You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Randolph, Thomas Mann
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Randolph, Thomas Mann" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 31-40 of 81 sorted by date (ascending)
I wrote you two letters yesterday by the direct post. in the evening I recieved the two now inclosed, and altho’ I do not know that sending them by Richmond they can get to you sooner than if sent by our next post of Wednesday, yet I take that chance, to lessen the anxiety of yesterday’s accounts. affectionate salutations RC ( DLC ); endorsed by Randolph as received 10 June. Recorded in SJL...
Your’s of May 30. has been recieved. should Brown recover so that the law shall inflict no punishment on Cary, it will be necessary for me to make an example of him in terrorem to others, in order to maintain the police so rigorously necessary among the nailboys. there are generally negro purchasers from Georgia passing about the state, to one of whom I would rather he should be sold than to...
In a letter of May 2. to mr Peyton I had said to him that if Henderson, counting on the indulgence I have used in leaving his dam hitherto, should propose to sell his 4. acres as a mill seat, I would immediately direct mr Lilly to take down the dam, and I desired mr Peyton to employ counsel & obtain an order for a mill on my part of the lands, but still to act in his own name & keep me out of...
As possibly an authentic copy of the decree against Henderson may be wanted at the hearing of his & Peyton’s applications for an order of court for a mill, I have procured one from Richmond & inclose it to you. you will observe the level to which it restores & confirms my right is that at which the water stood at the confines between Henderson & myself , before the erection of his dam. that is...
On the evening of the 3d inst. we recieved a letter from mr King (arrived at N. York) covering one from Livingston & Monroe to him in which they informed him that on the 30th. of April they signed a treaty with France, ceding to us the island of N. Orleans and all Louisiana as it had been held by Spain. the price is not mentioned. we are in hourly expectation of the treaty by a special...
The arrival of the treaty of cession of Louisiana last night, and the short day given for ratification (Oct. 30.) will oblige me to call Congress about the middle of that month; & consequently to return here earlier than I had calculated; I shall therefore go home earlier. I think I shall be with you on Friday or Saturday next. my affectionate love to all of you.—the price of Louisiana...
I have been so closely engaged since I came here that I have not had time to write any letter which could be postponed. this place is unusually healthy. some persons from Alexandria have been taken with the fever here & died, without communicating it: so that we consider our rural situation as perfectly exempt from the danger. it seems to get worse in Alexandria, Philadelphia & New York, & so...
The post of last night brings us agreeable information from New Orleans & Natchez. Genl. Wilkinson arrived at N. Orleans from Mobille Nov. 25. settled immediately with Laussat all the circumstances of the delivery, & proceeded next day to Fort Adams, where he would arrive on the 30th. & expect to meet Claiborne there ready for embarcation. on the 29th. Laussat demanded possession of the...
I believe I mentioned to you at Monticello that seeing that the case between Peyton & Henderson would branch out into endless different lawsuits if left to take it’s course from every occurrence which might arise I had determined to bring the whole case, with every circumstance belonging to it & every party interested, into one bill and a single suit in Chancery; and I drew a bill accordingly...
I have but a single moment to announce to you the death of Trist at N. Orleans. one letter brought us news of his extreme illness, and another, by the same post, of his death. the situation of his family is to be deplored indeed; and I am afraid they will expect what the public mind will not admit. God bless you all. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.