You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Confederation Period

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Confederation Period"
Results 1-30 of 17,348 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
11 Nov . [ 1785 ]. Extend dinner invitation to TJ and David Humphreys for that day on the part of Chalut de Verin of the farmers-general; they are to be at the Place Vendôme at two o’clock. D’Estaing will also attend. The Abbés are grateful to TJ for forwarding the letter from Adams. RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; dated “Vendredi lle. 9bre.”; addressed.
17. Apr. [ 1785 ]. Accept dinner invitation for Tuesday, 19 Apr. RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; in French; addressed: “A Monsieur Monsieur Jefferson ministre plenipotentiaire des Etats-unis d’Amerique Dans son Hotel.” The two Abbés’ names are often misspelled, particularly that of Abbé Arnoux, whose name is also frequently confused with that of the Abbé François Arnaud (1721–1784). They lived on the...
Paris, 13 Nov. 1785 . Extend dinner invitation to TJ and his party for that day on the part of Chalut de Verin of the Farmers General; they hope “ qu’il ne lui restera aucune raison de refus .” RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; dated: “dimanche 12. 9bre. 1785”; addressed. Since 12 Nov. 1785 fell on a Saturday, the date of this letter has been corrected to the 13th. TJ evidently had declined the invitation for...
Les abbés de Chalut et Arnoux ont l’honneur de faire leurs compliments à Monsieur jefferson et de Le prier de la part de M. de Chalut de Lui faire L’honneur d’aller diner chez lui à St. Cloud jeudi prochain 30 juin. M. de Chalut fait la meme priere à M. Le Colonel humphries et à M. Williasmos il espere qu’ils voudront bien être de la partie. Les deux abbés iront diner à St. Cloud ce jour là,...
24 May 1785 . Accept TJ’s invitation. RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; in French; addressed.
[ Rouen, 29 Aug. 1786 . Recorded in SJL as received 2 Sep. 1786. Not found.]
We have received the Passeport your Excellence has been so good as to send us. Your two Cases are on Board of the Diligence L’Adelaide and we hope they will Come Safe in the hands of your Excellence. Here inclosed is a note of our Expences which have been paid to us by the Master of the Diligence to whom we beg of your Excellence to reimburse them. We are most respectfully Your Most obedient...
Bayonne, 29 Nov. 1788. Submits to TJ, as “Dépositaire des droits des Etats Unis et des faveurs que les traittés avec la france leur assurent,” a complaint concerning the importation of whale oil. The king’s arrêt of 28 Sep. last concerning the importation of foreign oils was sent to the port authority for Bayonne without any specification that an exception was to be made for the United States;...
Whilst all Denomination’s of People bless the happy occasion of your Excellency’s return to enjoy private and domestic felecity, Permit us Sir, (the Members of Lodge No. 39 lately establish’d in Alexandria) to assure Your Excellency that We as a Mystical Body rejoice in having a Brother so near us, Whose pre’eminent Benevolence has secured the Happiness of Millions, and that We shall esteem...
Tho I have already acknowledged all your Letters, I will not let captain Scoet sail without a few lines from me, I had not time to write you by Barnard, but Cushing had Letters for you I write now to inform you, that the more quarrelsome and turbulent you grow, the more anxious I am to be with you, not that I think it pleasent fishing in troubled waters, but because immagination paints higher...
Two days only are wanting to campleat six years since my dearest Friend first crost the Atlantick. But three months of the Six Years have been Spent in America. The airy delusive phantom Hope, how has she eluded my prospects. And my expectations of your return from month to month, have vanished “like the baseless Fabrick of a vision.” You invite me to you, you call me to follow you, the most...
As I did not write you by the last conveyance I will not omit the present. I supposed your sister had got a Letter for You, but I found afterwards that she did not send it, because she could not please herself. This Week I received your trunk which Mr. Dana brought with him. You cannot conceive the pleasure I took in looking it over. The Books it is true were in a language that I understand...
I hope if the Marquiss de la Fayette is returned to Paris he may be able to give us some account of Colln. Smith for whom we are not a little anxious, having no intelligence from him since the begining of September when he wrote that he should tarry at Berlin till the reviews were over which would be by the 20th. of that month and then should make the utmost expedition to Paris where his stay...
your two Letters of May 21 & 26 were yesterday deliverd. captain Scot has not yet got up. I hope by him to receive Letters from my other Friends. I have been not a little anxious that Barnard and Davis should arrive without a Letter either from Braintree or weymouth as this is to go by the packet, I will confine myself wholy to buisness and as mr Adams has written you respecting mr Borlands...
I thank you my dear Neice for your last kind Letter. There are no days in the whole year so agreable to me nor any amusements this Country can boast so gratifying to my Heart and mind as those days which bring me Letters from my Dear Friends. In them I always find the law of kindness written, and they solace my mind in the seperation. Could I, you ask, return to my (Rustick) cottage, and view...
Mrs Hay call’d upon me a sunday whilst I was gone to meeting to let me know that She expected to Sail in a few days for Newyork. When I saw her before she determined to go out in captain Lyde who will not go till the middle of April, but Captain Cooper is a British Bottom, and on board of him they will not have algerines to fear. I cannot but think She is right. I freely own I should be loth...
Your obliging favour by captain Folger came safe to Hand, and brought me the agreeable intelligence of my Eldest sons having received His degree, and performed his part to the satisfaction of his Friends, and his own credit. you know Sir from experience, that there is no musick sweeter in the Ears of parents, than the well earned praises of their children. I hope he will continue through Life...
Mr. Storer says the ship in which he is to embark will go down to day and that he shall go on Board tomorrow. I cannot let him depart without a few lines to you tho I wrote you so lately by Captain Lyde that I have nothing New to add. I have not been lately either to Court or the Play. I have made some visits into the Country to a couple of families who have been very polite to us. When we...
Your obliging Letter was handed me, on my return from a journey into Devonshire. it was one of the most agreeable excursions I ever made. The Season was delightfull, and we performd our journey by easy Stages, always sure to find good accommodations at the Inn’s. The whole country through which we travelled was like a Garden, and the cultivation Scarcly admits of an other improvement; I wish I...
I have sent by Captain Scott the Books you wrote for, and if there is any thing else in which I can serve either you or my cousins, I shall be happy to do it— it is with much pleasure I learn that my cousin W.S. is like to be so pleasingly connected, and with a family to whom both you, & my Late parent, were much attached by a long accquaintance, and established Friendship. Educated under...
I have been 16 days at sea, and have not attempted to write a single Letter; tis true I have kept a journal when ever I was able, but that must be close locked up; unless I was sure to hand it you with safety. Tis said of Cato the Roman censor, that one of the 3 things which he regreted during his Life, was going once by sea when he might have made his journey by land; I fancy the philosopher...
I wrote you by Captain Dashood just when I was about removeing from the Bath Hotel to Grovsnor Square, since which I have had a buisy time getting my House in order and procuring a thousand little necessaries for different countries have different fashions and what suits in one will not answer in an other. For instanc my kitchen furniture was made for a hearth fire none of which could be used...
Mr. Trumble will have the honour of delivering this to you. The knowledge you have of him, and his own merit will ensure him a favourable reception. He has requested a Letter from me, and I would not refuse him, as it gives me an opportunity of paying my respects to a Gentleman for whom I entertain the highest esteem, and whose portrait dignifies a part of our room , tho it is but a poor...
Your Letter by way of Amsterdam had a quick passage and was matter of great pleasure to me. I thank you for all your kind and Friendly communications, by which you carry my imagination back to my Friends and acquaintance; who were never dearer to me than they now are, tho distanced so far from them. I have really commiserated the unhappy Refugees more than ever, and think no severer punishment...
I have time only to write you a line or two, not expecting captain Bigolow to Sail so Soon. I was yesterday informd that he would not go till the middle of the week, but this morning he has sent for the Letters. I thought your sister had letters, but she says they are not ready. She wrote you by mr Jenks 3 weeks ago. I must refer you to your Friend Storer for further information as I have...
If I had thought you would so soon have Sent for your dear little Girl, I should have been tempted to have kept her arrival here, from you a secret. I am really loth to part with her, and she last evening upon petit’s arrival, was thrown into all her former distresses, and bursting into Tears, told me it would be as hard to leave me, as it was her Aunt Epps. She has been so often deceived that...
Yes my dear Neice, it was a Ceremony that one must study Some time to find out either utility or pleasure in it. I own tho I made one in the procession I could not help feeling foolish as I was parading first up one side of a very wide road, for a mile and half and then turning, and following down a vast number of Carriages upon the other as slow as if you was attending a funeral. By this...
Mr Adams being absent upon publick Buisness in Holland when your Letter came to Hand I take the Liberty of replying to it, as I know he will be so much hurried for time when he returns as to be unable to attend to private matters, but I can answer for him, and am sure that he harbours no resentment against mrs Ward but wishes both of you success in Life & will rejoice to find that you are in...
Mr. Adams has already written you that we arrived in London upon the 27 of May . We journey’d slowly and sometimes silently. I think I have somewhere met with the observation that nobody ever leaves paris but with a degree of tristeness. I own I was loth to leave my garden because I did not expect to find its place supplied. I was still more loth on account of the increasing pleasure, and...
I have just returnd from a visit to Moor Place Moor feilds, Where I have been to take leave of my much esteemed Friends, mr and Mrs Rogers, who set out on wedensday for France, and from thence are to sail in the April Packet for Newyork. Mr Rogers thinks it most for his benifit, and those connected with him, to quit England, and endeavour to adjust his affairs himself in America. She...