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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Page, John
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Page, John" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Your’s of Feb. 1 did not reach me until Feb. 28. and a press of business has retarded my acknoleging it. I sincerely thank you for your congratulations on my election, but this is only the first verse of the chapter. what the last may be nobody can tell. a consciousness that I feel no wish but to do what is best, without passion or predilection, encourages me to hope for an indulgent...
I pray you, in the first place, that the contents of this letter may be inviolably secret, until promulgated by some public act. in my letter of March 2d . I mentioned to you that the Mint had been left at Philadelphia merely because taken up by the legislature too late to decide on it. the subject is now resumed, and there is no doubt the institution will be suppressed. this of course...
Yours of Mar. 27. was recieved last night; and the object of the present is to assure you that you may take your own time for making enquiries and deliberating for a final decision on the proposition made you in my former letter : only let your enquiries be so conducted as not to permit the object to be suspected in the least. I am afraid it might not be prudent to take into calculation the...
The operation which Congress has [performed] in the [...] the custom house officers [...] was expected. from that at Petersburg particularly they have taken only the salary of 250. D. which they have given to Richmond. consequently the emoluments will be as represented in the paper sent you, only deducting the 250. D. this I think will make it about 750. D. a year more than mr Gallatin then...
I take the liberty of introducing to your notice the bearer hereof, mr Olsen, minister of his Danish majesty residing here. his public and diplomatic character would of course mark him to you as an object of deserved respect and attention wheresoever he may present himself; but his personal character authorises me to assure you you will find him a person entitled to more than formal...
Your favor of the 2d. found me here, where I am for a few days only. being an answer to mine it would not have needed an acknolegement but that I owe you a letter on an event which gave your country great satisfaction & to none more than to myself: I mean your appointment to the chair of the state. Mr. Olsen the Danish minister, having intended a visit to Richmond soon after your election, I...
In a former letter from Washington I expressed a wish that the salubrity of our climate here, and the wishes of antient friends might make it agreeable to mrs Page and yourself to come and pass some time during my stay here which will be to about the 20th. of September. from your answer I concieved hopes it would be so. I nourish them still with fondness, and anticipate the pleasure of...
Yours of the 2d. inst. has been duly recieved. I have altogether declined my journey to Bedford, and therefore am in no danger of being absent when yourself & family shall render us the kindness of a visit. as all roads appear bad to the traveller, and he is liable to be ill-advised in the choice of them, I take the liberty, on my own knolege of the routes from Richmond here, as well as on the...
Supposing that your curiosity would make an Account of Louisiana acceptable, I inclose to you one of those which contains a digest of the most interesting information we have been able to collect in so short a time. the information we recieve weekly from N. Orleans confirms our belief that quiet possession will be delivered to us; that there has never there been a thought of opposition, & that...
Your favor of Nov. 16. recieved Nov. 26. is now before me and I inclose you a letter of mr Gore , which I presume we may consider as the final result of our endeavor to procure an asylum in the colony of Sierra Leone for such persons of the description composing that colony as we might find it expedient to send there. Since the date of the resolution which has been the subject of this...
The case described in the inclosed letter is one to which I am an entire stranger. the writer seems really entitled to all the sympathies of our nature. the power of pardon resting with yourself, she should have addressed herself to you directly. I do not know whether she has done this or has counted on your known friendship to me, and that her distresses passing thro’ that channel would reach...
I have this moment recieved your letter of the 12th. instant giving information of the combination formed for counterfieting & circulating forged notes of the Branch banks of the United States, and will immediately take such measures, within the limits of the authority of the General government, as may most effectually cooperate with your endeavors to arrest and punish this practice so...
It being incumbent on the marshall for the state to keep his prisoners in effectual safe custody, and, where extra expence is necessary, to take the directions of the Secretary of the Treasury, I immediately communicated your letter of the 1st. inst. to mr Gallatin. he has instructed the marshall to reimburse the state the expence of the guard already incurred, and to provide for the future....
It appearing that Philip Williams & Jacob Ray charged with having committed a felony within the district of Columbia, have fled from justice, and have been found and arrested in the state of Virginia, it has become my duty on behalf of the said district to demand that the said Philip & Jacob be delivered up in order that they may be removed to the said district to be proceeded against...
Your letter, my dear friend, of the 25th. ult. is a new proof of the goodness of your heart, and the part you take in my loss marks an affectionate concern for the greatness of it. it is great indeed. others may lose of their abundance; but, I, of my want, have lost, even the half of all I had. my evening prospects now hang on the slender thread of a single life. perhaps I may be destined to...
I inclose for your perusal a letter from Dr. Rush, asking the favor of you to return it. on the question Whether the Yellow fever is infectious, or endemic, the Medical faculty is divided into parties, and it certainly is not the office of the public functionaries to denounce either party as the Doctr. proposes. yet, so far as they are called on to act, they must form for themselves an opinion...
Your several favors of the 3d. inst. have been duly recieved. on the affidavit of Greenlaw which you were so kind as to inclose, the necessary measures will be taken. that which covered claims of reimbursement from the treasury of the US. on the prosecution of Logwood, has been considered by the Secretary of the treasury, within whose department it is. he states as follows, that the account...
Resuming the subject of the resolutions of the House of Delegates of Dec. 31. 1800. Jan. 16. 1802. and Feb. 3. 1804. I have it not in my power to say that any change of circumstances has taken place which enables me yet to propose any specific asylum for the persons who are the subjects of our correspondence. the island of St. Domingo, our nearest and most convenient recourse, is too unsettled...
Mr. John D. Burke, who is engaged in writing the history of Virginia is sollicitous to have the means of consulting some volumes of laws & newspapers among my collection at Monticello, and has asked that I would deposit them with you where he might have the convenience of consulting them. presuming he had your approbation, I have desired mr T.M. Randolph to have them securely packed, addressed...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate & respectful salutations to his friend Governor Page, he has recieved his letter of the 6th. and will be happy to recieve himself & family at Monticello at their own greatest convenience. NNUnionC .
Your letter of Nov. 22. should have been sooner answered, had I had an earlier moment at which I could have done it. but it’s object has not been delayed. I put it immediately into the hands of Genl. Dearborne who promised to save you all further ceremony or trouble, by ordering the fugitive, if at fort Mc.Henry, to be sent down in irons & delivered to the civil authority at Norfolk. I hope...
By a letter from mr Walker to mr Madison I learn that he had visited you lately at Rosewell, and thought that some occupation in the public concerns would not be refused by you. I wish there was any thing to offer, which might give you amusement, profit & little labor. but our’s you know is not a government of any great choice of office. we have reason to consider as very near at hand a...
This letter is entirely confidential. I am warned by sollicitations for the post-office at Richmond, that it is likely to become vacant by the death of the present incumbent. the office you now hold will be abolished when our public debt shall be discharged. in consideration of this circumstance, of the comparative emoluments & labor & confinement of the two offices, will you make up your mind...
Your’s of June 22. was recieved in due time. since that the Postmaster General has returned to this place, and I desired him to inform me what were the emoluments of the P.M.’s place at Richmond. he says those of the last year, ending Apr. 1. were 2098 D. 54C out of which the Postmaster pays Clerk’s hire, office rent Etc. this is not so much as I had expected, and possibly is not as good as...
Your’s of the 11th. is recieved. in appointments to public office of mere profit I have ever considered faithful service in either our first or second revolution as giving preference of claim, and that appointments on that principle would gratify the public and strengthen that confidence so necessary to enable the Executive to direct the whole public force to the best advantage of the nation....
Th: Jefferson asks again the intermediation of mr Page to convey to mr Robertson a corrected commission and he salutes him & mrs Page with great attachment and respect. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
‘In the midst of life we are in death.’ so has said some great moralist, and so says truth even for the young: and how much rather for us who have closed our thirteenth lustre! I have moreover heard that you have been particularly afflicted by want of health latterly, insomuch as to make it probable the indispensable attentions to your office are burthensome to you. would it be a relief to...