You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Coxe, Tench
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Coxe, Tench" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 119 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I beg you to excuse the liberty & the inconvenience of this application, & to believe that Nothing would induce to the step but the imperious dictates of duty to a family whose interests for more than twenty years I have greatly neglected. Thus circumstanced I reflect with seriousness & not without sensitivity that the time approaches when your retirement from public life will prevent my...
It is from a sense of duty that I furnish you, in confidence, with some information, which this day casually fell into my way. It cannot be considered as a matter of deep importance, but it is sufficiently so to warrant me in troubling you with a statement. I had in my hands two manuscript books, handsomely bound in red leather, said to be copies N. 3 & 4, of a statistical account of the...
The situation of the United States has become very uncomfortable, and presents disagreeable prospects as to revenue, internal order & harmony, foreign trade, supplies and the maintenance of peace. It is a time for every honest latitude in the freedom of discussion. When public authority is present and entirely respected , the faithful and well disposed citizen may disclose his hopes &...
I had the honor to furnish you lately with some Abstracts (in my hand writing) from a paper mentioned in my unsigned letter; and since I sent you a cover with the name (in my hand writing) of the person who wrote the paper. It was my intention to follow the two with such a letter as this; that you might know on my responsibility the existence of such a paper, and the name of the writer. I have...
I take the liberty to inclose you a letter for the President which I request the favor of you to deliver or forward with such addition, if any, as you may judge proper. I have written to Mr. Gallatin at NewYork, by the mail of this day. It was at a period very remote from this, that I had first the pleasure to become acquainted with you, and I trust you have found me ever since in the ranks of...
The account of the death of the late worthy collector of this port will probably reach you with this letter. I hope you will excuse me for submitting my name as a candidate for the office. Having before had the honor to make such an address, I will not trespass upon your valuable time by presenting to your consideration the grounds of my respectful application. I will confine myself to the...
The great importance of the present crisis occasions me earnestly to wish for a copy of the report on our external relations, which is understood to have been recently communicated, as soon any spare ones may be recd. from the press, and be permitted to circulate among our citizens. I beg the favor of your desiring one of the gentlemen of the Department to cover one to me. Tho it is perfectly...
British blockade by mere notification-- Russian--do. Not to produce a fall of the blockade plan but to annoy the adversary belligerent & to defend the distant subjects of the blockade, including neutral ports. Both before Nov. 6. 1806. Berlin & Milan Rety. Decree DLC .
The present condition of the world certainly demands all the consideration of every wise and good man, which his situation permits or requires him to bestow upon a temporal subject. The war, which in various forms and upon several grounds, has been carried on between France and her adversaries, has reached a degree of seriousness, which ensures consequences of the most extensive effects and...
Dear Sir Very pressing business of the Army & indian department, with some other circumstances & the impossibility of accomplishing, in a short time, conversations with others sufficiently casual in appearance have prevented my thinking as closely and seriously upon the subject of the treaty, as I earnestly desired, when your wishes and the public interests called me to the duty. I have...
To James Madison, Esquire, Secretary of State the memorial & petition of Tench Coxe, a citizen of Philadelphia in the State of Pennsylvania. Your Memorialist respectfully represents that he has been frequently and seriously impressed with the manifest inconveniencies & disadvantages constantly arising to the people of the United States from the practice & necessity of bottling, corking, wiring...
This letter goes to you as a citizen. I have no copy of it, or the paper it encloses. If that paper seems to you (as a citizen, who loves his country and has a goodwill for the writer) likely to do good, it may take any course, altered or unaltered, as may seem best. My information is imperfect, my views of course limited, & liable to be incorrect, and I may feel too much. Our Country does not...
As I conceive it may be useful, and I feel it to be proper that the Government should know of the enclosed republication, I have the honor to cover two of the first half sheets, and to be with perfect respect yr. mo. obedt. h. Servant I expect the completion of the whole with some additions in ten or twelve days. DLC : Papers of James Madison.
In the course of my reflexions on the subject on which I had the honor in my last letter respectfully to address you, it has occurred to me, that it is in my power to submit to you an unsought and decided evidence of public opinion in a republican circle. I beg leave to assure you, that the original letter to me, from which the inclosed is faithfully extracted is in my possession. It will...
I understand to day that the coming out of Lord Selkirk is certain, and that he is to come in the place of Mr. Erskine. It is also stated to me that the British Government has adopted a rule that no minister shall go from England to any foreign Government, who is unmarried, "particularly to our government" This seems to be considered as merely calculated to keep them disengaged from connexions...
Being this day informed that the death of the late worthy Collector of this Port has taken place, I do myself the honor most respectfully to submit myself to your consideration as a candidate for that situation. As the Office has a direct relation to that pursuit in life to which I was regularly bred, and in which I have been habituated by practice, I respectfully trust that this step will not...
I take the liberty of mentioning to you that I am informed Genl. Muhlenberg has given to one of the assistants in his office a declaration on writing, that he is willing to retire from the Collectorship. Under this circumstance, I hope it will not be deemed indelicate in me to ask the honor of your consideration as a candidate for such vacancy. As the office has a direct relation to the...
I have this day the honor of your respected favor of the 21st. instant. Permit me to assure you, Sir, that it is a cordial to my bosom, that the observations on naval power, No. 2, promise, in your judgment, public benefit. Our country wants all the zeal of its good citizens to nurse and defend its minor state in a season when the adult nations are so irregular, and excessive; and this is my...
I have the honor to submit to your consideration some reflexions, which have been some time on my mind, the publication of which appears inconvenient. It is not for me to say, whether the principle they exemplify is worthy of adoption, nor what season for such adoption may be fit and proper. The bearing of such regulations on our foreign relations, our finances &c will naturally be considered...
Mr. Coxe has the honor respectfully to submit to the inofficial perusal of Mr. Jefferson, a part of a series of papers, which he has sent to a Washington News paper, which have a material relation to public affairs. They contain a proportion of matter published in a former crisis, with considerable additions arising out of present circumstances. It is a serious & painful truth, that gazettes &...
Cotton The present crisis again draws into consideration the important agricultural production which is the subject of the inclosed pages. It is the interest of the United States to consider at this juncture, the domestic means of supply. If war is to ensue, or the principle of our non importation law is to be maintained or extended, manufactures are rendered proportionally necessary to our...
An original letter from a house of the first character in Liverpool, of the 7th. Ulto. is now in my hands. It mentions that "the import of cotton from the East Indies, has amounted, in 5 Mos., & 7 days of 1807, to 49.213. bales, and that a further importation from the same quarter into G Britain will take place from September to Decemr., of 50.000 bales more, that the present use of India...
A case of so much importance to the U. S. has occurred here, that I do myself the honor to inclose to you a copy of the opinions of Ch. J. Tilghman and Judge Smith (of the Supe. Co. of Pa.) which was lent to me by Mr. Du Ponceau. He was of course for France, and Mr. C. Hare for the officer. In the course of the discussion, it appeared, that Mr. Bond was offered to prove that British Deserters...
I have been requested to transmit to you the papers in relation to Mr. William Griffith Montgomery, which I have now the honor to inclose. His father is one of that numerous body of natives of Ireland, whom the American war of 1775 found here. He took an active part in the revolutionary contest to its close. His mother was a native of this city, a sister of Dr. S. P. Griffith’s and a niece of...
The proclamation is well received here by a very large proportion of the community. It is however suggested from a quarter by no means unfriendly, that it would have been agreeable and useful, if the impressment of our Seamen, who were taken from the frigate had been as distinctly and positively affirmed as their American birth. The circumstances of their escape from the British service & the...
I have sent to our greater seaports from New Orleans to Portsmouth N. H. to different friends, copies of the dispatch on impressment. You will see from the enclosed paper how seasonable the important contents of that paper are. It is true that many circumstances will induce men of all parties to support our opposition to G. B. whether of war, or less seriousness. But every day convinces me...
A british armed brig of 10 guns, & I believe about 250 Tons has been this afternoon crippled & dismantled in this port. She was loading with provisions, flour, fish &c and German Linens and goods as is said. The measure was the result of the present public feeling. Her name is the Fox, Capt. Wainwright. The popular opinion was that she was going to the British ships with provisions, but I...
The meeting held here this day has gone off tranquilly. A set of resolutions were adopted the contents of which I am unable to state, as I could not hear them. I presume they go upon the general ground of agreeing to support the government in measures against the late british excesses. The meeting was mixt, numerous & respectable. Some circumstances have occurd on this occasion which merit...
(Private) There are many symptoms of foreign and domestic eagerness upon the subject of the business of the trials to be held next month in N. York. A few days ago a well known shorthand writer mentioned to me casually in the street that he had received, without a name, a note containing bank bills for $100, that he could not tell from whence it came, and that the note stated that the money...
In the present serious posture of affairs, it has appeared to me that the state of the public mind upon the subject of impressments requires attention. The republicans are not aware of the strong ground which the government have taken in those discussions, the importance of which is greatly enhanced by their having been exhausted before the affair of the Chesapeake and Leopard. The federalists...