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Results 2491-2520 of 17,661 sorted by date (descending)
I had written the preceding letter yesterday, but it had [not] yet gone out of my hands when I received yours of the 11th. inst . I must refer you to my letter of Oct. 10. 1787. for an explanation of the credit I state on the next leaf for Watson’s Phil . III. as also for the maps. All I wished as to the maps was to avoid loss, which I shall not do, charging you 10d. a piece instead of 1/ a...
Your favor of the 11th. came to hand yesterday. With respect to the Vase it is not worth the trouble I have already given you. I will take it therefore as it is. Indeed I have ever found it dangerous to quit the road of experience. New essays generally fail: so I will leave to some body else to find out the manner of giving an elegant spout to that elegant machine.—I take the liberty of...
249316th. (Adams Papers)
Commencement day. I mounted my horse, somewhat early, and arrived at Cambridge by nine o’clock. The first Salutation I received as I was going into the College yard was “repent: for the kingdom of Heaven is at hand.” It was a crazy man; but without any great share of enthusiasm, for that sentence was the only thing he said; and he repeated it every two or three minutes during the whole...
Your mamma’s hand has been wholly unable to hold a pen, without exquisite pain, from the time of our arrival; and I am afraid your brothers have not done their duty in writing to you. Indeed, I scarcely know what apology to make for myself. Would you believe this is the first day that I have taken a pen into my hand since I came ashore? I am happy to hear from all quarters a good character of...
2495[Diary entry: 16 July 1788] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 16th. Thermometer at 74 in the Morning—80 at Noon and 78 at Night. The Morning was cloudy, a good deal of Rain having fallen about day break. Wind at East & varying between that and South. Cloudy all day. Visited all the Plantations—Plows stopped at all by the wet, & heaviness of the ground except in the Neck. Harvest impeded by the former—but I directed the grain at all to be cut...
Having once wrote you on the subject of my claim, I am unwilling to repeat it, as applications similar to mine, from their frequency must become troublesome. Altho Sir, my case has, by Congress, been referr’d to Mr Pierce he yet in a late letter to me signifies the necessity of referring to yr records with respect to my brevett, the resignation of wh. appears to be consider’d of course with a...
The answer from your Exellency to my Letters of the 15th May, with the flattering invitation to Mount-Vernon have induce me to visit Virginy, before I Settled my in the country. My ardent wishes will be Satisfied. I desired to know that man, to whom America so much was in detted for her Liberty, and, if the expences of the voyage, joined to the troubles of it, had it not forbidden, I Should...
The inclosed papers will give you the latest intelligence from Poughkepsie. It seems by no means certain what the result there will be. Some of the most sanguine calculate on a ratification. The best informed apprehend some clog that will amount to a condition. The question is made peculiarly interesting in this place, by its connexion with the question relative to the place to be recommended...
In your favor of the 8th. instant you mention that you had written to me in February last . This letter never came to hand. That of Apr. 24. came here during my absence on a journey thro’ Holland and Germany, and having been obliged to devote the first moments after my return to some very pressing matters, this must be my apology for not having been able to write to you till now. As soon as I...
I received last night your favor of the 13th. and am obliged to you for the search made in the post office for the Nuncio’s packet. With respect to the subject of your private note, I think I had the honor, in some former letter, of informing you that no Consular convention was as yet settled with this country, and that till there should be one it was not probable any appointment of Consuls...
Will any of your occasions for money, my dear Sir, admit of being put off a few days? Mr. Grand will indeed furnish the 50 Louis you desire, on my order; but it will be on the condition, always understood between him and me, that I repay it punctually the 1st. day of the next month. The 100 Louis he has before furnished you, I repaid him the 1st. day of this month. Since that I have been...
In my former letters I mentioned to you that not knowing exactly the balance I owed you when I set out from this place for Amsterdam, I had remitted from Amsterdam a bill of exchange to Mr. Trumbull praying him to pay you 15£ out of it. As I did not recollect his address, the letter was inclosed to Sr. Robt. Herreis, who not being able to find him returned it to my bankers in Amsterdam, with...
250315th. (Adams Papers)
Mr. West went away this morning; My Father and my brother Charles, went to Boston; whence they will proceed tomorrow to Cambridge. Beale came here this forenoon, and took a dinner with us. He is studying law, with Mr. Barnes at Taunton, but spends much of his time at home. Mr. Wibird pass’d the afternoon and evening here. Dr. Tufts called here on his way to Boston, and my brother Tom went to...
Ham[ilton]—They were ready to go as far as they thought safe, in recommendatory & explanatory Amend[ment]s —& secure the Constitu[tio]n—& that Many of the Amend[ment]s we have proposed—they suppose wrong—yet they will bring forward Amend[ment]s & will be pledged for to obtain those which they bring forward—as far as they can—Reads a form of adoption —Reads a list of amend[ment]s which they...
Amendments to the Constitution to be recommended I That there shall be one representative for every thirty thousand according to the enumeration or census mentioned in the constitution until the whole number of representatives amounts to two hundred; after which that number shall be continued or increased, but not diminished, as Congress shall direct, and according to such ratio as Congress...
Ham[ilton]—hopes the quest[io]n will not be pressed —as the Amend[ment]s expressly contemplate a condition—hopes time will be taken to consider of the New propositions—and not pass the revision by hastily taking this quest[io]n—which must be binding finally— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. As in his first remarks on this date, H is referring to a vote on an...
Ham[ilton]—extremely sorry Lan[sing] cannot see the matter as he does —has this consolation, that they have done all they could to conciliate—heartily wishes the matter may be postponed till tomorrow—gent[lemen] have men[tione]d the breach of the Confed[eratio]n —considers the clause of amend[ment]s in it only going to the mode of govt—people may alter their govt—Mot[io]n that the committee...
2508[Diary entry: 15 July 1788] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 15th. Thermometer at 74 in the Morning—80 at Noon and 78 at Night. Cloudy Morning with droppings of Rain but more clear afterwards with variable winds. Early in the Morning Mrs. Stuart and family left this and about 11 Oclock Mrs. Washington & myself accompanied Mr. Mrs. Morris &ca. as far as Alexandria on their return to Philadelphia. We all dined (in a large Company) at Mr. Willm....
By some unusual delay in the Post office, I did not receive your kind letter of the 21st of April untill the 30th of June; or I should have sooner done myself the pleasure of acknowledging the receipt and of returning my best thanks for your friendly sentiments and wishes. I beg you will be persuaded of the satisfaction I take in hearing from my old military friends and of the interest I feel...
I am much obliged to you for the two curiousities you were pleased to transmit, as well as for your distinct and ingenious account of them. The facts have been so clearly stated by you, as I believe, to render a farther elucidation or confirmation unnec[e]ssary. It is greatly to be regretted, that we have not in America some general Museum or Cabinet for receiving all the rare Phenomena and...
Is it possible that I write another letter before I have My answer from My two last! What can be the reason? It is either obstinacy, or Constancy in Me: but what does your silence Mean My dear friend! It seems that opportunities absolutly force themselves on you to recal me to your remembrances, should I have otherwise so much Courage or should I be so bold as to insist in a corrispondance!...
We recieved in course your Excellency’s obliging letter of the 27h. of last month and are very thankful for its contents. We immediately communicated it to Mr. Minier one of the partners of the late house (en Comandite) of Puchelberg & Co. in L’Orient and he shares our gratitude for your kind endeavours of bringing the affair of the Alliance to a final settlement. After many interviews and...
251314th. (Adams Papers)
Ben Beale came from Taunton this morning; he did not stop, but promised to come and see us ere long. When I came in from shooting, which still continues to be my sport and my occupation, I found a Parson West here, an old gentleman, who was three years in college with my father, and at that time very intimate with him. He is very sociable and very sensible. He spent the day here, and passes...
Your character as a federalist, has induced me, altho’ personally unknown to you, to address you on a subject of very great importance to the State of Vermont, of which I am a citizen, and from which, I think, may be derived a considerable advantage to the fœderal Cause. Ten States have now adopted the new fœderal plan of government. That it will now succeed is beyond doubt; what disputes the...
[ Tinmouth, Vermont, July 14, 1788. On this date Nathaniel Chipman wrote Hamilton that Kelly “writes by the same opportunity.” Letter not found. ]
Ham[ilton] wishes the questin may not be put as it will now be a decision of the comparitive view betwn the two propositions. True it has been largely discussed; on saturday said he supposed it would amount to a rejection, yet would suggest same Ideas. Recappitulates the argts of saturday; is willing to agree that the constitution was Advisory; it has now become obligatory by the will of the...
Mr. Hamilton.   1st. our powers—agreed yt. the Constitution, was advisory—suppose the Constitution advice, we must refer to the instrument—it is impossible that the Convenn. or the people shd. have had in view, such alterations because until they had assented, there was no body to submit amendments to—there being no common body to determine. Therefore it must of necessity been their view that...
2518[Diary entry: 14 July 1788] (Washington Papers)
Monday 14th. Thermometer at 74 in the morning 79 at Noon and 76 at Night. Calm Morning, with very little wind all day, & that variable. Rid before Breakfast to the Plantations at the Ferry, Frenchs Dogue run and Muddy hole—at all they were putting up the Fences which were blown down yesterday—after which, At the Ferry the hands went to cutting & securing Wheat (which, tho’ standing, was very...
Some short Time since Col. Morgan, of Princeton, left with me a Parcel for your Excellency, with a Request that I would forward it at any Time when we happened to have a small Mail; I have now the Honor to transmit it, with Assurances of the warmest Attachment of Your Excellency’s most obedient humble Servant ALS , DLC:GW . GW wrote Hazard from Mount Vernon on 22 July: “Sir, The letters with...
Colo. Humphreys intimated to me, when he was in Connecticut, that I might use the freedom to forward Letters to him, under cover to your Excellency. This, Sir, is my apology, for giving you the trouble of delivering the enclosed to the Colo. whh I beg you to excuse. I am with the highest respect & esteem Your Excellency’s most Obdt & most humble Servt ALS , DLC:GW .