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When I had the honor to write you upon the subject of an appointment, I did it with great reluctance from the numerous suggestions of names & applications that must necessarily embarrass and distress you. I will not suppress the expression of a consciousness, that I have undergone the most injurious and severe trials in the public service as a citizen lately, and before as an officer. My...
Among the papers, which I possess in relation to the late transactions of the United states, there are several relative to the British treaty, which it may be useful to pass into your hands. The concessions, sacrifices, and losses of this country may become in some way topics either of argument or negociation, and the papers I refer to, may contribute to the defence of our conduct, or to the...
A gentleman of this place called upon me to day and stated to me the receipt of a letter by him evidencing some kind intentions towards me. There appears to be a necessity of making some remarks and explanations, which I hope will be excused. The reason of mentioning the object in a letter (covered to the Secy of State) from this place, was the certainty represented to me of a vacancy—the...
One of my neighbours when I lived in this place, Mr. Du Ponceau is about to publish a collection of state papers calculated to illustrate some important points of public law. One of them which he shewed me appeared to be so important that I begd a copy, which I might send to Washington. I have the pleasure to inclose it. You will observe it expressly mentions wheat, meat &ca. not to be...
I have this evening a letter from Mr. Beckley in which he communicates to me the information, that the office of Supervisor of the Revenue of Pennsa. will probably be assigned to General Muhlenberg. There are I believe two offices in this state which will neat more than that—each I mean will. But from long observation and experience you may rely on my information, that to execute both of them...
Knowing the attachment to freedom and humanity, which mark your character I feel a solicitude to bring into your view the Situation of the people of Ireland in the United States. You will not understand that I recommend any measures in regard to them or their unhappy country. But, if any in Authority here have forgotten our engagements of 1775, if they have denied them the proferred rights of...
Public Business having called me to Philada. on the 10th. of March, I did not receive your favor of the 11th. Feby till the 31st. ultimo. The book accompanied it. It was my intention that the papers N. 1. to 8 should have remained in your library, as I have another copy of the Book, and the question of the commencement of violations of neutral trade is very important. The rise and progress of...
The gentleman to whom you wrote on the 26th. of March arrived here a few days ago from Philadelphia, and, during a stay of six days, mentioned to me a passage you did me the honor to write in relation to myself. You will permit me to repeat that I never knew of his writing either of his letters about me ‘till they were sent, that I never asked such an act of friendship of him, and that I...
H. Miller. Muhlbg No. 1. H. M. Supervisor of the Reve. Latimer No. 2. The collector of the Customs, Phila. Mc.pherson N. 3. The naval officer, Philada. Jackson N. 4. The Surveyor of the port of Phila. T.Ross } Coxe Ashe N. 5 The
It is only by candid representations of the disinterested, or the applications of the concerned, that you can add to that stock of information, which your own and your ministers knowledge afford. I trust therefore that in doing myself the honor to communicate these remarks, I shall contribute to your accommodation. The question of alterations in the list of officers, civil, and all others, may...
24 April 1801, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Recommends E. Forman and Samuel White for clerkships. If neither JM nor Gallatin can find employment for them, hopes JM will mention them “for any vacancy in the war or navy departments.” RC ( DLC ). 2 pp.; docketed by JM.
Mr. Jacob Meyer, who was lately our consul in French St. Domingo is going to Washington upon some business, and has requested me to give him a letter to you in whose department the affair lies. I remember Mr. Meyer, when living with Mr. Pettit of Philada. from whom he expects to take a letter to Mr. Gallatin, and I suppose Mr. Pettit, and his sons house of Pettit & Bayard must know more of Mr....
I write you this letter under as much caution as the Circumstances of the case will admit. It relates to the same business as is mentioned in my private letter of the latter end of the Month preceding that month in which this will reach you. The cover of this will shew you by the post mark both its dates of time & place. The person whom I mentioned in the late letter to which I refer has been...
I am so entirely convinced of the continuance of political, local & personal hostility to the present federal administration, or at least to the two most eminent characters in it, that I consider it a duty to my country’s peace to offer some ideas which occasionally arise in my mind, in a confidential manner to those two characters. It is a noble game to oppose to the infidelity, and local &...
Your letter of the 5th. instant came to my hands yesterday afternoon, and the mail will depart in two hours. On the rect. of it, I went to the house of Mr ——s brother in law, where he lodges when here, but find he has not returned, and is supposed by his friends in this place to be yet in Washington. I suppose he may have gone from thence to Norfolk, Baltimore or Philada. where he has...
I have seen the Gentleman, whom you mentioned in your favor of the 6th. to have left Washington before you saw him a second time. I find that he had expected to have been sent for in the Course of the five or six days he spent there, tho he is impressed with the proper ideas as to your hea[l]th, the press of Business, and the difficulty of intercourse in the present scattered state of the...
You will be pleased to consider me as not to disposed to accept the appointments you mention in your letter of the 17th. instant. I hope no person knows that they have been offered to me, particularly by yourself, and I earnestly request that the fact may never be communicated. I could wish, if it is known, that you meditated the offer, that it may be believed that on reflexion you did not...
I wrote by the mail of last evening in reply to your letter of the 17th. that the two places might not be left unattended to. The offer made to me, certain parts of your letter & a publication in the Washington Intelligencer , I think of the 12th., have caused serious reflexions in my mind. I am perfectly acquainted with the sentiments of Pennsa. on one side & I think well informed on the...
In the Course of public business it has been my lot and duty to meet a gentleman, who held a quadrennial situation on the first Wednesday in Decembr.—He had been recently in the army and is, as you will perceive, in the Senate. The inclosed voluntary letter (from the original on public file,) will prove how little calculation is to be made upon that determined hostility to me, which rival and...
Note on the act of the President of the United States of the — of — 1801. relative to the internal Revenues . By the constitution of the United States (Sect. 8 art. 1) it is ordained, that all duties imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the U.S. All the internal revenues have been collected in the N.W. Territory, as well as in Virginia, Pennsa. or Massachusetts. It was discovered,...
This letter is transmitted, respectfully, as the only information I possess of the Gentleman, tho I should rely on the recommendation of Mr. le Ray (de Chaumont) Junr. had he given one. RC ( DNA : RG 59 , LAR ); undated; on same sheet as James Anderson to Coxe, Paris, 9 June 1801, requesting a consular post in France, Spain, or Italy, and naming Jacques Donatien Le Ray de Chaumont as a...
From a desire to cultivate the public interests and honor of the United States I prepared, soon after Mr Randolph’s resignation, the enclosed paper. It was candidly placed in the hands of Mr R’s successor. It will be perceived that it was studiously qualified so as to meet the prepossessions, some signal expressions of which Mr P. had suffered to escape him. It might be made a much stronger...
As I had the honor to receive from you some remarks on the office I now hold from Genl. M , I trust it will not be improper to give you some information on the subject, and I take this liberty the more freely, because I cannot deprive myself of the satisfaction of believing, that my situation, as an Individual and as connected with the sufferings & exertions in the cause of American & human...
Because of Tench Coxe’s efforts on behalf of the Republican party in the Pennsylvania gubernatorial contest of 1799 and in the general federal elections of 1800, Jefferson, in June 1801, had held out to him the prospect of two posts in Philadelphia, one as survey inspector, another as collector of internal revenue. Both positions would have enabled Coxe to remain in Philadelphia, as he...
A small addition is proposed to the note by the mail of monday & wednesday from Pha. to Washn. The subject is of deep importance. It does not proceed from the vanity of suppose [ sic ] that any thing can strike here, which will not occur there. Any dangerous views towards this country are most practicable where there is a particular description of people. We are obviously most vulnerable...
British private Vessels. The important and curious document, in this inclosure, appears to be well adapted to the use of the government of the U.S. It exhibits the whole of the private British Shipping owned in Great Britain, proper, & Ireland, exclusively of the Colonies, in August 1801. also their actual employment or situation. There are 124 pages at about 80 on a page giving 9920 Vessels....
The two enclosed papers N. 1 & 2; written in New York, prove that the recent peace and the concomitant state of things are made from the Moment, subservient to antirepublican purposes by the leading influence among the federalists. They glance, significantly, at Louisiana & Florida. The ideas suggested in regard to the change of the owners of those countries have received from one source a...
The recent events in the Island of St. Domingo, if confirmed, will evince the importance to consumption and revenue of the plan of promoting the sugar, coffee, and cocoa cultivation in China, and other yet independent asiatic states particularly the first. My best documents show that St. Domingo in 1790—yielded of white & brown sugar above 140. millions of pound [wt.] of coffee  77 do. of...
I find among my collection of documents in relation to our foreign trade a book full of tables, statements, and representations, which tho written under a very different state of things from that now existing, must be of considerable use in estimating our prospects. I have the pleasure to send it by the mail, of Monday the 4th. Jany. & I retain this letter one day that it may serve as an...
I am informed that Congress are to rise in the beginning of April, and that the internal Revenues will be repealed before this can depart. The few republicans among my family connections, and others among our political friends concur in the hope that something permanent will be done for me before the Senate shall rise. Mr. Gallatin I am sure will testify that I have never shewn any coldness,...
When your message to the legislature announced the idea of the abolition of the internal revenues, I presumed that it was after such examination of the subject as would give rise to the same idea among the members of Congress. I expected therefore the abolition of the little office on which all my income depends. I find from communications from several of the members, and the debates of the...
It is manifest to every person, who reflects on the affairs of the United States, that the present season rather offers a new, than a defective mass of commercial advantages. The acquisition of a large monied capital, and of a universal credit, public & private, have relieved us from the British monopoly, or at least afforded the sure means and this is a revolution in trade . To give activity...
(Private) As I am informed from various quarters that there is no doubt of the repeal of the national revenue laws, my situation obliges me to trouble some of the gentlemen in the government with an application. On reflexion I think it least embarrassing to Mr. Gallatin, in a Pennsylvania case, not to address myself to him, tho he is the only Person, besides the President, to whom I wish, if...
The idea I lately took the liberty to suggest may have appeared visionary and strange, but on much reflexion I am convinced that it is the interest of the United States that such a measure should be adopted either by the Government, or by the mercantile interest varying the form of course so as to render it proper for them. I beg leave to submit the reasons. We are now dependent upon one...
In the course of some recent attempts to improve the public mind with our capacities and progress upon the subject of cotton , several ideas, which did not appear fit for present publication, occurd. It appeared of importance that they should be placed before the government however, to be treated according to their discretion. I concluded to make a little historical note upon the cotton...
The papers announce that the legislature is to rise in ten days. This critical and peculiar situation in which I am placed impels me, contrary to my intention, to address you once more before the conclusion of the Session. It was in the Month of Decemr. 1800, that a gentleman now in Washington then recently returned from that place, informed me here, that a number of the persons who were...
The extinction of the modern republics. The result of the Consulta at Lyons merits the attention of the American Government. When the Peace of Oct. 1801 was known here, it was observed that there were no provisions in favor of the republican form of government, no Securities for its existence. The first consul of France was its arbitrary Chief, de facto . The English obtained their end, “ of...
I am requested on the part of Robert Porter, Esqre, to mention his name to you for the vacant Commission of Bankruptcy. I have the honor therefore to represent that gentleman to be a practicing Attorney at Law of this city, of good property & character, and [with?] the habits of Business. He was a Lieutenant of Artillery at the close of the Revolutionary war, & a native of Pennsylvania, & the...
13 February 1803, Philadelphia. The house of Coxe and Frazier, in which he was formerly engaged, has a claim to a tract of land “which is a part of a larger tract on or near to the waters of Bayou Pierre & the East Bank of the River Mississippi.” This was conveyed to him in 1790 by Edward Jones, who is now in Gallatin’s office. The original tract was granted by Great Britain to General Lyman,...
In the letter I had the Honor to address to you on the subject of the packages of books and stationary sent to Pittsburg, I mentioned one for the Indiana Territory, which does not appear there, and which Mr. Hooke does not remember to have forwarded to that Government. He desires to know whether his rect., given to his Predecessor Mr. Brownson, for the packages in Store, when he was appointed,...
An eminent Merchant of this city has lately communicated to me some information upon the subject of the India trade. In doing this he furnished me with a note upon that part of the British treaty which relates to it. I have the honor to enclose the paper, and to refer the last paragraph of nine lines to your consideration. There is a question of some importance, whether the two years run from...
The great importance of the Florida and Louisiana Business has occasioned me to trouble you with some extracts from a considerable french Geographical work of 1741, which was reprinted in 10 or 12 Volumes 1767, after the French Cession of Louisiana. I believe the Spaniards in office here are very uneasy at the expressions in the report of the Comme. of the Reps. lately made public with respect...
17 January 1804, Philadelphia. “Mr. Thomas Benger of the County of Philadelphia goes to Washington for the purpose of obtaining a patent for the preparation of oak bark for dying. He wishes for the honor of being made known to you & through you to the Board for granting patents. Soon after the peace of 1783 this gentleman with a numerous connexion moved from Newfoundland to our county of...
3 February 1804, Purveyor’s Office. Has just acknowledged receipt of the U.S. treasurer [Thomas Tudor Tucker]’s order for a sum which agrees with that mentioned in JM’s 28 Jan. 1804 letter. “Mr. Stevens’s bill has not yet appeared.” “The Sal ammc., Lac &c were sold on the day advertised. I have sent twice for the vendue account, but have not received it. When I shall obtain it the necessary...
3 April 1804, Purveyor’s Office. “As I am not possessed of the account of Mr. Stevens, and am uncertain whether it is your wish to include the bill he drew upon me I shall be much obliged by an explanation of your wishes. My Sales & the net proceeds could be rendered, and paid over instantly. I shall write Mr. Stevens upon the subject and beg the favor of your instructions. “It is discovered...
21 April 1804, Purveyor’s Office. “I have taken pains to procure information whether I could obtain a number of sets of the laws upon more favorable terms than those of Mr. Carey. The retail price has been $2 ⅌ vol, or $12 ⅌ set. I think it was high. Books of equal cost to the printer are retailed at $2 for the thickest volumes and $1.50 for the thinest, or $10.50 for the set of 6 volumes. The...
I have conferd with Mr. Carey since I had the honor to receive your letter of the 30th. Ulto. He expects to deliver 150 sets of the laws immediately, and very soon after 100 more. The Amount of the $2000 will therefore be soon delivered. I presume that I shall hear from the Treasurer this day or to morrow so that I can be perfectly punctual as to 250 or 260 of the first copies. I have...
Mr. Carey being prepared to deliver yesterday a number of sets of the Laws of the U.S. they were recd. cased & shipt agreeably to the inclosed bill of Lading on board the Schooner Hyland, Jno. Hand Junr. Master in two cases directed to “ The Secretary of State Washington .” She is expected to sail in three days. This being the first mail after the Books were ready, I avail myself of it to give...
Letter not found. 7 May 1804. Mentioned by Coxe in his docket of JM to Coxe, 3 May 1804 , as a letter informing JM of 149 copies of the laws of the U.S. shipped on 5 May.
9 May 1804, Purveyor’s Office. “This vessel (the Hiland, Hand Master) remaining in port, I have the Honor to inform you that a further shipment has been made of 38 sets of the Laws, for which a bill of Lading is enclosed. The vessel was expected to sail about this time. “I shall send only 200 copies to Washington ’til I am informed whether the quantity for Louisiana is 100 or 200. No time will...