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The bill to protect foreign seamen, has been again debated this day, and various alterations in it made—It is less obnoxious than at first, but still contains mischief enough to produce very ill consequences—Duane made his appearance this day to report the debate—The first time for many weeks; indeed I believe the first time since the debate on the Amendment to the Constitution. No other...
I continue as long as possible to send you my gazette; but I now hope in the course of three weeks to leave Berlin—I have written to engage a passage for myself and family, on board the Catherine, Captain Ingersoll; from Hamburg for New–York. No opportunity for Boston occurs from that place; nor do I know of any from Bremen or either of the dutch ports—Besides which the journey from New–York...
I have very much regretted, my dear Sir, that the severity of the Season has deprived us of the pleasure of spending the Sunday with you for so many weeks; but it affords me some consolation that you have found so agreeable a companion in La Harpe, whose work I was well assured would prove a great source of entertainment to you—The volumes containing his account of the philosophy of the 18th:...
I have already written you a very long letter in answer to your favour of the 8th: instt:—and after writing it, upon reading it over concluded the best disposition I could make of it would be to burn it—Accordingly the flames have consumed it, and I must begin again. Your answers and observations upon my inquiries respecting the impressment of our seamen by the British are of the highest...
As I am informed there is a vessel soon to sail from Amsterdam for Boston I now forward to Mr. Bourne to go by her, this letter enclosing copies of my numbers 2 and 3. upon the Etat de la France &c. The book itself will go with the copy of my first letter concerning it, from Hamburg—Hauterive has generally been given out as its author; but Talleyrand himself is now understood to have had the...
I have two letters from you which ought to have been answered some time since, but I have only one apology for the delay, which I have so often mentioned that I am almost ashamed to repeat it. I have no time for writing except when the Senate is in Session, and when such business is before them, as I can suffer to proceed without paying much attention to it.—We have now come to sit on...
Since writing the within letter, I have seen Coll. Smith, who informs me that my Sister will probably have left you before this arrives—So I shall direct the whole to you. My wife has so far recovered that we think of going on this day as far as Elizabeth Town, and hope to proceed further on our journey to-morrow. But She is still so weak, that I am not a little apprehensive on her account—...
I have received, and communicated to this Government, my recall from the mission here—I shall hasten my departure as much as possible; but the situation of my wife who is still confined to her bed, renders it uncertain when she will be able to travel at all, and yet more when to undertake the voyage. If a favourable opportunity from Hamburg for Boston occurs I shall give it the preference—But...
It is my intention during the short time that I expect to remain here, to send you from time to time such new publications in the french language, as may fall in my way, and appear to promise entertainment or matter of interesting meditation for you. With this design I purpose to combine another, which I am at least desirous to render of some utility to my Country.—The translation from Journal...
This prohibition of the admission of slaves into Louisiana, is like the drawing of a jaw tooth—We have expedient after expedient introduced to answer this purpose—Breckenridge has at last concentrated all his wisdom on the subject in the Amendment, which I now inclose you. This is a tolerably good device to reconcile the two parties of slave and anti-slave into which the majority are divided....
You will find, in the multitude of public documents, which I constantly transmit to you, the only apology I have to offer, for the irregularity which has crept upon the returns to your most valuable letters—Though I find it utterly impossible even to read all these papers, yet I feel it an indispensible duty to peruse with attention the greater part of them, and some of them require even a...
The foreign Seamen Law, was yesterday postponed to the first Monday in December.—yeas 21. nays 11.—I was not present at the vote having been obliged to attend the Supreme Court, to argue my second Cause before them—This I began yesterday, and finished this morning. Mr: L. Martin of Baltimore is at this moment occupied as the scissars of my arguments —(You know where this comes from.)—I have...
I enclosed under a blank cover to you a copy of the President’s Message, on the day when it was delivered, and having now to enclose a letter from my wife to my Mother, and a bill which has already pass’d both houses of Congress I cannot forbear writing a line with it, to recall myself to your kind remembrance. You will perceive that the message is in a style and tone which have not been...
The gazette , of which you will find the first number enclosed, is intended to give you a concise & comprehensive view of the principal occurences in every part of Europe—My project is during the remainder of my stay here, to send you twice a month a similar sheet, comprizing a period of the same length of time. It will perhaps seldom give you news , but it will concentrate information, which...
The Fire and Marine Insurance Office are now repaying the third part of their capital, to which they were authorized by an Act of the Legislature; and issuing new Certificates to the Stockholders—The old Certificates must therefore be returned into the Office—I will thank you to send me, by the earliest opportunity, your Certificate for the forty shares, which stand in my name, but of which...
I enclose herewith the second number of my Gazette, which completes the Journal for the month of March. By the last post I sent to Hamburg a letter for my mother, with the information that on the 12th: inst. my wife was delivered of a son. But she was then extremely ill, & I wrote under the impression of great alarm on her account. She has since very much recovered, & as I am assured quite out...
You will see by the folio sheet I inclose to you, that the House of Representatives have not yet done with the Government of Louisiana.—The fourth Section is the only one in which there seems much difficulty to the Legislators of the day—Many attempts were made to vary that here, and they are renewed in the House—They sport with Louisiana, as a Cat sports with a mouse—But to help our...
A letter is now reading from Captain Bainbridge, with an account of the loss of the frigate Philadelphia, wreck’d on rocks on the coast of Tripoli—the last week in October—They were in pursuit of a Tripolitan Cruizer, and struck on rocks, not laid down in any Chart they had on board —Captain Bainbridge and 307 men, are prisoners in Tripoli—I have already seen an account of this misfortune in...
After a passage of 58 days from Hamburg we have this day landed here, where we purpose to stay five or six days—My wife will then go to spend a few weeks with her parents at Washington, and I shall hasten towards Quincy where I hope within three weeks to present myself before you—Her health though yet very infirm is better than we could have expected, and your little Grandson is as hearty as...
I received your favor of the 23d instant the evening before last, and am happy to find you enjoying so good spirits amid the discomfiture of honest principles which has occurred in our old parent Massachusetts. This event, though altogether unexpected to me, is easily accounted for after it has happened. I do not, however, impute it to the measures adopted by the Legislature at their summer...
It is sometimes said that suspense is worse than the certainty of evil—But it is a hard relief from suspense to be informed of evils worse than were apprehended. From the length of time which had pass’d without bringing me a letter from you, I felt great anxiety; but it was principally for the dear child, whom I had left so unwell—Your letter when it came, announced to me not only the child...
I have received only one letter from you—that of 25. Novr: since I left you—And none from any of my other friends—Though I accustom myself to Patience in the expectation of Letters I begin to feel extremely anxious; lest some of you should be ill—The Mails have been interrupted by the obstructions in the Roads, and I have imputed the delay of your letters to this as long as I could—But we have...
I have to thank you for the receipt of your letter of the 14th: instt: and for the last number of the Anthology, which came at the same time—I am much pleased with the Spirit of this publication which appears to improve as it advances, and which I hope you will not suffer to flag—I am much flattered by the partiality of the opinion entertained by the Gentlemen that a regular contribution from...
We arrived safe at Providence on the Evening of the day when we took leave of you in Boston; and the next morning embarked in a Packet which was ready to sail. We were however detained at anchor just below Providence the whole of that day, and the next Night—On Monday we effected with much difficulty our passage to Newport, and sailed from thence on Tuesday Morning—We had every possible...
I yesterday submitted three resolutions to the consideration of the Senate, of which it is probable you will hear more, and perhaps to some federalists in your quarter, they will be thought as wonderful and as lamentable, as one or two of my votes on former occasions. They were rejected by the Senate, with no small degree of indignation express’d by the majority—The yeas and nays, on the two...
Finding by your letter of 5. December that it will not be convenient to you to send me the 500 dollars, as I proposed in my last, I shall be satisfied with your own offer, and request you would deposit that money with my sister, when you go to New-York in February—I expect to pass through that City myself in March or April, and can then receive it from her—I shall be also content to have the...
I have nothing new to tell you from this place. I have no letter from you of later date than 25. Novr:—My purpose now besides enquiring how you and the children, are is to enclose the within from Kitty to Caroline. Our weather for some days past has been very bad—Snow-Hail-Rain and Sleet have followed one another in uninterrupted succession—It was so bad last Evening that the Ladies could not...
Your letter of the 16th: brought me consolation and hope in the information that you were all getting well—My anxiety on account of my mother has been extreme; having heard through Mr: Cranch & Mr: Quincy, that she had been very dangerously ill—I learn also that George is at Mr. Cranch’s I am still waiting for my Cause to be called in Court—It was called again the day before yesterday; but Mr:...
To receive the money, from John Green—and settle with Captain Brazier for the blinds. To receive the monies on the Accounts of Mr: Poor, of Newbury-Port. of Mr: W. Coolidge P. C. Brooks. of Mr: McIntire of Captn: Fenno. To attend to the Exon: of H. College vs Simpson. Do:—on the actions at Dedham. To receive on the 18th: of Novr: $140:89—for Rent of the House in Court Street, and $150 every...
I now enclose you the two bills, together with an order upon the Bank at Boston for their amount—which I hope will reach you by Christmas—You will see that the order is made payable to Mr: Shaw, who will receive and pay you the money.—I will thank you to get receipts upon the bills and forward them to me; as Mr: Hellen must have them. The party at Mr: Madison’s yesterday was almost entirely...
I duly received your letters of the 21st: enclosing the pamphlet of Gentz, and likewise the post-note, with your account—This last I have not yet examined, but I presume it to be substantially correct.—I am again to repeat my thanks for your attention to my affairs. I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you soon here, though I hope also that the tremendous menaces of malignant yellow fever at...
I take the first moment of self-possession that I have to inform you that my dear wife at half-past eight this morning presented me a third son.—The labour which commenced about 2 O’Clock this morning was extremely severe, and the child and mother both suffered so much in the birth as to give us great concern—We had at first little hopes of the child’s life; but it is now and Mrs: Adams also...
Since my last letter to you, I have not had the pleasure of receiving a line from you—I have it not yet in my power to unpack my books, and consequently not to take out and send you those belonging to you. But I have sent you a set of the Massachusetts Laws, and a copy of the translation from Bülow, by the Sylvia; Captain Seth Daggett, who has already sailed, and will probably reach...
I left New-York last Thursday morning the 12th: at 9 O’Clock in the Packet Cordelia, the same we went in last October—Friday evening we reached Providence, after a short, but very boisterous passage—Yesterday, I came from Bost Providence to Boston, and here last Evening—Mr: Otis and Patty had been equally prosperous in their passage, and arrived in Boston last Monday, the eighth day after we...
I wrote a line to my father, from New-York, enclosing a letter for Mr: Shaw, and informing you of our safe arrival thus far, upon our Journey.—We stopp’d at New-York two days, and then proceeded with as much expedition as we found practicable, untill we reached Baltimore. We stopp’d only one Night at Philadelphia, and had no opportunity to visit any of our acquaintance there—We came on in the...
I will thank you to pay to my father, for me, on or before the 22d: of this month eleven hundred and seventy two dollars and forty-nine cents—being $1081.27. for part principal of a debt due from me to him and $91.22. for a quarter’s interest on the same debt—As you have probably not funds sufficient in your hands to make this payment I enclose you an order to receive the money due to me at...
The inclosed bill is now before the House of Representatives of the United States, and will probably pass there, perhaps with some modifications—As it appears to me to interest most materially the commercial part of the Community I send you this copy, with a hope that you will favour me with your opinion, and those of other gentlemen in trade among our friends in Boston, upon its general...
I inclosed to you last week a copy of a bill now pending before the House of Representatives here, purporting to be a bill for the protection of American Seamen; but really intended to assert the pretension of protecting foreign, and particularly British Seamen, against the legal authority of their own Government, within its own jurisdiction .—I also promised to send you a copy of another bill...
I wrote my mother from Providence, an account of our progress thus far, but the narrative since that time is so far from being agreeable that it will be more expedient to make the present communication to you— After being two days detained for want of wind at Providence, where Mr. Otis left us and came on by land, we came down on Tuesday last, the 4th: to Newport—We were there again wind bound...
I enclose my third letter upon the book concerning the State of France. I know not whether I shall have time to finish this examination, & my project of furnishing you with frequent articles upon foreign politics & literature, will of course cease by my recall, which I have now received. As I suppose it was known to you, some days after it took place, you will probably not write to me again,...
This is the last Time I shall write you from this place for the present—I have determined to accelerate my departure, and not wait untill the 22d. as I had heretofore proposed—On Wednesday next it is my intention to take passage in the Stage for Providence, but as the Stages now commence on the Winter establishment I do not expect to reach New-York earlier than the 22d: There I purpose to stop...
I have received an invitation from Mr: Boylston, to dine with him to-morrow—If you see him in town between this and then, will you be so good as to tell him that I much regret that I cannot come, as to-morrow at 2. O’Clock I commence my course of Lectures—And having already postponed it for two weeks, I cannot put it off again. To-day also I am detained here, on account of the Declamations—But...
I must request you to sell my 3600 dollars of Stock in the Bank of North America, at as good a price as you can obtain, and remit me as speedily as possible the proceeds; retaining in your hands as much as may satisfy all your demands against me, and all demands which may be made to you on my account—I say remit me the proceeds as speedily as possible , because I am in very great want of money...
Your favour of the 22d: ulto: came to hand a few days since—If it suits your convenience to keep the horse at the original cost it will be perfectly agreeable to me; my wish to have him sold was only upon the supposition that he was of no use to you. I received at the same time with your last letter one from Mr: Cranch, in which he declines undertaking the Administration of Mr. Johnson’s...
Last Evening I received your’s of the 14th: which makes me anxious to hear from you again—Your sore throat and George’s cough will keep me upon thorns untill I hear better tidings of you—I am perhaps the more susceptible on this subject from the heavy calamity so recently befallen the family here.—It is vain to lament or to anticipate—and would be vain to attempt expressing what I feel. The...
Having remained nearly two years, without any answer whatsoever , to proposals, which at two different periods I made, and which were transmitted to you, by your brother Coll: W. S. Smith, for the settlement of your note for $2000 and interest due me. I some time since had concluded, that my only resource would be to measures of a more decisive nature—But considering the relation in which I...
I have occasion to draw bills of exchange to the amount of about one thousand pounds sterling upon Messrs: Bird, Savage and Bird in London, and it appears by the newspapers that exchange on London is higher at Philadelphia than it is here—The bills will be at sixty days sight—If you can get any thing above par , or even par for such bills, to that amount, let me know by the return of the post,...
I was two days last week at Dedham, where there was a Court sitting, at which I had something to do—On Friday evening I received your letter of the 17th: of last Month—Yesterday, being at Boston I found your’s of the 24th: and rejoyce to hear of your all being so well—They ought not to have charged you with postage for my last Letter—However, 20 Cents is not worth disputing with them. Mr: and...
I arrived here in three days from New-York, last Monday Evening, the 21st: instt:—I found my father in good health and spirits—My mother has been very unwell, but I am happy to tell you is upon the recovery. Whitcomb got here two days ago, and brought me, your facetious letter of the 18th:—with the Port-Folio, for which I give you my thanks—But it is still incomplete for the prospectus , is...
I have received your kind letter of January; and shall particularly attend to your directions at Philadelphia, respecting the flour—It is at present my intention to leave this place the 4th: of next month; but the winter and the roads are now breaking up; so that I know not whether the roads will at that time be passable The termination of this Congress will leave our public affairs in a...