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To the People of the State of New-York. AN objection of a nature different from that which has been stated and answered, in my last address, may perhaps be likewise urged against the principle of legislation for the individual citizens of America. It may be said, that it would tend to render the government of the Union too powerful, and to enable it to absorb in itself those residuary...
It was the desire of the Revd Dr Gordon who, a few days ago, embarked for Europe, that according to his own practice I would weekly send to you the Independent Chronicle printed in this Town. I have the honor of enclosing one of the Papers for your Excellency at this time; requesting you to permit me to assure you that it will afford me very great satisfaction to continue so to do in a regular...
5330th. (Adams Papers)
Mr. A. met Mr. Jefferson, at Paris, in the forenoon. 31 The Marquis de la Fayette was here in the evening. He appears very well satisfied with his last voyage to America.
I reciev’d a few days since your Letter of Sepr. 12th and yesterday that of october the 12th and thank you most sincerly for them both. Your account of Holland entertaind me much. You must have improv’d your time well to have visited so many places and notic’d so much. The fatigue was too great for you. It was this that made you sick. I was rejoic’d to find your dissorder whatever it was for...
I received the honor of your letter of yesterday, and in consequence thereof send you eight guineas. I mentioned to you that the settlement of Mr. Wayles’s affairs remained entirely with Mr. Eppes and Mr. Skipwith the acting executors. They alone possess the evidences of his debts and paiments, and they also alone know what is due, and to whom. I think it possible, and even probable, that the...
Tho I have already acknowledged all your Letters, I will not let captain Scoet sail without a few lines from me, I had not time to write you by Barnard, but Cushing had Letters for you I write now to inform you, that the more quarrelsome and turbulent you grow, the more anxious I am to be with you, not that I think it pleasent fishing in troubled waters, but because immagination paints higher...
At a meeting of the Officers of the Continental line in October last to appoint officers of the State Society of Cincinnati; It was there resolv’d, that no officer not holding a Continental Commission should be entitled to become a member —As I saw it in a different light from the Gentlemen that compos’d that Body; I beg leave to lay before your Excellency the State & progress, of the Regiment...
5814th. (Adams Papers)
Dined at Lincoln, and immediately after dinner we again proceeded on our journey and by 5 o’clock, got to Cambridge, which is 12 miles: we came through Concord , and Lexington which 12 years ago were of no note, but which have been since rendered ever memorable, by being the place, where the first martyrs in the glorious cause of American Liberty, bled, (April 19th. 1775). Posterity will...
59[Diary entry: 17 February 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 17th. Thermometer at 38 in the Morning—52 at Noon and 48 at Night. A thick fog till 9 oclock A.M. when it dispelled; was clear and pleasant till towards Sunsetting when the western horison seemed to cloud & lower. Wind Southerly all day but the ground very wet—Snow all dissolved where the Sun had access. Rid to my Mill, and the Plantations at Muddy hole, Dogue Run & ferry. Sent for...
I Received your Excellency’s letter concerning the Cyphers . The Vessel that I am in here, and bound to America, Doth not take pradick and all papers are so Defaced with Vinager, that it will be Imposible to get the Cypher sound, to hand’s where it is ordered. Therefore must Deliver the Same to Congress, whom can Dispose of the Same at their pleasure . I am unhappy that it is so surcomstanced:...
Since Mrs. Adams’s Departure I have revolved within myself, whether you would not have an Inclination to purchase the piece of Land on Pens Hill (belonging to the Estate of the Honle. James Verchild late of St. Kitts deceased) which you have for some years past improved. His Heirs, I am informed, are now in England, that the Estate in the West Indies is under Mortgage, But that part of it...
I had proposed writing by the present opportunity, before I received your letter of Jany the 1st on tuesday last. Return you my most sincere thanks for your good wishes. The second volume will be printed off I expect by the end of the week after next. The first begins with the settlement of the several colonies, & comes down to & takes in the Lexington engagement. The second finishes with the...
The enclosed letter from the clerk of the H. Delegates will inform you that the marquess’s thanks to the assembly have been presented. The resolution directing the Bust was order’d to be carried into execution by the commercial agent who was soon after dismiss’d from office, it never came to my hands till I sent for it yesterday, I will endeavour to have it comply’d with tho’ like other...
64[Diary entry: 25 February 1788] (Washington Papers)
Monday 25th. Thermometer at 32 in the Morning—48 at Noon and 46 at Night. Calm and clear Morning. Wind Southerly afterwards which occasioned a considerable thaw. Mr. Fairfax going away directly after breakfast I rid to the Plantations in the Neck—at Muddy hole and Dogue run. At the first (that is the Neck) the Women were grubbing & fencing along the Creek. At Muddy hole doing the same. The...
The letter which you did me the honor to write to me on the 16th of October only came to hand the 28th of last month. My particular acknowledgments are due to you for your recollection of and attention to me; and I pray you to be assured of the pleasure I felt at hearing that the place lately filled by Mr de Marbois, near the Sovereignty of these States, was so happily supplied—On this...
I labour under Many Afflictions On Acct of the Orphans, Money is Such a Scarce Article amongst us, that there are scarcely coming at any, the Rents & profits of the Estate wou’d (could they be Collected) plentifully Answer all demands—but Fortitude & Patience is my only resource—However in the space of two or three Months I hope to be able to remit £200—I have Sent a Small Supply at present of...
I have received your letter of the 21st of July together with the Treatise on Agriculture & practical Husbandry. I consider the latter as a mark of attention which merits my warmest acknowledgments. It is a subject highly worthy the attention of every gentleman in this country who has leisure, abilities, or opportunity to improve it. It is the only source from which we can at present draw any...
I congratulate you upon the success of that inestimable Constitution, which I had the honor to witness your weighty and influential support and approbation of; and it is with singular pleasure I stand informed, that you have the unanimous suffrages of the Electors, to fill the Chair of first President. I take the liberty to solicit Your Excellency for an appointment as Collector or receiver of...
69[Diary entry: 22 October 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 22d. Thermometer at 49 in the Morning 60 at Noon and 60 at Night. Clear all day with the Wind (especially in the Night) fresh from So. Wt. Sent Mrs. O’Conner to Alexa. Rid to the Plantations at the Ferry, French’s & Dogue run. At the latter, the hands from the two first except the Ferry men & Carts, together with their plows as were the Plows of Muddy were all at work digging...
I have the pleasure to inform you that after a good deal of trouble, I obtain’d a sauf Conduit yesterday evening about nine or ten oClock. Mr. de Villedeuil behaved on this occasion with the greatest Politeness. His situation I believe was a little embarrassing as the arrest preceded the Sauf Conduit , and was not therefore easily laid aside. However I insisted on my Character as a Publick...
I received your favor of May 9. just as I was stepping into the barge on my departure from Cette: which prevented my answering it from that place. On my arrival here, I thought I would avail myself of the opportunity of paying your balance to make a little acquaintance with Sr. John Lambert. One or two unsuccessful attempts to find him at home, with the intermediate procrastinations well known...
Books sold to Colo. Monroe s Chastellux Felicité publique. 2.v. 13. 6  Helvetius de l’homme. 3.v. 13. 6. Gravina l’esprit des loix Romaines 3.v. 19. Barbeyrac discours. 2.v. 10. Vicat Droit naturel. 2.v. 15. Felice. droit de la nature 18. Certitude de Mahometisme 13. 6 Oeuvres de Mably. 4.v.
I had the pleasure of receiving your Letter from Paris of the 18 th. March just before I embarked from Ireland for America— but had not the pleasure till my Arrival here of being informed that you were appointed Minister to the Court of London where we are told that you are removed with your Family & where I expect this to meet you Since my Arrival which was in May I have postponed writing to...
Since my arrival here I have written you two or three hasty letters—being constantly involved in Business or Company from wh. it would not be here very practicable or perhaps prudent to retreat, I have been able to write but very little—The Convention this moment adjourned and I am writing in their Chamber—a Question being about to be put on the mode of adoption which you have seen, we moved...
I am much obliged to you for your judicious Letter of Oct r. 15. you have described the Causes of the present Evil with Accuracy, and the Cure is equally obvious. I mean a partial Cure— as far as the difficulty arises from Property having been thrown by the Course of the War into Hands, unable to hold it, there is no remedy but time & the Course of Law, in this respect, the present times...
76[Diary entry: 31 January 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 31st. Thermometer at 42 in the Morning—40 at Noon and 34 at Night. The morning was a little cloudy but the weather soon cleared with a brisk No. Wester which occasioned a great change in the air. Planted a few pine trees in my Wildernesses.
Your favour of 21st instant came to my hands Yesterday: and I now comply with your request as far as in my power. The report of the Committee of Council at Quebec to Lord Dorchester was sent early in the last Spring by a Gentleman of Glasgow to a friend of mine, as an authentick paper transmitted to the British Ministry. It seems Canada is now divided into two Provences, and the part of it...
7821st. (Adams Papers)
This day the Seniors leave, College; there is no recitation in the morning, and prayers are deferred till 10 o’clock. The Class then went down in procession two by two, with the Poet at their head, and escorted the President to the Chapel. The President made a very long prayer, in which in addition to what he commonly says he pray’d a great deal for the Seniors: but I think he ought to get his...
7911th. (Adams Papers)
Paris Afternoon. Coll. Humphreys and Mr. Short, went with us to see Astley’s equestrian exercises which, may be seen once or twice with pleasure, but which are tiresome, to one who has seen them as often as I have. Astley exhibits from October till february in Paris, and the rest of the year in London. His Amphitheatre here, is generally very full: he might make a very large fortune, but...
Letter not found. Ca. 3 June 1788 . Mentioned in Brown to JM, 7 June 1788 . Encloses resolution of Congress concerning the independence of Kentucky.
This will be delivered you by Colo. Le Maire. You knew him when in our service, and that he was one of the few who merited what was done for him. He returns to Virginia to obtain the land given him for his special services and what is due to him as an officer. He is reduced to extreme poverty and I am afraid will meet with difficulty to subsist till he can obtain his grants unless he can find...
Permit one of the lowest of the people to approach you with every sentiment of Gratitude and Respect which has been, or can be expressed by any individual, or collective Body in the Union. Likewise to intrude upon your patience with a request, which if inconsistent with your inclination to admit, must rely on your well-known candour to pardon the impertinent intrusion. I am a person Sir of a...
834th. (Adams Papers)
I began this day to translate the Eclogues of Virgil. What a difference between this Study, and that of a dry barren greek Grammar. But without sowing the grain there certainly can be no harvest, and there is no Rose, without a thorn. I have been invited to several places, but as yet have had to plead, as an excuse, that my trunks are not come, and I have no Clothes to appear decently in....
84[Diary entry: 7 March 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 7th. Thermometer at 34 in the Morning—⟨4⟩6 at Noon and 42 at Night. Morning clear & calm—grd. a little frozen. Wind pretty fresh afterwards from the Northwest—notwithstanding which it lowered a good deal towards evening. I rid to Muddy hole and Dogue run Plantations and by the grd. where the ferry hands were at work.
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 226–7. I have just received your very kind letter of the 16th past. I rejoice sincerely to hear of your safe return to your own country, family and friends, and of the success of your election. It is a pleasing reflection arising from the contemplation of...
I receivd the Letter which you did me the honor to write me, as well as the institution of the Cincinnatus Society formd by the American Army, I am much flatterd to be comprisd in a military Society the members of which have with So much glory concurrd under the Orders of your Excellency to establish American Liberty, but it gives me great pain to See, that all the General Officers of the Sea,...
87[Diary entry: 15 March 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 15th. Thermometer at 46 in the Morning—58 at Noon And 56 at Night. The Wind, tho’ there was but little of it, was at No. Wt. Mild and warm. Visited all the Plantations. At all of them, the full compliment of Plows were at work and going on very well. In the Neck, the Women were spreading Dung on the ground intended for Oats and Barley—being the West part of No. 2. At this place ⟨also⟩...
Your private Letter of the twenty fifth of July is very friendly and obliging as usual. give yourself no concern about my apprehensions of your Want of Attention. I know too well your constant and assiduous applications to the Duties of your public offices, as well as to the just concerns of your private friends, ever to suspect you of failing in either.—I Shudder when I think of your next...
Your favor of the 2d. inst. is duly received. I agree chearfully to the alteration you propose, in our terms, for converting the current into sterling money. It will guard against injustice, should the madness of paper money invade our assembly. I send you the inclosed paper finally settling this business. I am not well acquainted with the situation of your matter in Virginia. I had hoped that...
I have duly received your favor accompanying that of Mr. Van bram Houckgeete on the subject of a cask of snuff sent by him to Bordeaux. The importation of that article is prohibited by the laws of France on pain of fine and forfeiture of the article to the Farmers general. His snuff was seized and condemned on due process of law. He sais he was ignorant of the law, and I believe it: his...
91[Diary entry: 12 November 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 12th. Thermometer at 44 in the Morning—52 at Noon and 51 at Night. Wind at So. Wt. all day & pleasant—Clear in the morning, but a little lowering towards 3 oclock—clear afterwards. The force of yesterday was employed in the roads to day. Mrs. and Miss Stuart went away after breakfast. I rid to the repairers of the Road and to my New Barn—the Rafters of which were all raised about...
This letr. is written purposely to inform you of the project mentioned to you in New york concerning the land at the Great falls. The quantity is 500 acres, the price may be called 4,000£ with the incumbrance of an annual rent of 150£ sterling. The advantages infinitely exceed that of any spot of ground in the U. States. The canal runs thro the land, & the bason is in the land, the situation...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society I have received a Letter from a very respectable Person in America, containing the following Words, Viz “It is confidently reported, propagated, and believed by some among us, that the Court of France was at bottom against our obtaining the Fishery and Territory in that great Extent in which both are secured to us by the Treaty; that our Minister at that...
Your favor of the 25th in answer to mine of the preceeding week, came safely. At the time I wrote that letter, I was uninformed of the circumstances which you have since made me acquainted with. However, you will be at no loss from the contents of it, to discern that it was Bargains I had in contemplation; and which, from the quantity of Goods at Market—Scarcity of Cash, according to Newspaper...
I have the most melancholy Task to perform, that was ever yet imposed upon me; that of making you acquainted with the Death of my poor Brother Tench. Painful however as it is, I thought a duty not to be dispensed with towards one for whom he had so high a Reverence & so warm an Attachment as for yourself. Not above three days before his death every symptom bade fair for a speedy Recovery, when...
M. Jefferson est tres sensible à la perte que l’Espagne vient de faire par la mort de son auguste Souverain. Les vertus de ce prince lui avoient merité à juste titre l’hommage de l’estime universelle, et repandront sur sa mort les regrets de tous. M. Jefferson y mele les siens trés sincerement, et a l’honneur de faire à M. l’Ambassadeur son compliment de condoleance. Dft ( ViU ); written at...
I took the first opportunity to send your Present of Books to my friend the Marquis de la Fayette and have this Morning received the inclosed Letter for you from that Nobleman. Let me avail myself of this opportunity of presenting my thanks for your obliging present of Books to me. you have merited the respect and Esteem of all Men amongst whom Liberty and Humanity are not disregarded by your...
[ St. Croix, May 31, 1785. On June 22, 1785, Hamilton wrote to James Hamilton : “I have received your letter of the 31st of May last.” Letter not found. ] James Hamilton was H’s older brother. See H to James Hamilton, June 22, 1785, note 1 .
I came to this place to day, tomorrow (wind permitting) I shall cross the Bay on my way to Philadelphia—Hearing that a Ship with Servants is gone up to Baltimore, and fearing from your answer to my letter (written some time ago from Mount Vernon) that I had not sufficiently explained my meaning I beg leave to inform you that tho’ I should have preferred German Servants, yet I did not mean to...
100[Diary entry: 21 February 1786] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 21st. Thermometer at 40 in the Morning—40 at Noon and 38 at N. Clear, with the wind pretty fresh at No. West in the forenoon calm afterwards. A Mr. McPherson of Alexandria came & returned before dinner. His business was, to communicate the desires of a Neighbourhood in Berkeley County, to build a School & Meeting House on some Land of mine there, leased to one . My answer was, that if...