of use to him in his business to have it confered upon him. As it is a...
Presuming that you will have some means of keeping open the intercourse with Genl. Armstrong, & being very anxious to inform my children in France of the necessity there is for their immediate return, I take the liberty to inclose a letter to my sister, covering one to my daughter, which I pray you to have the goodness to send with your dispatches. I should not have taken the liberty to...
Knowing that you find leasure amidst the bustle of politicks to amuse yourself with less important, but more pleasing studies, I have taken the liberty to send you the 3d Vol: of the proceedings of the society for agriculture & useful arts in this State. The first parts, I beleive I have had the honor to send you some years ago, if not, be so obliging as to let me know, & they shall be...
I ought long before this to have returned you my thanks, & those of Coll. Livingston for your kind compliance with our request in forwarding to him the passport & dispatches, with which he sailed the 21st. of last month for Bordeaux. But indeed my mind has been harrassed by anxiety on his departure, & that of my daughter & two of her children, who accompanied him. As they all lived in the...
The state of my son in law, Col. Livingstons, health compels him to make a voyage. He accordingly proposes to sail for France in the course of a fortnight at furthest, & will afford you a convenient opportunity of writing. He is very desirous of being the bearer of dispatches from you, & of obtaining your passport, as he thinks it will afford him protection against british & French privateers,...
Knowing your engagements during the session of Congress, I have not thought it proper to break in upon your time by an earlier answer to your favor of the 28 Janry. The enclosed note you will have the goodness to read, & deliver to the auditor, as it contains the only explanation I can at present give to his inquiries. I sincerely congratulate you upon the total defeat of Mr. Burrs plans, for...
I have recd. so many letters from Mr. Mitchel soliciting my interest with you in relation to his question on the consulate at Havre, for which two commissions exist that I can not but beg the favor of you to procure the presidents determination. If Mr. Barnets commission supercedes that of Mr. Mitchel I presume that he might be otherwise provided for, as he is realy an attentive & good...
I have but just received the enclosed from Mr Mitchel with a request to forward it to you. He complains in his Letter to me of Mr. Barnets exercising authority within his Jurisdiction. When a commission of Vice Consul was sent him I considered it either as a supersedins [ sic ] of Mr Barnets commission, or at least as vesting the right in Mr. Mitchel till Mr Barnet by removing to Havre put...
After my return home I made search among my papers for the catalogue of Pougens that you expressed a wish to have, & I was so fortunate as to find it. I send it with this. I mentioned to Mr Madison, in some of my letters, that there was a ballance in the hands of the bankers on the book account, which stood to my credit. I find by looking over their letters, that this ballance is fr. 1236.7....
Mr ⟨F⟩; Skipwith may probably have brought letters for me. If so I shall deem it a favor to have them sent to me at Philadelphia where I shall remain till the 23d. of this month. I saw here the new order of council relative to colonial commerce. It led me to reflect upon what you observed with respect to Russia but not only Russia but Sweden Austria & Germany are deeply interested in a change...
I received on the fifth Inst your favor of the ⟨2⟩;8th. Septr. I began immediately to unpack my papers and have been since employed in examining them, this took ⟨s⟩;ome time, as they were all unsorted & put into a trunk for the convenience of transportation. I can find none of the papers you refer to. It was my practice in all ship cases t⟨o⟩; put the papers into the hands of Mr. Skipwith for...
I arrived here with my family this Morning, having <left> Nantes the 26th. May. I should proceed to Washington as <soo>n as I had a little recovered the fatigue<s> of my voyage, <did> I not apprehend that at this season both the president & <your>self would have left it before I could arrive. I am extrem<ely> <an>xious to have the pleasure of seeing you both, & to give <you an> accomt of my...
I returned to Paris a few days ago from my tour thro Italy & Germany. When the Emperor was <o>n the point of leaving this for Milan. The day of his <de>parture I was honoured to my great surprize by the <le>tter of which the enclosed is a copy accompanied by the Emperors portrait in a gold box, very richly set with dia<m>onds of very considerable value. I made no difficulty <in> accepting this...
Being now entirely divested of my diplomatic functions it becomes my duty to Send you the concluding Scene: on Sunday Genl Armstrong & myself were admitted to a private audience when I delivered my letter of recall together with an apology for its adress to the first Consul, & referring to Genl Armstrong for the assurances of the President’s recognition of the change of Government here,...
Circumstances have prevented my availing myself of your kindness, in permitting me to retire: before this. The peculiar State of our money transactions, the critical Situation of Europe & of our own affairs with Spain, made me think it Essential to remain here till my place could be Supplied, & the rather as Mr Graham the only man in whom I had Sufficient confidence to leave our business with,...
I have just returned from the Minister’s & have the Satisfaction of informing you that he has Spoken to the Emperor on the Subject of Consular agents in their Colonies & that he has agreed to allow them during the war & has promised to Send me a note to that effect as well as to give the most precise orders on the Subject of the Depredations committed on our Commerce. I can not but think this...
As I am in daily expectation of the arrival of General Armstrong, this will probably be the last official letter which I Shall have to write. It is proper then that I Should give you a Short State of your affairs at this time. First with respect to the debt I have laboured thro’ the principal difficulties, & in ten days from this time I hope to commence the drawing of the bills—as the business...
The ambassador of Spain has this moment left me. In the course of our conversation he dropped Some things that it is important you Should know as indicative of the Sentiments of his Court & perhaps as necessary to form the basis of the measures that it may be proper immediately to take. He of course insisted that West Florida made no part of our purchase, but as he Supported this Sentiment by...
I enclose the reply of the Minister upon the Subject of the debts, it is in the language I expected, & were it not that I was in hourly expectation of the arrival of Genl Armstrong who will have your full instructions I Should reply to it, & Shew that when we assumed to pay to the amount of the 20 millions it was not intended to discharge France from any excess, Since the words of the treaty...
I have just recd the enclosed from Mr Pinkney with directions to forward them to you after having read them, which I have but just had the leisure to do as the gent who is to carry them sets off directly. They contain the only direct intelligence on the subject of our affairs in Spain that I have recd. Mr. Pinkneys letters to me having never reached me. Tho the conveyance by which you will...
Since my last Mr d’Oubril has received an answer to the Note of the Emperor of Russia; this answer not only refuses all Satisfaction on the points raised by him, But recriminates in Strong terms & charges Alexander with having himself violated the Convention between the nations, in giving protection to the ennemies of France, & in taking possession of the Grecian Isles &c. In consequence of...
Since my letter of yesterday I have received the enclosed note on the Subject of the trade with hispaniola: You will find in it a certain degree of asperity, which I feared from the Soreness that they yet feel relative to that Island, & the massacre of which they have just heard: But as this note was written too Soon after the receipt of mine to admit of any communication with the Emperor who...
I yesterday received your letter of 26th of June announcing the appointment of Genl Armstrong as my Successor, & covering a letter of leave to the First Consul . Notwithstanding my wish to go at an earlier period, I found it impossible in then [ sic ] State of our affairs, as I knew no person with whom I could leave the charge. I had hoped to have prevailed on Mr Graham, but he refused to...
Nothing extraordinary has occurred Since my last, a duplicate of which you will receive with this, as I find Some errors in the copy Sent you; if you have received it, be pleased to correct it by the duplicate: I had Strong hopes while in England that a change of Ministry would take place, in which case we Should doubtless have had peace; at present, Mr Pitt appears to be able to Stand his...
A courier has just arrived from Russia. The emperor demands the fulfilment of certain secret articles in his treaty with France among which are compensation for the king of Sardinia the perfect independance of the Italian states the affairs of Germany to be regulated jointly between them and as a consequence of it the withdrawing the troops from Hanover or the Russian chargé d’affaires is to...
Since my last 24 June, I have in pursuance of your instructions put in the enclosed notes on the Subject of the Convention, I have yet received no Such official answer as will Justify my further proceedings, since till they determine either to open the negotiation you require, or reject it or till they consent to a partial draft. Mr Talleyrand is now absent, & Mr Marbois’s powers do not go to...