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I have the honor to enclose you a plan of the City of New-Orleans. It will shew you the situation and extent of the commons claimed by the City, and also of the vacant Land on the Canal of Carondulet, which I alluded to in my Letter of yesterday. I am Dr Sir, With great respect Your faithful friend DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have the honor to present to you, a copy of the Laws of the Territory of Orleans: You will attribute to our inexperience, whatever may be improper—and for that portion of our Laws which is wise, we acknowledge ourselves indebted to the several States of the Union, whose prudent and wise policy, we shall be proud to imitate. With sentiments of great Respect, I have the honor to subscribe...
I have the honor to enclose you an address from the Legislative Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans, and to subscribe myself with Sentiments of great respect & Esteem yo: mo: obt. servt DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
  I have the honor to introduce to your acquaintance, Major Fortier, an Inhabitant of this City, and a very useful and worthy member of our Society.   Major Fortier has acted as one of my Aid de Camps from the period of my first arrival in this City, to the present day—and I have found in him the character of an active officer, a good american, and an honest amiable young man. With sentiments...
1 June 1802, Washington, Mississippi Territory. Acknowledges receipt of JM’s letter of 9 Apr. enclosing his commission as governor of the Mississippi Territory. Letterbook copy ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive Journal). 1 p. Printed in Rowland, Claiborne Letter Books Dunbar Rowland, ed., Official Letter Books of W. C. C. Claiborne, 1801–1816 (6 vols.; Jackson, Miss., 1917). , 1:116.
At the request of Mr. Julian Poidrass and of Mr. Pierre Derminon, Judge of the Parish of Point Coupie, I have the honor to transmit you the enclosed Address , signed by a number of the respectable Inhabitants (Planters) of Point Coupie, and which I am persuaded conveys a sincere expression of their sentiments on the subject to which it relates. With sentiments of great respect I have the honor...
I beg you to receive—accompanied with my warm respects—a Treatise written on the Criminal Laws of this Territory. I have the honor to be Your sincere friend— Major Rd. Claiborne takes this opportunity of sending his old and continued affection to Mr. Jefferson. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have the honor to enclose you a Copy of the Answer of the Marquis of Casa Calvo to my Letter of the 11th. Instant, and to Subscribe myself— With great respect, Yo: faithful friend DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
A Mr. Lafon is now engaged in surveying the Land on the Canal of Carondolet;—He supposes that about eight or nine Hundred acres may be had, nearly half of which he says is excellent Land, and not subject to be overflowed. Mr. Briggs has been very unwell, and could not in person attend the surveying— I am Dear Sir with great Respect Your faithful friend DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have the honor to inclose you a letter from Governor Salcedo, in reply to my communication of the 9th. day of March last (of which a Copy was transmitted you on the 14th. of the same month) upon the subject of the fugitive Slaves, from which it seems that he does not feel himself at liberty to act without the instructions of the King his Master. I am Sir, with great respect, yo: mo: hble...
The Mail has this moment arrived, and brought me your Letter of the 28th. of October.— The Communication you made to Mr. Gelston fell into proper hands, and has been used as you intended.—As the Mail will leave this early in the morning, I shall defer replying particularly to your Letter until next week.— Accept Dear Sir assurances of my respectful attachment DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have been honored with the receipt of your letter of the 21. of March, inclosing a copy of an act of Congress which authorizes the President to accept of such Company or Companies of Volunteers, not exceeding 30,000, as shall make a tender of service. The present state of things on the western side of the Mississippi, as far as I am advised, authorizes a hope that no difficulty will shortly...
Your letter of the 12th. Ultimo (covering copies of the orders of the Secretary’s of War & of the Navy relative to the deserters which had been forcibly taken from the District of Baton Rouge) has been received; & in reply to a late letter from Governor Grand Pré, in which he expressed a Solicitude, to learn the orders of the President, relative to that transaction , I did on the 11th....
I have taken the liberty to address to your Care, one Hogshead, three Boxes & two Cases directed “to the President of the United States,” and which were this day put on Board the Ship Comet, (Captain McNeil) bound for Baltimore.—The Hogshead & Boxes contain Curiosities which were collected by Captain Lewis in his Voyage up the Missourie; In one Cage , is a living animal, cal’ld the Wild Dog of...
On this morning; (accompanied by the Mayor of the City Mr Petot) I visited the ground adjacent to the Canal of Carondulet, and find the Land low, and in some parts subject to be overflowed;—But my impression is, that the whole may easily be reclaimed, and will soon be valuable.— The Commons of the City as explained by the Mayor, and as he said, were defined in a Grant issued by a french...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 24 January 1806, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose you a Copy of a statement made me on Oath, by Stephen a free black man; I do not credit it in whole; I however, have no doubt, but that the free people of Color have been tampered with, and that some of them are devoted to the spanish Interest. “Mr. Morales is yet in this City, and should I not an [ sic...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 5 July 1805, New Orleans. “In a former Letter, I advised you of the departure of Captain Carmick for Pensacola with a communication from me to Governor Folch upon the Subject of the Post Road through West Florida. Captain Carmick was detained much longer than was expected, and has returned without Governor Folch’s Answer. A Copy of Captain Carmicks Letter to me...
 The Bearer Mr. Hopkins was charged with public Despatches (of great importance) to the Secretary of State, and I trust will have safely delivered them, when he presents you with this Letter.—  Mr. Hopkins is desirous of obtaining a Commission in the Army of the U. States; He is a young Man of amiable disposition, correct habits, and good Judgment—I can venture, therefore to recommend him to...
21 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have nothing interesting to communicate, nor would I write you by this mail, were it not to inform you, that the most perfect good order prevails in this city. I find, the most trifling occurrences here, attract attention to the Northward, and that a disposition exists among some people to give to certain events a consequence they do not merit: To prevent...
I have had the honor to receive your Letter of the 6th. of May, advising me of the additional restraints imposed by Congress on Coasting Vessels, with a view of preventing those evasions of the embargo Laws, which “the worthless part of Society,” have of late so successfully practiced.—Pending the interdiction of our Commercial Intercourse with foreign Nations, it is not probable that...
I shall set out for New-Orleans in two Days, & expect to arrive there on or before the 18th. Instant. Tyler who stands charged with the Crime of Treason, is said to be in the Opelousas District; I have given orders for his Arrest, & will have him conveyed to the Hon’ble the Judge for the District of Orleans, who will I presume order him to be sent to Richmond. John Smith of Ohio, is at Batton...
Governor Falch is now in this City, and was received by me with respectful attention. On this morning accompanied by my Militia Officers, I waited upon the Marquis of Casa Calvo; visited with him the Cathedral Church, and assisted at high Mass.—This day is the feast of St. Carlos, and with a view of testifying my respect for his Catholic Majesty so long as my Country shall be in Peace with him...
7 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have received an answer to the letter which I addressed to the Marquis De Casa Calvo on the 28th. ultimo; a translation of the answer and of the documents accompanying it are preparing, and when completed, the originals shall be transmitted to you. It seems La Coquette was fitted out at this place, and was permitted to depart after the receipt of assurances from...
I have been duly honored with the receipt of your letter of the 20th. Ultimo, and am happy to find that my correspondence with the Governor General of Techus, relative to fugitive Slaves, is approved. I am in daily expectation of receiving an answer from Governor Salcedo, and if my propositions are acceded to, I will endeavor to procure the passage of a Law as advised by the President....
I this moment met with the enclosed letter from Mr. Matthew Lyon to his constituents, and I sincerely hope it may be the only Copy that has reached this city. As a Western man, I feel myself under no obligations to Mr. Lyon for his boasted zeal for the Western interest, and although I am not disposed to question the purity of his motives, I am firmly persuaded, that during the last Session, he...
21 September 1804, New Orleans. “From the great havock which the diseases of this Climate, have recently made among Strangers, and the frequent embezzlement of the property of deceased Persons by unprincipled Men, I have been induced to make special provision for the care of the Estates of certain Intestates. A Copy of my Ordinance in this subject is enclosed, and I hope it will meet the...
5 February 1802, Natchez. Encloses copies of his 29 Jan. letter to General Wilkinson and Wilkinson’s reply. Hopes the request he made of the general was not improper but fears the peace of the territory is precarious, “surrounded as it is, by numerous Indian Tribes, and with a Population of Negroes, nearly equal to the number of Whites, … and it seemed to me advisable, to have the Spare Arms...
In a letter to the Secretary of State, I have given the particulars of the stoppage at Mobile of the American Schooner Ann, bound to Fort St. Stephens with provisions for our Troops.—I am firmly impressed with an opinion, that the Spanish Government is not disposed to extend towards the United States either a just or respectful conduct.—I further believe, that, to obtain for our fellow...
The case of the Batture has given rise to a warm Newspaper discussion, which for the present seems wholly to engage the public Mind. New-Orleans has so long been the residence of the Governor of the Territory, that the Inhabitants of that City, or rather some of them, think me culpable in taking a short excursion into the Country. But I am persuaded the President will not object to my retiring...
27 July 1804, New Orleans. “I received on this morning an answer to my letter of the 25th instant to the Marquis of Casa Calvo, and having procured a translation thereof, for my own use, I now enclose you the original Copy . “The answer of the Marquis developes in part the views of his court in relation to Louisiana; every exertion has been and will be made to conciliate and perpetuate the...
24 November 1801, Natchez. Reports his arrival on 23 Nov. after a journey made unduly difficult and dangerous by low rivers and high winds. Describes the land on the Mississippi as “pretty well adapted to Cultivation” but notes that “this extensive Country has been greatly forsaken, or rather, neglected by man,” there being only three small settlements on the Spanish side between the mouth of...
By the last mail I received your Letter of the 28th. of October, and was happy to learn your determination to appoint Mr. Brown the Successor of my friend Trist. I have particularly observed the Conduct of Mr. Brown in public and private Life, and I doubt not but he will continue to merit your Esteem and Confidence.—The family of my departed friend are in the enjoyment of health, and I am...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 8 November 1805, New Orleans. “I enclose you a copy of the answer which the House of Representatives have returned to my address, You will perceive that it is respectful and friendly. I am happy to find that nothing of party spirit has yet been manifested, and I indulge a hope that the Members generally will pursue a conduct which will be approved. “Believing...
It is my duty to advise you that slaves escaping from the Territory of the United States to the Province of Taxus, receive the protection of the Spanish Agents, and to suggest the very serious injury which is likely to result therefrom to the Inhabitants of the Territory of Orleans. The enclosure No. 1 is a Copy of a Presentment of a Grand Jury upon this subject, and that No 2 of a Letter...
26 March 1805, New Orleans . “I am Honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 25th Ultimo, and shall be particularly attentive to its contents. The Marquis of Casa Calvo is yet in this City, and I believe contemplates remaining for Some time; there at present exists between the Marquis and myself a friendly intercourse, and I shall embrace an early opportunity to make to him the...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 9 January 1806, New Orleans. “Mr. James Mather, late a Member of the Legislative Council, and now the Judge for the County of la Fourche, writes me under date of the 2d. of January, as follows: ‘The Marquis Casa Calvo remained in this settlement at least 15 days, during which time he principally employed himself in persuading the people—that all this side of the...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “The contents of your private letter gave me great pleasure; the permanent residence of Moralis in Louisiana, I should greatly regret.… “The Marquis De Casa Calvo is the enemy of Moralis, and a hint from me to the Marquis, that Moralis’s removal from Louisiana, would be agreeable, will (I believe) effect the object. “Moralis is a sensible, intrigueing, designing,...
30 September 1803 , “ Near Natchez .” Advised JM in his letter of 7 Sept. that citizens of the Mississippi Territory were surveying lands west of the Mississippi River “with a view … to obtain fraudulent Titles” from Spain. Encloses a copy of his letter to Clark on this subject and Clark’s answer. “It seems that Captain Vidal has no authority to grant Lands or even to authorise a Location, but...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 12 February 1806, New Orleans. “Captain Ross returned to this City on this morning—and I now enclose for your perusal, a copy of his Report to me.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 59, TP , Orleans, vol. 8). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Claiborne; docketed by Wagner. For enclosure, see n. 1. The enclosure (3 pp.; docketed by Wagner; printed in Carter,...
20 February 1804, New Orleans. “The citizens of Louisiana passing by water to the United States or to Europe, have requested of me passports or letters of protection. No instructions having been given me on this subject, I have acted with some reluctance; but upon the exercise of my best judgment I thought the request was reasonable, and have given to such applicant an instrument of writing,...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 31 October 1805, New Orleans. “In consequence of the embarrassments to which the Commerce of the United States is exposed by the exaction of heavy duties at the Town of Mobile; the various reports which have reached me of the Hostile disposition of the Spaniards, and of the War-like preparations at Pensacola and at other places in the vicinity of this Territory,...
6 February 1805, New Orleans . “The Press in this City is indeed becoming licentious; it even menaces the tranquility of private life, but hitherto the Executive of the Territory has been the principal object of abuse. I am happy However to add, that the Louisianians have no concern in the abusive publications, and very generally disapprove of them. The discontented party are composed...
Major William Nott of Louisiana a native Citizen of the United States and President of the New Orleans Insurance Company, having understood that the Office of Consul for the United States at the Port of Bordeaux, in France would soon become vacant, has solicited me to name him to you as a Candidate for the honor of that appointment. I feel no hesitation in representing Major Nott as meriting...
I have the honor to inclose you a List of the Gentlemen recommended by the House of Representatives of this Territory, as legislative Councillors. Messrs. Mc.Carty and Bellechasse possess a great share of the public confidence, and are unquestionably, very honest, good men,—they each hold Commissions as Colonels in the militia, and I have every reason to believe them well disposed to the...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 6 July 1805, New Orleans. “On the third Instant the Legislative Council was pror[o]gued Sine die, and I have the Honor to enclose for your perusal a Copy of a Short address which I made on the occasion. Perhaps you will perceive on my part a greater share of feeling than ought to have been manifested; but the late State of party here was Such, that I could not...
I cannot hear, without much anxiety, of the great events which are passing in Europe. The whole Continent seems to have acknowledged the superiority of France, and it is probable that England will ultimately submit to the Will of Bounaparte. When Armies are destroyed in a day, and Nations rise and fall in a month,—you will I trust excuse me in expressing my solicitude to hear of the present...
13 July 1804, New Orleans. “The Memorial to Congress, of which I have lately Spoken in several of my official letters, is in circulation, and has obtained many signatures. I have seen one sheet of the original manuscript; it is in the hand writing of Edward Livingston, and the whole was no doubt written by that gentleman, by and with the advice of Daniel Clark and Evan Jones. “The Memorial is...
I did not until a few days ago receive your Letter of the 26th of March, and I pray you to be assured that its contents shall receive my careful attention. Mr. Briggs is now in this City, and in the Course of a few days the Location and Survey on the Canal of Carondelet, will be made under his immediate direction; and the result shall be transmitted to you without delay. I do not know, that on...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 28 May 1806, New Orleans. “I pray you to lay before the President of the United States, the inclosed letters from Messrs. Destréhan and Sauvé, resigning their Seats in the Legislative Council; together with copies of my answers thereto. Colonel Bellechasse had also written his letter of resignation—but has since been induced not to forward it. “The services of...
16 June 1804, New Orleans. “I have the Honour to enclose you an estimate of the expense which will attend the support of the Government of the Orleans Territory for one year ensuing the 1st of October next. “The Council being appointed by the President, and their ⅌ diem allowance fixed by a Law of Congress, I have supposed their pay would be drawn from the Treasury of the United States; but I...