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Th. Jefferson presents his respects to Mr. Adams and incloses him a letter which came to his hands last night; on reading what is written within the cover, he concluded it to be a private letter, and without opening a single paper within it he folded it up & now has the honor to inclose it to Mr Adams, with the homage of his high consideration and respect. MHi : Adams Papers.
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. My charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796, I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieved, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it: perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive....
I have duly recieved your letter of the 28th. of July expressing a wish that your brother could find some emploiment in New Orleans in which his knolege of the French and Spanish languages might be made useful. it would have been pleasing to me to have been able to point out such an emploiment, & more so to add that any such was within my powers of appointment, but the only appointments I make...
Thomas Jefferson , President of the United States of America, To all who shall see these presents, Greeting : Know Ye , That reposing especial trust and confidence in the patriotism, integrity and abilities of James Madison of Virginia, I have nominated, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, do appoint him Secretary of State, and do authorize and empower him to execute and...
I offer you my sincere condolances on the melancholy loss, which has detained you at home: and am entirely sensible of the necessities it will have imposed on you for further delay. Mr. Lincoln has undertaken the duties of your office per interim, and will continue till you can come. Genl. Dearborn is in the War Department. Mr. Gallatin, though unappointed, has staid till now to give us the...
I am still here. Three refusals of the Naval Secretaryship have been re[c]ieved, and I am afraid of recieving a 4th. this evening from mr. Jones of Phila. In that case Genl. Smith has agreed to take it pro tempore, so as to give me time; and I hope the moment it is in either his or Jones’s hands, to get away; but this may be yet three four or five days. Lincoln is doing the duties of your...
I shall be with you on the 25th. unless health or weather prevent. But if you propose leaving home sooner for Washington, do not let my coming prevent you. Only, in that case, if convenient, lodge word at Gordon’s, or write me by next post, that you will be gone; as I should then wish to lengthen my day’s journey. I have not been able to look yet into my newspapers, but I presume yours contain...
I received yesterday your’s of the 22d. & learn with regret that you have been so unwell. This & the state of the ⟨country, the river &⟩ roads should delay your departure, at least till the weather is better. I should have set out this morning, but it is still raining, and the river all but ⟨swimm⟩ing at the last ford. If these circumstances are more favorable tomorrow I shall then set out, or...
I hasten the return of the bearer that he may meet you at Brown’s and convey you information as to the road. From Songster’s I tried the road by Ravensworth, which comes into the turnpike road 4½ miles below Fairfax courthouse. There are about 2 miles of it which I think cannot be passed by your carriage without oversetting; and consulting with Colo. Wren who knows both roads, he says there is...
A person of the name of Thompson, of Amherst county in Virginia has asked my interference for the recovery of his son John Thompson understood to be impressed on board the Squirrel a British vessel of war. The inclosed letter gave him the first information he has recieved from him for some time past, for so long a time indeed that he had apprehended he was dead. He thinks the letter not...
I observe a great number of contracts for carrying the mails are advertised to be made within a short time hence, & for 4. years. I suppose the principal reason for making such long contracts is the trouble which would be so often recurring to the post office, if they were shorter. This should have it’s just weight: but it may be doubted whether contracts for so long a time as 4. years do not...
The application of William Greetham for a Mediterranean pass for a vessel owned here, tho built abroad, being unauthorised by practice, tho’ perhaps not by law, and concerning the departments of both the State & Treasury, I ask the favor of mr. Madison and mr. Gallatin to give me their opinions thereon: at the same time I communicate to them what passed on the subject of passports under...
Th: Jefferson returns to mr. Madison Erving’s letter to Genl. Dearborne, & approves of a commission to him as Consul at London. Where to find a competent successor for Lisbon he knows not, unless Gilman, who refused St. Domingo, will accept this. Perhaps Genl. Dearborne can judge. The place must be reserved for a man of real diplomatic abilities. Marchant’s case will be the subject of further...
Whether prizes & the proceeds of them taken after the date of the treaty with France can be restored by the Executive, or need an act of the legislature? The constitution has authorised the ordinary legislature alone to declare war against any foreign nation. If they may enact a perfect, they may a qualified war, as was done against France. In this state of things they may modify the acts of...
With respect to the prosecutions against Thomas & others for a misdemeanor at Common law we ought to presume the judges will do right, and to give them an opportunity of doing so. The Executive ought not to sit in previous judgment on every case & to say whether it shall or shall not go before the judges. I think therefore this case ought to go on to trial, without interference of the...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate salutations to mr. Madison & sends him the inclosed which will explain itself. He hopes to see him & family at Monticello when most convenient to themselves; and observes for his information that the road through Shadwell is put into fine order, the right hand at issuing from the ford on this side to be greatly preferred to the left. The road by Milton...
Doctr. Rose delivered me last night the letter with which you charged him, and I have thought it better to attend to it’s contents at once before the arrival of the load of other business which this morning’s post will bring. Pinckney’s, Orr’s, Livermore’s, Howell’s, Webster’s, Murray’s, Otis’s, Graham’s & Thornton’s letters, with Wagner’s sketch of an answer to the latter are all returned...
I wrote yesterday to you, before the arrival of the post. That brought some blank commissions which I have signed & now forward. Mr. Wagner’s note will explain them. The abuses & waste of public money in the military & naval departments have been so gross, that I do not think we can avoid laying some of them before Congress. I inclose you information of one which is not to be neglected. I have...
Your’s of the 18th. is recieved, and I now return all the papers which accompanied it, (except those in Bingham’s case) and also the papers inclosed in that of the 16th. The case of the British Snow Windsor taken by the prisoners she was carrying & brought into Boston is new in some circumstances. Yet I think she must fairly be considered as a prize made on Great Britain, to which no shelter...
Your’s of the 26th. by Doctr. Bache came duly to hand: and I now return you all the papers you inclosed except the commission for the Marshal of New Jersey, which I retain till I see you, which Dr. Bache gives me hopes will be the ensuing week, & I suppose will of course be the day after tomorrow, as you will then be free from the pressure of the post. I inclose with those papers, for perusal,...
I have no letter from you by the mail, whence I conclude I may possibly recieve something by private conveyance. A letter from miss Paine to Virginia Randolph saying nothing of your health makes me hope it is reestablished. I inclose you a letter from Genl. Saml. Smith with Barney’s letter to him. It contains matters worthy of some attention. I do not believe that Murray would endeavor to...
Your’s of yesterday was delivered by your express about 5. aclock in the evening. My occupations for the departing post have prevented my answering instantly. No commission, nor letter of credence was signed for mr. Livingston before we left Washington. I think the Boston has not yet left Boston for New York. I presume therefore that we can sign those papers in time after our return to...
Your favor of the 16th by post & 17th by mr. Davis have been duly rec⟨eived.⟩ He has not yet opened himself to me; but I shall assure him that nothing can ⟨be⟩ said here on the subject, nor determined on but when we shall be together at Washington. I have a letter from mr. Gallatin whose only doubt is whether Rogers should be removed. If he is, he seems clear Davis had better have the...
Will you consider whether a copy of the inclosed sent to each head of department would be best, or to avail myself of your kind offer to speak to them. My only fear as to the latter is that ⟨t⟩hey might infer a want of confidence on my part. But you can ⟨de⟩cide on sounder views of the subject than my position may admit. ⟨If⟩ you prefer the letter, modify any expressions which you ⟨m⟩ay think...
Coming all of us into Executive office new, and unfamiliar with the course of business previously practised, it was not to be expected we should in the first outset adopt, in every part a line of proceeding so perfect as to admit no amendment. The mode & degrees of communication particularly between the President & heads of departments have not been practised exactly on the same scale in all...
Will you give the inclosed a serious revisal, not only as to matter, but diction? Where strictness of grammar does not weaken expression, it should be attended to in complaisance to the purists of New England. But where by small grammatical negligences, the energy of an idea is condensed, or a word stands for a sentence, I hold grammatical rigor in contempt. I will thank you to expedite it,...
The Virginia resolution inclosed was, I am sure, in full confidence that you would contribute your counsel as well as myself. I have only relieved you from the labour of the premier ebauche. I must you to consider the subject thoroughly, and either make the inclosed what it should be, or a new draught. It should go on without delay, because I shall desire Monroe, if there is any thing in it he...
Having no confidence that the office of the private secretary of the President of the US. will ever be a regular & safe deposit for public paper⟨s⟩ or that due attention will ever be paid on their transmission from one Secretary or President to another, I have, since I have been in office, sent every paper, which I deem meerly public, & coming to my hands, to be deposited in one of the offices...